off definition

  • adverb:
    • From somewhere or position: drove down.
    • At a specific distance in room or time: a mile off; a week down.
    • From a given training course or path; apart: swerved down into a ditch.
    • Into circumstances of unconsciousness: i need to have dozed off.
    • to be able to be no further on, connected, or linked: shaved off their mustache.
    • to be able to be divided: marked from the playing industry by yards.
    • to be able to be no more continuing, running, or operating: powered down the air.
    • in order to be entirely eliminated, done, or removed: kill off the mice.
    • to be able to be smaller, a lot fewer, or less: product sales dropped down.
    • in order to be from work or task: They took daily down.
    • Offstage.
    • In a direction away from the presenter or object.
    • Into a state of non-operation; into circumstances of non-existence.
    • In a broad feeling, denoting from or away from; as
    • Denoting distance or separation.
    • Denoting the action of removing or dividing; split
    • Denoting a leaving, abandonment, departure, abatement, disruption, or remission
    • Denoting another path; instead of or towards: away.
    • Denoting resistance or negation.
    • at a distance in area or time
    • no more on or in contact or affixed
    • from a particular thing or spot or place (`forth' is outdated)
  • adjective:
    • Distant or eliminated; further: the off side of the barn.
    • Remote; slim: stopped by from the off chance that they are home.
    • instead of, connected, or linked: with my shoes off.
    • Not running or operational: The range is off.
    • not taking place; canceled: the marriage is off.
    • Slack: Production had been off this season.
    • Not to standard; below a standard or satisfactory level: Your pitching is off today.
    • Not precise; wrong: Your analytical results are off.
    • notably crazy; eccentric: i believe see your face is a little down.
    • Started along the way; going: I'm off to look at president.
    • missing or from work or duty: she is down every Tuesday.
    • devoted far from work or responsibility: My off time is Saturday.
    • Being regarding the right side of an animal or car.
    • Being the animal or vehicle on right.
    • Nautical Farthest from the shore; seaward.
    • Sports Toward or designating the side for the area facing the batsman in cricket.
    • Off-color.
    • inoperative, disabled
    • rancid, rotten
    • in, or towards the 50 % of the area away from the batsman's feet; the best part for a right-handed batsman
    • under typical, in temperament or in outcome.
    • Circumstanced.
    • Started along the way.
    • On the further side; many distant; quietly of an animal or a team farthest from driver as he is by walking; in america, suitable side
    • Designating an occasion whenever one is maybe not purely attentive to business or affairs, or is absent from his post, and, ergo, a time when affairs aren't immediate.
    • Designating an occasion when your performance is below normal.
    • in an unpalatable state
    • maybe not doing or planned for tasks
    • (of activities) no longer prepared or planned
    • maybe not in operation or operational
    • below a satisfactory degree
  • preposition:
    • to be able to be removed or remote from: The bird hopped off the part.
    • Away or relieved from: off duty.
    • by eating: residing off locusts and honey.
    • using means given by: residing off my retirement.
    • Informal From: "What else do you want off me?” ( Jimmy Breslin).
    • expanding or branching out of: an artery off the heart.
    • Not up to the most common standard of: off their game.
    • to be able to refrain from: went off narcotics.
    • Nautical To seaward of: a mile off Sandy Hook.
    • Used to indicate movement from a posture on
    • from the ownership of.
    • from or not on.
    • Disconnected or subtracted from.
    • Distant from.
    • No longer wanting or using.
    • applied after lots (of services and products or components, like a unit), in trade or engineering.
    • Not on; far from
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To go away; keep: Off or we'll call the police.
  • verb-transitive:
    • Slang To murder.
  • idiom:
    • don and doff In an intermittent way: slept off and on yesterday evening.
  • verb:
    • To destroy.
    • to modify off.
    • kill deliberately and with premeditation
  • interjection:
    • Away; begone; -- a command to depart.
  • noun:
    • along side it associated with field which on the right regarding the wicket keeper.
    • Same as offing.
    • In cricket, that the main field towards bowler's remaining.
  • others:
    • At a point more or less remote; away.
    • Nautical: Away; obvious (since through the land, a danger, etc.): against on, onto, or toward.
    • Away (as from wind): in opposition to close, near, or up: since, to help keep a ship off a place or two.
    • Away; quite away (expressing movement, or even the work of departure or elimination); to a distance; such a fashion concerning drive or ward off; in another path (in opposition to toward): as, he went off; to conquer off an enemy; to push away personal bankruptcy; to wave off an intruder; to place off the bad day; to go down a danger; to choke down query; to laugh down an accusation; to look off.
    • from a particular place, link, attachment, or connection; away by actual treatment or split: as, to cut, pare, video, peel, pull, strip, or tear off; to lose an individual's cap; to mark off the length; to shake off a drowsy feeling.
    • [within good sense usually used in combination with ellipsis associated with verb (get, get, just take, etc.), and sometimes with with after.
    • in a way concerning interrupt continuity or progress; in order to end or cause a discontinuance: since, to break down negotiations; to go out of down work; to make off the gasoline.
    • Away; such a way on be or come to be abated or decreased: as, the fever begun to pass down; the need has fallen down.
    • very toward end; in order to complete; utterly; to exhaustion or extermination: a rigorous: as, to destroy down vermin; to drain off a swamp.
    • Forthwith; offhand: because, to rattle off a tale; to dash down a string of verses.
    • Nautical, on alternative tacks, today toward and from now on out of the land; to and fro.
    • look at verbs.
    • From; remote from.
    • instead of (a street or highway); leading from or away from.
    • Nautical, to seaward of at short-distance; other or abreast of to seaward: as, the ship ended up being off St. Lucia.
    • A way from; with separation or elimination from; whilst not is or sleep in: since, to take a novel off a shelf; he dropped down his horse; my eye is never off him; that treatment is off their mind: frequently pleonastically from down.
    • Deviating from, particularly from what exactly is typical or regular: since, from the mark; off the square; off the pitch (in music).
    • In a situation of not being engaged in or occupied with: as, he's off duty to-day.
    • From: showing supply: because, I bought this book off him.
    • Of: showing material: since, which will make dinner off seafood: also pleonastically away from.
    • By expansion, maybe not regarding the appropriate personality; perhaps not associated with the finest quality, reputation, etc.; particularly, equivocal or of skeptical morality, as an account or printing.
    • regarding kinds; indisposed.
    • Foolish; crazy.
    • More distant; further; ergo, as applied to horses, oxen, etc., driven in pairs abreast (the motorist's position becoming on left of them), correct; right-hand: in opposition to near or left-hand: as, the off side in operating; the off horse.
    • In cricket, on that side of the area that will be to the left associated with the bowler: against on. See drawing under cricket.
    • Leading from or far from a main range: placed on streets: as, we turned-out of Oxford road into an off street.
    • described as discontinuance or interruption of the which will be usual or regular; not occupied with or specialized in the typical business or affairs: as, this will be an off time; off time; an off year (in usa politics, a-year which no important elections happen).
    • a means through the mark or right way; mistaken; incorrect: because, you might be rather off in that matter. [Colloq.]
    • Conditioned; circumstanced.
    • Away! depart! begone!
    • Nautical, to maneuver off shore; steer through the land: said of a ship, and utilized just in the present participle: since, the vessel had been offing at the time the accident happened.
    • An abbreviation. See Of.

Related Sources

  • Definition for "off"
    • From somewhere or position: drove down.
    • View More
  • Sentence for "off"
  • Quotes for "off"
  • Cross Reference for "off"
  • Form for "off"
    • English words derived from: off (adverb)
    • View More
  • Urban Dictionary for "off"
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