canon definition

  • noun:
    • An ecclesiastical law or rule of rules founded by a church council.
    • A secular legislation, guideline, or rule of law.
    • a well established principle: the canons of polite culture.
    • A basis for wisdom; a typical or criterion.
    • The books of this Bible officially accepted as Holy Scripture.
    • A group of literary works that are generally speaking accepted as representing a field: "the durable canon of United States quick fiction” ( William Styron).
    • The works of a writer which have been acknowledged as authentic: the entire Shakespeare canon.
    • The the main Mass beginning following the Preface and Sanctus and closing right before god's Prayer.
    • The schedule of saints acknowledged by the Roman Catholic Church.
    • songs A composition or passageway by which a melody is imitated by several sounds at fixed periods of pitch and time.
    • a part of a chapter of priests serving in a cathedral or collegiate church.
    • an associate of particular religious communities living under a typical rule and limited by vows.
    • A generally accepted principle.
    • a team of literary works which are generally speaking acknowledged as representing a field.
    • The works of a writer that have been acknowledged as genuine.
    • A eucharistic prayer, specially the Roman Canon.
    • A religious law or human anatomy of legislation decreed because of the chapel.
    • a part of a cathedral section
    • A piece of music where the exact same melody is played by various voices, but beginning at different occuring times.
    • Those sources, especially including literary works, which are generally considered authoritative regarding a given fictional universe.
    • A rolled and filleted loin of animal meat.
    • A law or rule.
    • A law, or rule of doctrine or control, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a choice, legislation, rule, or constitution produced by ecclesiastical expert.
    • The number of books obtained as real Holy Scriptures, labeled as the sacred canon, or basic guideline of ethical and religious task, distributed by determination; the Bible; also, anybody regarding the canonical Scriptures. See Canonical publications, under Canonical, a.
    • In monasteries, a book containing the guidelines of a religious purchase.
    • A catalogue of saints recognized and canonized inside Roman Catholic Church.
    • a part of a cathedral chapter; an individual who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.
    • A musical composition in which the sounds begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively trying out similar subject. It both winds with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each vocals finishes, commences anew, thus developing a perpetual fugue or round. It's the strictest type of imitation. See Imitation.
    • the greatest measurements of type having a certain title; -- so-called from having already been employed for printing the canons regarding the church.
    • The part of a bell through which its suspended; -- labeled as also ear and shank.
    • See Carom.
    • A rule or law in general.
    • Eccles.: A law or rule of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council or any other competent ecclesiastical expert.
    • In liturgics, that area of the liturgy or size which include the consecration, great oblation, and great intercession.
    • The books of the Holy Scripture accepted by the Christian church as containing an authoritative rule of spiritual belief and rehearse.
    • the principles of a religious purchase, or of persons specialized in a strictly spiritual life, as monks and nuns; additionally, the book where such principles art written.
    • A catalogue or record; specifically, the catalogue of people in the section of a cathedral or collegiate church.
    • A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized, as in the Roman Catholic and Eastern churches.
    • In art, a rule or system of measures of such a character that, the dimensions of one regarding the parts being provided, those for the whole could be deduced, and vice versa.
    • In music, a type of fugal structure in 2 or even more parts, constructed based on the rigid rules of imitation.
    • In math: a broad rule when it comes to solution of cases of similar nature.
    • An extensible table or group of tables.
    • an accumulation of treatments.
    • In reasoning, a fundamental and invariable maxim, including, Nothing ought to be done without a reason.
    • In the Kantian philosophy, the technology which determines just the right using any professors of cognition: as, pure reasoning may be the canon associated with formal utilization of the comprehension and reason; transcendental analytics is the canon of this utilization of the understanding a priori, etc.
    • In pharmacy, a rule for compounding medications.
    • In (Gr. hymnology, a hymn consisting usually of a succession of nine odes, but often of eight (sometimes of only three or four), the 2nd becoming omitted, except in Lent, the numbers of the next, 4th, etc., but continuing to be unaltered. See ode, tetraodion, triodion.
    • yearly cost for use of land; lease; a quit-rent.
    • In printing, a large text printing-type, in size about 17⅘ lines to the linear foot: so called from its early employment in printing the canon of the mass and the service-books of the church.
    • A canon whose subject comes back into itself; an infinite or perpetual canon.
    • A canon whose subject ends in a vital one semitone above that which it began, to ensure twelve repetitions traverse the group of keys.
    • A dignitary just who possesses a prebend or income allocated for overall performance of divine service in a cathedral or collegiate chapel; an associate of this section of a cathedral or collegiate church.
    • See cannon, 7.
    • a collection of publications accepted as holy scripture especially the books regarding the Bible identified by any Christian church as real and motivated
    • a ravine formed by a river in a location with little rain
    • an entire list of saints which have been recognized by the Roman Catholic Church
    • a contrapuntal piece of music which a melody in one part is imitated precisely in other parts
    • a rule or especially human body of principles or concepts generally set up as legitimate and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy
    • a priest that is a part of a cathedral chapter
    • An ecclesiastical legislation or rule of guidelines established by a church council.
    • A secular legislation, guideline, or code of law.
    • An established concept: the canons of courteous culture.
    • A basis for wisdom; a standard or criterion.
    • The books of this Bible officially accepted as Holy Scripture.
    • A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field: "the durable canon of American short fiction” ( William Styron).
    • The works of a writer which were acknowledged as genuine: the whole Shakespeare canon.
    • The part of the Mass start following the Preface and Sanctus and ending before the father's Prayer.
    • The calendar of saints accepted by the Roman Catholic Church.
    • songs A composition or passage which a melody is imitated by one or more sounds at fixed intervals of pitch and time.
    • an associate of a chapter of priests serving in a cathedral or collegiate chapel.
    • an associate of particular spiritual communities residing under a common rule and limited by vows.
    • A generally acknowledged principle.
    • several literary works that are generally speaking accepted as representing a field.
    • The works of a writer which have been accepted as genuine.
    • A eucharistic prayer, especially the Roman Canon.
    • A religious law or human anatomy of legislation decreed because of the church.
    • a part of a cathedral part
    • some songs where exact same melody is played by various voices, but beginning at different times.
    • Those resources, especially including literary works, which can be considered authoritative with regards to certain fictional world.
    • A rolled and filleted loin of beef.
    • A law or guideline.
    • A law, or guideline of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope and/or sovereign; a decision, legislation, signal, or constitution created by ecclesiastical expert.
    • The assortment of publications obtained as real Holy Scriptures, called the sacred canon, or general guideline of moral and religious task, distributed by motivation; the Bible; additionally, anyone associated with canonical Scriptures. See Canonical publications, under Canonical, a.
    • In monasteries, a novel containing the guidelines of a religious order.
    • A catalogue of saints recognized and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church.
    • A member of a cathedral section; someone who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate chapel.
    • A musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular periods, successively using up similar topic. It often winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus creating a perpetual fugue or round. It is the strictest type of imitation. See Imitation.
    • the biggest measurements of type having a specific title; -- so called from having been useful for printing the canons of the church.
    • The element of a bell where it's suspended; -- called in addition ear and shank.
    • See Carom.
    • A rule or law generally.
    • Eccles.: A law or guideline of doctrine or control, enacted by a council or other competent ecclesiastical authority.
    • In liturgics, that an element of the liturgy or mass including the consecration, great oblation, and great intercession.
    • The publications of this Holy Scripture accepted because of the Christian chapel as containing an authoritative guideline of spiritual trust and training.
    • the guidelines of a religious purchase, or of persons specialized in a strictly spiritual life, as monks and nuns; in addition, the guide by which these types of guidelines art written.
    • A catalogue or list; especially, the catalogue of people in the part of a cathedral or collegiate church.
    • A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized, as in the Roman Catholic and Eastern churches.
    • In art, a rule or system of steps of such a character that, the proportions of just one regarding the components becoming given, those of entire can be deduced, and vice versa.
    • In music, a kind of fugal composition in 2 or even more parts, constructed based on the rigid principles of imitation.
    • In mathematics: a broad guideline for answer of cases of comparable nature.
    • An extensible dining table or set of tables.
    • an accumulation remedies.
    • In reasoning, a fundamental and invariable maxim, such as for instance, Nothing should be done without a reason.
    • inside Kantian viewpoint, the research which determines the best use of any faculty of cognition: as, pure logic is the canon of formal use of the comprehension and reason; transcendental analytics could be the canon associated with use of the comprehension a priori, and so forth.
    • In pharmacy, a rule for compounding medicines.
    • In (Gr. hymnology, a hymn consisting normally of a succession of nine odes, but frequently of eight (occasionally of only 3 or 4), the 2nd becoming omitted, except in Lent, the numbers of the next, fourth, etc., however, continuing to be unaltered. See ode, tetraodion, triodion.
    • Annual fee to be used of land; rent; a quit-rent.
    • In printing, a large text printing-type, in dimensions about 17⅘ lines into linear base: so called from its very early work in printing the canon associated with the size additionally the service-books of this church.
    • A canon whoever subject returns into it self; an infinite or perpetual canon.
    • A canon whose topic ends in a key one semitone above that where it started, to make certain that twelve reps traverse the circle of secrets.
    • A dignitary whom possesses a prebend or income allocated for overall performance of divine service in a cathedral or collegiate chapel; a member associated with chapter of a cathedral or collegiate church.
    • See cannon, 7.
    • an accumulation of publications accepted as holy scripture especially the publications associated with the Bible identified by any Christian church as real and prompted
    • a ravine created by a river in a place with little rain
    • a whole range of saints which were identified by the Roman Catholic Church
    • a contrapuntal bit of songs where a melody in a single part is imitated exactly in other parts
    • a rule or specifically human anatomy of principles or concepts generally founded as legitimate and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy
    • a priest who is an associate of a cathedral part

Related Sources

  • Definition for "canon"
    • An ecclesiastical law or rule of rules founded…
    • View More
  • Sentence for "canon"
    • The word canon, in classical Greek,…
    • View More
  • Quotes for "canon"
    • "We tried to approach this as…"
    • View More
  • Cross Reference for "canon"
  • Equivalent for "canon"
  • Urban Dictionary for "canon"
1433 votes

How would you define canon?

All the definitions on AZdictionary were written by people just like you. Now's your chance to add your own!