act definition

  • noun:
    • The process of doing or performing one thing: the work of reasoning.
    • Something done or carried out; a deed: a charitable act.
    • A product, particularly a statute, decree, or enactment, resulting from a decision by a legislative or judicial human anatomy: an act of Congress.
    • A formal written record of procedures or deals.
    • one of several significant divisions of a play or opera.
    • A performance or entertainment often forming part of a lengthier presentation: a juggling work; a magic act.
    • The star or stars presenting such a performance: joined the act in Phoenix.
    • A manifestation of intentional or unintentional insincerity; a pose: put on an act.
    • Something done, a deed.
    • Actuality.
    • an item of a legislative human anatomy, a statute.
    • the entire process of performing one thing.
    • A formal or formal record of some thing done.
    • A division of a theatrical performance.
    • A performer or performers in a show.
    • Any arranged activity.
    • A display of behaviour.
    • That which is performed or performing; the exercise of energy, or perhaps the effect, that energy exerted may be the cause; a performance; a deed.
    • caused by community deliberation; the decision or determination of a legislative human body, council, courtroom of justice, etc.; a decree, edit, law, judgment, resolve, award.
    • an official solemn writing, revealing that some thing was done.
    • A performance of section of a play; one of many principal divisions of a play or dramatic work with which a certain definite the main activity is finished.
    • A thesis maintained in public places, in a few English universities, by a candidate for a qualification, or to show the proficiency of students.
    • a situation of truth or real presence in the place of a possibility or possible existence.
    • procedure for doing; action. In work, within the very doing; in the point of (doing).
    • An exertion of energy or power, real or mental; something that is performed or carried out; a doing or deed; a procedure or overall performance.
    • A state of genuine existence, in place of possible, power, or being in germ merely; reality; actualization; entelechy.
    • The heart, based on the Aristotelians, could be the work, that's, is the entelechy or perfect growth of the body. So God is considered pure work, for Aristotle claims, “There needs to be a principle whose essence it is become actual (η%148ς ἠ ον)σία ἐνε)ργεια),” and also this is by many article writers understood to mean “whose essence will be active.” Within the term in work, for that reason, work, though properly indicating reality, is usually used to suggest task.
    • A part or division of a play performed consecutively or without a fall regarding the curtain, by which a certain and coherent percentage of the plot is represented: generally subdivided into smaller portions, labeled as scenes.
    • the consequence of community deliberation, and/or choice of a prince, legislative body, council, judge of justice, or magistrate; a decree, edict, legislation, statute, view, resolve, or award: as, an act of Parliament or of Congress; also, in plural, procedures; the formal record of legislative resolves or for the doings of an individual.
    • In universities, a public disputation or lecture needed of an applicant for a qualification of master.
    • [These types of a synopsis (cedula), stating the full time of studies, the acts made, and levels taken by the applicant, and duly sworn to, had often already been required in universities because the dark ages.]
    • In law, a musical instrument or deed on paper, serving to prove the facts of some bargain or deal: as, I deliver this as my work and deed.
    • In theology, something done simultaneously as soon as for all, as distinguished from a-work.
    • a moment work (1890) which provided for a yearly appropriation, to be increased in a decade from $15,000 to a permanent sum of $25,000 from profits associated with the sale of public land, for the much more full endowment of the institutions. This earnings could be used and then instruction (with services) in farming, the mechanic arts, the English language, as well as other limbs directly associated with professional life.
    • a brief theatrical overall performance this is certainly element of a longer program
    • something that folks do or cause to happen
    • a subdivision of a play or opera or dancing
    • a manifestation of insincerity
    • a legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or community or legislative human anatomy
  • verb-transitive:
    • To play the part of; assume the remarkable part of: She plans to act Lady Macbeth during the summer stock.
    • to do (a job) from the phase: work the an element of the villain.
    • To respond love or pose as; impersonate: Don't work the trick.
    • To respond in a way ideal for: Act your actual age.
    • To move to activity; to actuate; to animate.
    • to do; to execute; to-do.
    • To perform, as an actor; to represent dramatically on the stage.
    • To assume work or character of; to play; to personate.
    • To feign or counterfeit; to simulate.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To respond or comport oneself: She acts like a born leader.
    • to do in a dramatic role or functions.
    • become appropriate theatrical performance: This scene functions well.
    • To behave affectedly or unnaturally; imagine.
    • appearing or be seemingly: canine acted ferocious.
    • to handle an action: We acted instantly. The governor has not yet acted on the bill.
    • to use or function in a particular means: His head acts quickly.
    • To offer or work as a substitute for the next: A coin can behave as a screwdriver.
    • to create an effect: waited five minutes for anesthetic to do something.
    • To exert energy; to produce an effect.
    • to execute actions; to meet functions; to put forth energy; to move, as opposed to remaining at rest; to carry into effect a determination associated with might.
    • To behave or conduct, as in morals, private tasks, or general public offices; to keep or deport your self.
    • to do from the phase; to portray a character.
  • phrasal-verb:
    • act out to do in or as though in a play; represent significantly: work completely an account.
    • act out To realize in action: wished to work completely their theory.
    • act out to state (unconscious impulses, including) in an overt way without mindful comprehension or respect for social appropriateness.
    • work up To misbehave.
    • act up To breakdown.
    • work up Informal In order to become active or troublesome over time of quiescence: My remaining knee acts up in wet weather condition. The woman joint disease is acting up again.
  • idiom:
    • be in regarding act become incorporated into an activity.
    • clean up (one's) work Slang to boost an individual's behavior or performance.
    • get into the work To place oneself into an ongoing task, project, or circumstance.
    • get (one's) work together Slang to have organized.
  • verb:
    • to accomplish anything.
    • To perform a theatrical role.
    • To act in a certain means.
    • To convey an appearance to be.
    • to possess an effect (on).
    • to try out (a task).
    • To feign.
    • To map via a homomorphism to a small grouping of automorphisms (of).
    • perform on a stage or movie theater
    • make a splash or outcome; the one desired or anticipated
    • be engaged in a task, usually for no particular purpose apart from satisfaction
    • pretend having particular qualities or frame of mind
    • be ideal for theatrical performance
    • behave in a specific manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself
    • be the cause or component
    • behave unnaturally or affectedly
    • perform an action, or work out or do (an action)
    • discharge a person's responsibilities
  • others:
    • to accomplish, perform, or transact.
    • To represent by action; perform on or as on stage; play, or play the section of; for this reason, feign or fake: because, to act Macbeth; to do something the enthusiast, or even the section of a lover.
    • To perform any office of; assume the smoothness of: as, to behave the hero.
    • to include action; actuate.
    • to-do one thing; use energy or power in any way: made use of of any such thing effective at action, either initial or communicated, or of creating results. Specifically
    • to place forth energy or energy; workout motion or company; be employed or operative: as, to behave vigorously or languidly; he could be acting against their own interest; his mind acts sluggishly.
    • To use influence or produce results: do a function or features; operate: as, praise will act as a stimulant; mind functions upon mind; the medicine didn't work; the braking system declined to behave, or to act upon the tires.
    • becoming employed or operate in a specific way; do particular obligations or functions: since, a deputy functions for or perhaps in place of their principal; he refused to behave on or as a member of committee.
    • to execute as an actor; represent a character; thus, to feign or assume a part: as, he functions really; he's just acting.
    • he's a person of sentiment, and acts as much as the sentiments he professes. Sheridan, class for Scandal, i. 2. Synonyms Act, Work, run. These words agree in expressing the successful exertion of power. Within their intransitive usage they have been occasionally compatible: since, a medicine acts, works, or runs; a plan works or operates. Where they differ, act may more frequently make reference to a single action or even the simpler forms of activity: as, a machine is very effective when all its parts act. Act are often the absolute most general, signing up to persons or things, the others applying generally to things. Work, may express the greater elaborate types of action. Work may show the greater powerful forms of action: as, it worked upon their head.

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