chock definition

  • noun:
    • A block or wedge placed directly under something different, including a wheel, to help keep it from moving.
    • Nautical much fitting of metal or wood with two jaws curving inwards, by which a rope or cable can be run.
    • Any wooden block used as a wedge or filler
    • Any fitting or fixture regularly limit activity, specially activity of a line; traditionally was a fixture near a bulwark with two horns pointing towards both, with a gap between where in actuality the range can be inserted.
    • Blocks manufactured from either timber, plastic or steel, accustomed hold a parked aircraft constantly in place.
    • An encounter.
    • A wedge, or block meant to easily fit into any space which it really is wished to fill, esp. anything to steady a cask or other human body, or prevent it from going, by fitting into the space around or beneath it.
    • A heavy casting of material, frequently fixed close to the gunwale. It offers two brief horn-shaped hands curving inward, between which ropes or hawsers may pass for towing, mooring, etc.
    • An encounter.
    • A block or piece of wood or other material, more or less wedge-shaped when specially prepared, used to prevent movement, as by insertion behind the props of a ship's cradle, under the sides of a boat on deck, under the wheels of a carriage, etc.—
    • In ship-building, a block of around triangular form, always unite the head and heel of successive timbers.—
    • Nautical, a block having hornshaped projections extending partly over a recess at the center, for which a cable or hawser is positioned while becoming hauled in or on: known as distinctively a warping-chock.—
    • In coal-mining, a pillar built of quick square obstructs of timber from 2½ to 6 legs very long, laid crosswise, two and two, in order to develop a good assistance the roofing: utilized particularly in long-wall doing work.
    • A block of timber, specifically one for burning. See chuck, 1.
    • A thick unsawed block of lumber. See chock and wood.
    • plural Blocks of lumber or stone added to a harrow, roller, or any other machine so it can have fat or steadiness.
    • In turnery, identical to chuck, 5.
    • A rut-like gap in a road.
    • a block of timber regularly prevent the sliding or rolling of a heavy item
  • verb-transitive:
    • to suit with or secure by a chock: The airplane's tires had been chocked and chained down.
    • Nautical to position (a boat) on chocks.
    • to cease or fasten, just like a wedge, or block; to scotch.
    • to come across.
  • adverb:
    • As close as you can: must remain chock up against the railing.
    • completely; quite.
    • because completely as possible
  • verb:
    • to cease or fasten, as with a wedge, or block; to scotch.
    • To place a line in a chock.
    • assistance on chocks
    • secure with chocks
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To fill up, as a cavity.
  • others:
    • A variant of choke.
    • Entirely; fully; as far as feasible: used in the nautical phrases chock aft, chock home, etc.
    • An obsolete variation of shock.
    • To throw with an instant movement; toss; pitch: identical to chuck, 2.
    • Nautical, to secure by putting a chock into or under: as, to chock the timbers of a ship; to chock a cask.
    • To refill a cavity like a chock.
    • to test the movement of, as by a chock.

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