common definition

  • adjective:
    • that belong equally to or provided equally by two or more; joint: typical interests.
    • Of or relating to the neighborhood all together; public: when it comes to common good. See Usage Note at mutual.
    • Widespread; prevalent.
    • developing usually or constantly; usual.
    • most commonly known; ordinary: the normal housefly.
    • Having no special designation, standing, or ranking: a common sailor.
    • perhaps not distinguished by superior or noteworthy qualities; average: the most popular spectator.
    • Of no unique quality; standard: common procedure.
    • Of mediocre or substandard high quality; second-rate: common fabric.
    • Unrefined or coarse in fashion; vulgar: behavior that branded him as common.
    • Grammar Either masculine or feminine in gender.
    • Grammar Representing one or all of the members of a class; perhaps not designating an original entity.
    • Mutual; shared by several.
    • Occurring or taking place frequently or often; usual.
    • present vast quantities or perhaps in a large amount.
    • Simple, ordinary or vulgar.
    • in a few languages, specifically Germanic languages, of the sex originating from the coalescence associated with the masculine and feminine kinds of nouns.
    • Of or related to uncapitalized nouns in English, in other words., common nouns vs. proper nouns
    • vernacular, talking about title of some sort of plant or pet, in other words., typical name vs. medical name
    • Belonging or relating equally, or likewise, to more than one.
    • Belonging to or shared by, affecting or offering, all members of a course, considered collectively; basic; general public.
    • Often satisfied with; usual; frequent; customary.
    • perhaps not distinguished or exceptional; inconspicuous; ordinary; plebeian; -- usually in a depreciatory good sense.
    • Profane; polluted.
    • directed at habits of lewdness; prostitute.
    • commonly encountered
    • of or associated with the great public of individuals
    • typical to or shared by several parties
    • becoming or characteristic of or proper to every day language
    • owned by or participated in by a residential area in general; community
    • to be expected; standard
    • of reasonable or substandard high quality or worth
    • having no unique distinction or high quality; widely known or frequently encountered; average or ordinary or normal
    • lacking sophistication or cultivation or style
    • Belonging similarly to or shared similarly by a couple of; joint: typical passions.
    • Of or relating to the community in general; public: the typical good. See Usage Note at shared.
    • Widespread; commonplace.
    • developing regularly or habitually; normal.
    • Most widely known; ordinary: the most popular housefly.
    • Having no special designation, standing, or ranking: a common sailor.
    • maybe not distinguished by exceptional or noteworthy qualities; average: the common spectator.
    • Of no special high quality; standard: common treatment.
    • Of mediocre or inferior high quality; second-rate: typical fabric.
    • Unrefined or coarse in manner; vulgar: behavior that branded him as typical.
    • Grammar Either masculine or womanly in sex.
    • Grammar Representing one or most of the members of a class; maybe not designating a unique entity.
    • Mutual; shared by more than one.
    • developing or occurring on a regular basis or frequently; typical.
    • Found in good sized quantities or in a sizable quantity.
    • Simple, ordinary or vulgar.
    • in certain languages, especially Germanic languages, associated with the sex from the coalescence associated with the masculine and feminine types of nouns.
    • Of or pertaining to uncapitalized nouns in English, for example., typical nouns vs. appropriate nouns
    • vernacular, talking about the name of a type of plant or animal, for example., common name vs. systematic title
    • Belonging or relating similarly, or similarly, to multiple.
    • Belonging to or provided by, influencing or offering, all people in a course, considered together; general; public.
    • frequently fulfilled with; normal; frequent; customary.
    • Not distinguished or exemplary; hidden; ordinary; plebeian; -- often in a depreciatory sense.
    • Profane; contaminated.
    • directed at habits of lewdness; prostitute.
    • frequently experienced
    • of or associated with the great public of people
    • common to or provided by two or more events
    • being or characteristic of or proper to everyday language
    • belonging to or participated in by a residential district as a whole; general public
    • to-be expected; standard
    • of reasonable or inferior quality or price
    • having no special difference or high quality; well known or frequently experienced; typical or ordinary or normal
    • lacking sophistication or cultivation or flavor
  • noun:
    • The common folks; commonalty.
    • The personal class composed of commoners.
    • The parliamentary associates with this course.
    • The House of Commons. Usually used in the plural.
    • A tract of land, typically in a centrally positioned place, owned by or utilized by a residential district overall: a band concert on town common.
    • The right of a person to make use of the places or seas of some other, as for fishing.
    • A building or hallway for dining, usually at a university or university.
    • typical stock.
    • Ecclesiastical A service utilized for a particular course of festivals.
    • shared great, provided by more than one.
    • A tract of land in accordance ownership; common land.
    • individuals; the city.
    • An inclosed or uninclosed area of ground for pleasure, for pasturage, etc., employing which belongs to the general public; or even to some persons.
    • Just The Right of taking a profit within the land of some other, in keeping either aided by the owner or along with other people; -- so named from the community of great interest which arises between the claimant of the right together with owner associated with the soil, or between your claimants alongside commoners entitled to equivalent right.
    • [⟨ ME. comon, comun, comyn, etc., usually in pl. comons, etc., the typical folks, commons (men and women), commons (fare), = MHG. commū ne, comū ne, ⟨ OF. commune, French commune (⟩ mod. E. commune, n.) = Pr. comuna, comunia = It. comuna, ⟨ L. commune, whatever is typical, the community, in ML. a commune (blended with ML. communia and communa, a typical pasture, typical right, a society, guild), prop. neut. of communis, common: see above.] The common men and women; collectively, the individuals most importantly; people; the reduced courses.
    • plural See commons.
    • A tract of surface the usage that will be perhaps not appropriated to an individual, but belongs to the public or even to a number; in-law, an open floor, or that soil the use of which belongs equally to your inhabitants of a town or of a lordship, or to a particular number of proprietors.
    • In law, a right what type individual may need to take an income from the land or waters of some other, on pasture their cattle, to dig grass, to get seafood, to reduce timber, or even the like, in accordance with all the owner of land: called common of pasture, of turbary, of piscary, of estovers, etc.
    • an item of available land for recreational used in an urban area
    • the typical individuals; commonalty.
    • The personal class made up of commoners.
    • The parliamentary associates of the class.
    • The House of Commons. Frequently found in the plural.
    • A tract of land, often in a centrally found spot, owned by or utilized by a residential area as a whole: a band show on the town typical.
    • The right of one to use the lands or waters of some other, as for fishing.
    • A building or hallway for dining, typically at a university or university.
    • typical stock.
    • Ecclesiastical a site employed for a specific class of festivals.
    • Mutual good, shared by more than one.
    • A tract of land in common ownership; typical land.
    • The people; town.
    • An inclosed or uninclosed tract of floor for enjoyment, for pasturage, etc., the utilization of which is one of the public; or to many people.
    • the best of taking a revenue within the land of some other, in common either with the owner or with other people; -- so-called through the neighborhood of great interest which occurs between your claimant associated with the right and owner for the earth, or between your claimants alongside commoners entitled to the exact same right.
    • [⟨ ME. comon, comun, comyn, etc., usually in pl. comons, etc., the normal individuals, commons (men and women), commons (fare), = MHG. commū ne, comū ne, ⟨ OF. commune, French commune (⟩ mod. E. commune, n.) = Pr. comuna, comunia = It. comuna, ⟨ L. commune, what is typical, the community, in ML. a commune (blended with ML. communia and communa, a typical pasture, common right, a society, guild), prop. neut. of communis, typical: see above.] One of many typical individuals; collectively, the people most importantly; people; the reduced courses.
    • plural See commons.
    • A tract of floor using that is not appropriated to someone, but is one of the public or even a number; in-law, an open surface, or that earth employing which belongs equally toward inhabitants of a town or of a lordship, or to a specific range proprietors.
    • In law, the right which one individual may need to take a revenue from land or seas of another, on pasture their cattle, to dig grass, to catch fish, to reduce wood, or the love, in common using the owner of land: called common of pasture, of turbary, of piscary, of estovers, etc.
    • a bit of available land for recreational used in an urban area
  • idiom:
    • in common similarly with or by all.
    • in accordance similarly with or by all.
  • verb:
    • To communicate (something).
    • To converse, chat.
    • to own sex.
    • To take part.
    • to own a joint right with other people in keeping surface.
    • To board together; to eat at a table in accordance.
    • To communicate (some thing).
    • To converse, talk.
    • To have sex.
    • To engage.
    • having a joint right with others in accordance surface.
    • To board collectively; to consume at a table in common.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To converse collectively; to discourse; to confer.
    • To take part.
    • having a joint right with others in common surface.
    • To board together; to eat at a table in accordance.
    • To converse collectively; to discourse; to confer.
    • To engage.
    • To have a joint right with other people in keeping surface.
    • To board together; for eating at a table in accordance.
  • others:
    • Of or with respect to all—that is, to all or any the human race, or even all in a given country, area, or locality; becoming a broad possession or right: of a public nature or personality.
    • Pertaining similarly to, or continuing similarly from, a couple of; joint: as, life and good sense are normal to guy and beast; it absolutely was done-by common consent regarding the parties.
    • Of regular or typical event; not exemplary; usual; habitual.
    • maybe not distinguished from most other people; of persons, belonging to the general size; maybe not significant for ranking, ability, etc.; of things, perhaps not of exceptional excellence; ordinary: because, a common soldier; the normal people; typical food or clothes.
    • regarding the common people.
    • Trite; hackneyed; commonplace; reasonable; substandard; vulgar; coarse.
    • at disposal of all; prostitute.
    • Not sacred or sanctified; ceremonially unclean.
    • In grammar: Both masculine and feminine; optionally masculine or womanly: stated of a word, in a language generally distinguishing masculine and womanly, which will be effective at use as often.
    • Pre-owned indifferently to designate anyone of a course; appellative; maybe not proper: because, a common noun: opposed to proper (which see).
    • In prosody, either lengthy or quick; of skeptical or variable volume: because, a typical vowel; a typical syllable.
    • In physiology: Not strange or certain; maybe not specific or classified: since, the common integument for the human anatomy.
    • Forming or created by other much more specific components: since, the typical carotid or common iliac artery, as distinguished from the internal and external arteries of the identical name; the most popular trunk area of a nerve, as distinguished from its branches; the most popular source of the coracobrachialis muscle as well as the short mind for the biceps muscle—that is, the foundation that they have as a common factor.
    • In entomology, continuous on two united surfaces: stated of lines and markings which go in an uninterrupted manner through the anterior into posterior wings whenever both tend to be extended, or of
    • markings or processes from the two elytra which when closed appear as you.
    • In those elements of the southern united states of america that have been formerly a province of France, small tracts of land, often in one to 3 yards in width by forty in length and fenced in, of cultivated by the inhabitants of villages.
    • even more properly, the components of the previous system that do not rest for expert on any subsisting show legislative work; the unwritten legislation. Within sense common law is made up in those axioms and principles that are collected from the reports of adjudged instances, from the opinions of text-writers and commentators, and from well-known use and custom, in contradistinction to statute legislation.
    • More narrowly, that part of the system just defined that was acknowledged and administered because of the master's justices, in contradistinction towards the changes introduced because of the chancellors as guidelines of equity in restraint or enhancement regarding the customary and statutory law (see equity), and, in respect of process, in contradistinction to the code practice.
    • In songs, duple and quadruple rhythm. The most common sign (A) for these rhythms comes from the idea of medieval performers that duple rhythm was imperfect, therefore is suggested by a half or broken circle (B). It isn't the first of the word “common,” since initially triple rhythm was viewed as the typical or perfect rhythm. The sign A now frequently signifies quadruple rhythm, four beats on measure, while C indicates duple rhythm, two beats towards measure. Also known as typical time.
    • an option or argument appropriate to a variety of situations. See location.
    • Sound useful wisdom; sense; the practical feeling of the greater part of mankind, specially as unaffected by logical subtleties or imagination.
    • Equally with another or with other people; all equally; for equal use or involvement in by two or more: since, tenants in common; to give you for the kids in accordance; to assign lands to several persons in keeping; we benefit from the bounties of Providence in common.
    • in public places.
    • 4 and 6. Common, Ordinary, Vulgar, Mean. These terms take a descending scale. Typical is opposed to unusual, unusual, or processed; ordinary, to distinguished or exceptional; vulgar, to polite or refined; mean, to high or eminent.
    • To take part in typical; enjoy or suffer in keeping.
    • To confer; discourse collectively; commune; talk.
    • To have a joint right with other people in common floor.
    • to call home together or perhaps in common; eat at a table in common. In addition commonize.
    • To communicate.
    • Of or with respect to all—that is, to any or all the human race, or to all in confirmed country, region, or locality; becoming a broad ownership or correct: of a public nature or character.
    • Pertaining similarly to, or proceeding equally from, a couple of; joint: as, life and good sense are typical to man and beast; it absolutely was done by typical consent associated with functions.
    • Of regular or typical occurrence; maybe not excellent; typical; habitual.
    • Not distinguished from the almost all others; of persons, belonging to the basic mass; maybe not significant for rank, ability, etc.; of things, perhaps not of superior quality; ordinary: since, a common soldier; the typical people; common meals or clothing.
    • of common folks.
    • Trite; hackneyed; commonplace; low; inferior; vulgar; coarse.
    • within disposal of all; prostitute.
    • maybe not sacred or sanctified; ceremonially unclean.
    • In grammar: Both masculine and womanly; optionally masculine or womanly: stated of a word, in a language usually identifying masculine and womanly, which can be with the capacity of use as often.
    • Used indifferently to designate any individual of a class; appellative; not proper: as, a common noun: opposed to proper (which see).
    • In prosody, either lengthy or short; of skeptical or adjustable amount: as, a common vowel; a common syllable.
    • In structure: Not unusual or particular; maybe not specialized or classified: since, the most popular integument for the human anatomy.
    • creating or created by various other more certain components: because, the common carotid or typical iliac artery, as distinguished from the external and internal arteries of the same name; the common trunk area of a nerve, as distinguished from the branches; the common source of coracobrachialis muscle tissue as well as the brief head of the biceps muscle—that is, the foundation that they have in common.
    • In entomology, constant on two united areas: stated of lines and marks which go in an uninterrupted way from the anterior towards posterior wings whenever both tend to be extended, or of
    • markings or procedures on two elytra which whenever shut look together.
    • In those elements of the southern usa of previously a province of France, tiny tracts of land, typically from to three yards wide by forty in length and secured, of cultivated by the residents of villages.
    • much more accordingly, the elements of the previous system which do not rest because of their authority on any subsisting show legislative work; the unwritten legislation. In this good sense common law is made up in those maxims and guidelines which are collected through the reports of adjudged situations, through the views of text-writers and commentators, and from popular usage and custom, in contradistinction to statute legislation.
    • much more narrowly, that an element of the system only defined that has been acknowledged and administered by the king's justices, in contradistinction towards the modifications introduced because of the chancellors as guidelines of equity in restraint or enlargement associated with customary and statutory law (identify equity), and, in respect of treatment, in contradistinction to your code rehearse.
    • In songs, duple and quadruple rhythm. The typical sign (A) for those rhythms is derived from the theory of medieval musicians that duple rhythm had been imperfect, so to be suggested by a half or broken group (B). It's not the first associated with the word “common,” since initially triple rhythm ended up being thought to be the typical or perfect rhythm. The indication A now usually signifies quadruple rhythm, four music to the measure, while C signifies duple rhythm, two music into measure. Also known as common time.
    • considered or debate appropriate to multiple cases. See spot.
    • Sound useful wisdom; good sense; the useful sense of the greater part of humanity, especially as unchanged by reasonable subtleties or imagination.
    • similarly with another or with other people; all equally; for equal use or involvement in by a couple of: since, tenants in accordance; to deliver for children in keeping; to designate places to a couple of individuals in accordance; we benefit from the bounties of Providence in keeping.
    • In public.
    • 4 and 6. Typical, Ordinary, Vulgar, Suggest. These terms are on a descending scale. Typical is against unusual, unusual, or processed; ordinary, to distinguished or exceptional; vulgar, to polite or refined; mean, to high or eminent.
    • To take part in typical; enjoy or suffer in common.
    • To confer; discourse collectively; commune; talk.
    • To have a joint right with others in common ground.
    • to reside collectively or in typical; consume at a table in keeping. Additionally commonize.
    • To communicate.

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