tack definition

  • noun:
    • A short, light nail with a sharp point and a flat head.
    • Nautical A rope for keeping along the weather condition clew of a course.
    • Nautical A rope for hauling the outer reduced part of a studdingsail toward growth.
    • Nautical The part of a sail, such as the weather condition clew of a course, to which this line is fastened.
    • Nautical the reduced forward spot of a fore-and-aft sail.
    • Nautical the positioning of a vessel relative to the trim of their sails.
    • Nautical The work of switching from one position or course to a different.
    • Nautical the length or leg sailed between modifications of position or way.
    • a training course of activity designed to minimize opposition towards attainment of an objective.
    • a strategy, particularly one of some altering methods.
    • a big, free stitch made as a short-term binding or as a marker.
    • Stickiness, as compared to a newly coated surface.
    • meals, specifically coarse or substandard foodstuffs.
    • The harness for a horse, like the bridle and saddle.
    • A small nail with a-flat mind.
    • A thumbtack.
    • A loose seam accustomed briefly fasten bits of cloth.
    • the reduced part on top rated of a sail relative to the path associated with the wind.
    • A course or proceeding that enables a sailing vessel to go upwind. See also reach, gybe.
    • A direction or plan of action, specially a new one.
    • The maneuver by which a sailing vessel transforms its bow through wind so your wind modifications from 1 part to the other.
    • the length a sailing vessel operates between these maneuvers when working to windward; a board.
    • the different equipment and accessories worn by horses throughout their particular usage as domesticated animals. Saddles, stirrups, bridles, halters, reins, bits, harnesses, martingales, and breastplates are typical kinds of horse tack.
    • The stickiness of a compound, associated with its cohesive and adhesive properties.
    • A stain; a tache.
    • A peculiar flavor or taint.
    • A small, short, sharp-pointed nail, often having an easy, flat-head.
    • whatever is attached; a supplement; an appendix. See Tack, v. t., 3.
    • A rope accustomed hold in place the foremost reduced corners of the courses when the vessel is closehauled (see Illust. of Ship); additionally, a rope employed to pull the low corner of a studding sail into increase.
    • The element of a sail that the tack is usually fastened; the foremost lower part of fore-and-aft sails, at the time of schooners (see Illust. of Sail).
    • The way of a vessel in regard to the trim of her sails; ; -- the previous when she is closehauled using the wind on her behalf starboard side; therefore, the run of a vessel on one tack; also, an alteration of direction.
    • A contract through which employing something is defined, or allow, for hire; a lease.
    • Confidence; reliance.
    • Side: said of a speculator's commitment towards market.
    • a quick, sharp-pointed nail or pin, made use of as a fastener when you're driven or thrust-through the material is fastened in to the substance to which it's to-be fixed.
    • In needlework, an extended stitch, generally one of several intended to hold two items of things collectively, preparatory to even more thorough sewing. Compare basting.
    • Nautical: much rope regularly limit the foremost reduced place of courses; also, a rope through which the outer lower place of a studdingsail is pulled out to the termination of the growth.
    • The section of a sail to which the tack is fastened, the foremost lower corner of a course, jib, or staysail, or the outer reduced corner of a studdingsail.
    • ergo— The course of a ship concerning the career of her sails: since, the starboard tack, or interface tack (the previous when this woman is close-hauled with the wind on her starboard, the latter when close-hauled with all the wind on her port part).
    • a short-term modification of some things toward cruising, as to benefit from a side wind; one of some motions of a vessel to starboard and port alternately out of the basic distinct her program.
    • therefore A determinate training course or modification obviously generally; a tactical range or change of process; a mode of action or conduct used or pursued for a few certain explanation.
    • In plumbing system, the fastening of a pipe to a wall or the love, comprising a strip of lead soldered towards the pipeline, nailed to the help, and turned back within the nails.
    • Something that is connected or fixed positioned, or that holds, adheres, or sticks.
    • The condition of being tacked or fastened; stability; fixedness; firm grasp; reliance. See to hold tack, here.
    • when you look at the arts, an adhesive or sticky problem, by a partially dried out, varnished, painted, or oiled area; stickiness.
    • In Scots law, a contract where the application of something is let for hire; a lease: because, a tack of land.
    • therefore— Land occupied on rent; a rented farm.
    • Hired pasturage; the leasing of pasture for cattle.
    • an area; a stain; a blemish.
    • an exceptional style or flavor; an ongoing or abiding smack.
    • Substance; solidity: talked of this meals of cattle also stock.
    • Bad food.
    • Bad malt alcohol.
    • Food generally; fare: as, hard tack, coarse fare; soft tack, good fare.
    • particularly, among sailors, troops, etc., breads, or anything of loaves of bread sort, distinguished as hard tack (or hardtack) and smooth tack. See hardtack.
    • a number of pistol employed by the Highlanders of Scotland. See dag, 2.
    • (nautical) a line (rope or sequence) that regulates the direction at which a sail is scheduled in relation to the wind
    • (nautical) the work of changing tack
    • sailing a zigzag program
    • the proceeding or place of a vessel in accordance with the trim of its sails
    • equipment for a horse
    • a short nail with a sharp point and a sizable head
  • verb-transitive:
    • To fasten or attach with or as though with a tack: tacked the carpeting down.
    • To fasten or mark (cloth or a seam, for example) with a loose basting stitch.
    • to construct loosely and arbitrarily: tacked some tales collectively so as to compose a novel.
    • to include as an extra item; append: tacked two dollars on the bill.
    • Nautical to create (a vessel) into the wind in order to transform program or way.
    • To fasten or connect.
    • particularly, to attach or secure in a slight or hasty fashion, as by stitching or nailing
    • In parliamentary usage, to incorporate (a supplement) to a bill; to append; -- frequently with on or even.
    • to alter the way of (a vessel) when sailing closehauled, by placing the helm alee and shifting the tacks and sails making sure that she's going to go to windward almost at right perspectives to her previous course.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • Nautical to improve the course or course of a vessel: stand-by to tack.
    • Nautical to alter tack: The ship tacked to starboard.
    • To change one's course of action.
    • to improve the way of a vessel by shifting the positioning associated with helm and sails; in addition (as said of a vessel), to own her course changed through the shifting of helm and sails. See tack, v. t., 4.
  • verb:
    • To nail with a tack (small nail with a flat head).
    • To sew/stich with a tack (free seam accustomed briefly fasten pieces of cloth).
    • To maneuver a sailing vessel in order that its bow converts through wind, in other words. the wind changes from 1 region of the vessel to another.
    • to include one thing as an extra item.
    • frequently with "up"", to place the tack on a horse.
    • fasten with tacks
    • sew collectively loosely, with huge stitches
    • become the wind
    • fix to; attach
    • create by placing elements or members collectively
    • reverse (a direction, mindset, or course of action)
  • others:
    • To fasten by tacks; join, connect, or secure by some minor or short-term fastening: because, to tack down a carpet; to tack up a curtain; to tack a shoe into the last; to tack parts of a garment along with pins or by basting preparatory to stitching.
    • to install by some binding force; make a junction or union of; connect; combine: as, to tack a rider to a legislative bill; to tack two leases together.
    • In metal-working, to participate (pieces) by small spots of solder placed at periods to carry them in position before the final soldering may be finished.
    • To change the program of a ship when cruising because of the wind, by turning her mind toward the wind and bracing the yards round to ensure that she's going to sail on exact same direction because of the wind on the other side tack.
    • For this reason to alter an individual's training course; simply take a range or way; shift; veer.
    • To attack.

Related Sources

  • Definition for "tack"
    • A short, light nail with a sharp point…
    • View More
  • Sentence for "tack"
  • Etymologically Related for "tack"
  • Urban Dictionary for "tack"
    • North East england title for cannabis…
    • View More
  • Sports Dictionary for "tack"
1125 votes

How would you define tack?

All the definitions on AZdictionary were written by people just like you. Now's your chance to add your own!