but definition

  • conjunction:
    • to the contrary: the plan caused maybe not success but harm.
    • Contrary to hope; however: She organized her work but accomplished hardly any. He could be tired but delighted.
    • use Problem accustomed suggest an exception: nobody but she saw the prowler.
    • With the exception that; except that. Often used with that: might have accompanied the musical organization but he could not spare the full time; would have resisted but that they lacked courage.
    • Informal Without the result that: It never rains nonetheless it pours.
    • Informal That. Usually made use of after an adverse: there is absolutely no doubt but right will prevail.
    • That . . . not. Used after a poor or question: There never is a tax legislation presented but someone will oppose it.
    • Or Even; unless: "Ten-to-one nevertheless the authorities have got them” ( Charlotte M. Yonge).
    • Informal Than: that they had no sooner appeared however they switched around and left.
    • Except (for), excluding. Preceded by a negation.
    • on the other hand, but instead (exposing a word or clause that contrasts with or contradicts the preceding clause or phrase with no maybe not).
    • but although, however (means that the next clause is unlike prior belief or contrasts with otherwise contradicts the preceding term or sentence).
    • Except that (exposing a subordinate term which qualifies a negative declaration); also, with omission regarding the subject for the subordinate term, acting as a bad relative, "except one which", "except such that".
    • without one additionally becoming the truth that; unless that (launching a necessary concomitant).
  • preposition:
    • Use Problem Except.
    • outside.
    • Without, besides, except.
  • adverb:
    • simply; simply; only: hopes that lasted but an instant.
    • made use of as an intensive: get free from right here but fast!
    • simply, just.
    • (conjunctive) Though, however.
    • Except with; unless with; without.
    • Except; besides; save.
    • Excepting or excluding the reality that; save yourself that; had been it not that; unless; -- elliptical, for but that.
    • usually than that; that not; -- frequently, after a poor, with that.
    • just; solely; just.
    • Quite the opposite; on the other hand; just; however; still; but; nevertheless; more; further; -- as connective of phrases or clauses of a sentence, in this way pretty much exceptive or adversative.
    • and absolutely nothing much more
  • idiom:
    • however for had been it not for: except for: we'd reach the summit but for the elements.
  • noun:
    • a case or exemplory instance of making use of the word "but".
    • The external space of a small two-room cottage.
    • The exterior apartment or kitchen area of a two-roomed house; -- opposed to ben, the inner area.
    • A limit; a boundary.
    • The end; esp. the more expensive or thicker end, or perhaps the dull, in distinction through the razor-sharp, end. Today disused within good sense, becoming replaced by butt{2}. See first Butt.
    • The outer room of a residence consisting of only two spaces; the kitchen: one other room becoming the ben.
    • A flounder or plaice.
    • See butt.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • See butt, v., and abut, v.
  • others:
    • Outside; without; away.
    • In or to the outer area of a cottage having a but and a ben: since, he was just a few moments ago; he gaed but simply now.
    • Only; simply; simply. See III.
    • Beyond; without.—
    • To the outside of.—
    • towards exterior apartment of: as, gae nevertheless the house.
    • Without; without having; apart from.
    • Except; besides; more than.
    • Except; unless: after a clause containing or implying a negation, and introducing the next term, for which (the verb being frequently omitted because suggested in preceding term) but ahead of the noun (topic or object of omitted verb) comes to be considered to be a preposition regulating the noun.
    • The term introduced by but (the evident object regarding the qnasi-preposition) are just one term, an infinitive or prepositional phrase, or a clause with this.
    • By ellipsis associated with the topic of this term introduced by however in this building, but becomes equivalent to that … perhaps not or who … not.
    • within construction the negative, being suggested in but, came into existence omitted, especially in experience of the verbbe, inside principal term, the construction “There just isn't but one Jesus,” as in the first example, getting “There is but one Jesus,” leaving but as a quasi-adverb, ‘only, just, just.’ This usage can be extended to buildings maybe not originally negative.
    • toward last two constructions, respectively, belong the idioms “we cannot but hope that,” etc., and “i will but hope that,” an such like. The former features experienced ellipsis of major verb in the first clause: “I cannot do just about anything but hope,” or “anything else than hope,” or “otherwise than hope,” etc., implying constraint, for the reason that there was an alternate what type is mentally not able or reluctant to simply accept, but being comparable to otherwise than. The second, “I can but hope that,” etc., has actually experienced additional ellipsis of the bad, and, though typically the same as the former, is idiomatically different: “I can just hope that,” etc., implying restraint, because there isn't any alternative or possibility of activity, but being equal to just, maybe not usually than, or a maximum of.
    • In an interrogative sentence implying a poor answer, can it is equivalent to cannot in a declarative sentence.
    • After question, or doubt maybe not, alongside expressions concerning an adverse, but can be utilized as after various other negatives, but that becoming frequently made use of pleonastically for the.
    • thus the employment of however with if or that, forming a unitary phrase however if, ‘unless, if not,’ but that, ‘except that, unless’ (these expressions having of course also their analytical meaning, with however in its adversative usage).
    • The term but that, often abbreviated to but, hence takes an extended meaning. If you don't; unless.
    • Escept that, usually than that, that … maybe not. After unfavorable clauses.
    • The negative clause is actually represented because of the solitary word not.
    • An expletive just what occasionally, but improperly, follows.
    • After interrogative clauses implying a poor answer.
    • After imperative or exclamatory conditions.
    • Excepting or excluding the reality that; conserve that; had been it not too; unless.
    • but; however; however; nevertheless; notwithstanding: introducing a statement in restriction or adjustment of preceding statement.
    • Quite the opposite; on the other hand: the standard adversative combination, presenting a clause in comparison using the preceding.
    • The statement with that your clause with but is thus contrasted is unexpressed, becoming implied in the framework or furnished by the situations.
    • often, as opposed to the declaration with which the clause with but is contrasted, an exclamation of shock, admiration, or any other strong sensation precedes, the term with then again expressing the floor of sensation.
    • versus: after comparatives.
    • Whenever.
    • [By further ellipsis and idiomatic deflection but features in contemporary English created a great selection of unique and remote utilizes produced by the preceding.] Synonyms However, Nevertheless, Nonetheless, etc. See nonetheless.
    • See butt.
    • See butt.
    • brief for abut. See butt.

Related Sources

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