sack definition

  • noun:
    • a sizable bag of strong coarse material for keeping things in bulk.
    • the same container of paper or synthetic.
    • extent that these types of a container holds.
    • a quick loose-fitting garment for women and children.
    • Slang Dismissal from employment: eventually got the sack after per year of ineptitude.
    • casual A bed, mattress, or fast asleep case.
    • Baseball A base.
    • Football a fruitful attempt at sacking the quarterback.
    • The looting or pillaging of a captured city or town.
    • Plunder; loot.
    • any one of numerous light, dried out, strong wines from Spain in addition to Canary Islands, imported to The united kingdomt in the 16th and seventeenth hundreds of years.
    • A bag; specifically a big case of strong, coarse material for storage space and control of varied products, such as for instance potatoes, coal, coffee; or, a bag with handles utilized at a supermarket, a grocery sack; or, a tiny case for small products, a satchel.
    • The amount a sack holds; in addition, an archaic or historic way of measuring differing capability, based product kind and based on neighborhood usage; a classic English measure of body weight, frequently of wool, corresponding to 13 rock (182 weight), or perhaps in other sources, 26 rock (364 pounds).
    • The plunder and pillaging of a captured city or city.
    • Loot or booty acquired by pillage.
    • an effective tackle associated with the quarterback. See verb sense3 here.
    • one of many square basics anchored to start with base, second base, or third base.
    • Dismissal from work, or release from a position, often as present (some one) the sack or have the sack. See verb sense4 the following.
    • Bed; usually as strike the sack or in the sack. See in addition sack out.
    • (also sacque) A kind of loose-fitting dress or gown with sleeves which hangs from the arms, such as for example a gown with a Watteau back or sack-back, stylish inside belated 17th to eighteenth century; or, previously, a loose-fitting hip-length coat, cloak or cape.
    • The scrotum.
    • many different light-colored dry wine from Spain and/or Canary isles; also, any powerful white wine from southern Europe; sherry.
    • A name formerly given to different dried out Spanish wines.
    • A bag for keeping and holding products of any sort; a receptacle manufactured from some kind of flexible product, as cloth, leather-based, and the like; a large pouch.
    • A measure of varying capability, according to regional usage and material. The United states sack of sodium is 215 pounds; the sack of grain, two bushels.
    • initially, a loosely holding apparel for women, worn like a cloak in regards to the arms, and offering as a decorative appendage to your gown; now, an outer apparel with sleeves, donned by women.
    • A sack layer; a kind of layer worn by men, and expanding throughout without a cross seam.
    • See 2d Sac, 2.
    • The pillage or plunder, as of a town or city; the storm and plunder of a town; devastation; ravage.
    • A bag; particularly, a sizable case, frequently manufactured from coarse hempen or linen cloth. (See sackcloth.) Sacks are acclimatized to include whole grain, flour, sodium, etc., potatoes alongside veggies, and coal.
    • A unit of dried out measure.
    • Sackcloth; sacking.
    • [Also spelled sacque.] A gown of a peculiar form that has been first introduced from France into The united kingdomt toward the close of seventeenth century, and stayed trendy through the greater area of the eighteenth, century.
    • The loose back itself. The word appears to have been utilized in this sense in eighteenth century.
    • [Also spelled sacque.] A kind of coat or brief layer, slashed round in the bottom, installing the human body just about closely, used presently day by both men and women: as, a sealskin sack; a sack-coat.
    • In anatomy and zoology, a sac or saccule.
    • The plundering of a city or town after storming and capture; plunder; pillage: as, the sack of Magdeburg.
    • The plunder or booty so gotten; spoil; loot.
    • initially, one of many strong light-colored wines delivered to England from the south, as from Spain additionally the Canary Islands, particularly those which were dry and harsh.
    • a lady's complete loose hiplength coat
    • any one of different light dry powerful white wine from Spain and Canary countries (including sherry)
    • the plundering of someplace by an army or mob; often involves destruction and slaughter
    • an enclosed room
    • a hanging sleep of fabric or rope netting (usually suspended between two woods); swings effortlessly
    • the number within a sack
    • a loose-fitting dress dangling straight from the arms without a waist
    • the cancellation of somebody's work (making them liberated to depart)
    • a bag manufactured from report or plastic for keeping consumer's purchases
  • verb-transitive:
    • to put into a sack.
    • Slang To discharge from employment. See Synonyms at dismiss.
    • Football To handle (a quarterback wanting to pass the baseball) behind the type of scrimmage.
    • To rob of products or valuables, particularly after capture.
    • to set up a sack; to bag.
    • To keep or carry in a sack upon the rear or perhaps the shoulders.
    • To plunder or pillage, as a town or town; to devastate; to ravage.
  • phrasal-verb:
    • sack out Slang to fall asleep.
  • verb:
    • to set up a sack or sacks.
    • To plunder or pillage, specifically after capture; to acquire spoils of war from.
    • To tackle, often to tackle the unpleasant quarterback behind the type of scrimmage before he is able to put a pass.
    • To discharge from work or position; to fire.
    • inside phrase sack away, to-fall asleep. See in addition strike the sack.
    • invest a sack
    • terminate the work of; discharge from an office or place
    • plunder (a town) after capture
    • make as a net profit
  • others:
    • to place into sacks or bags, for conservation or transportation: as, to sack grain or sodium.
    • To inclose as in a bag; cover or incase just like a sack.
    • To heap or pile as by sackfuls.
    • to provide the sack or bag to; release or discount from company, employment, etc.; in addition, to reject the match of: as, to sack a lover.
    • To plunder or pillage after storming and taking: since, to sack a property or a town.

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