• Definition for "o"
    • The 15th page associated with contemporary English alphabet.
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  • Sentence for "o"
    • Without referring to geometry we can…
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  • Quotes for "o"
    • "O sweet, delusive Noon, Which the…"
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  • Cross Reference for "o"
  • Urban Dictionary for "o"

o definition

  • noun:
    • The 15th page associated with contemporary English alphabet.
    • Any of the message appears represented by the page o.
    • The fifteenth in a string.
    • some thing shaped such as the page O.
    • one of many four significant blood groups into the ABO system. Those with this blood group have actually neither A nor B antigens on the surface of the red bloodstream cells, and have now both anti-A and anti-B antibodies within their blood serum.
    • A zero.
    • The fifteenth letter of the standard contemporary Latin alphabet.
    • close-mid back rounded vowel
    • The fifteenth page of this English alphabet, labeled as o and written in the Latin script.
    • The ordinal number fifteenth, produced by this page associated with English alphabet, labeled as o and printed in the Latin script.
    • title of Latin script letter O/o.
    • A zero (used in reading out figures).
    • The letter O, or its noise.
    • anything shaped just like the letter O; a circle or oval.
    • A cipher; zero.
    • An exclamation or lamentation.
    • just like ho.
    • the 15th letter for the Roman alphabet
    • a nonmetallic bivalent element that is normally a colorless odorless tasteless nonflammable diatomic fuel; constitutes 21 percent of atmosphere by amount; many abundant take into account the earth's crust
    • the blood team whose red cells carry neither the A nor B antigens
  • interjection:
    • The English vocative particle, made use of before a pronoun and/or title of one or persons to mark direct address.
    • alternate kind of oh.
    • An exclamation used in phoning or right addressing people or personified item; in addition, as an emotional or impassioned exclamation expressing discomfort, grief, surprise, desire, anxiety, etc.
  • abbreviation:
    • Operator
    • Object, see SVO
    • Over
  • others:
    • O, the fifteenth page associated with English alphabet, derives its kind, price, and title from Greek O, through the Latin. The letter came into the Greek through the Phœnician, which possibly derived it eventually through the Egyptian. Etymologically, the page o is most closely related to a, e, and u; such as E. bone tissue, AS. bān; E. rock, AS. stān; E. broke, AS. brecan to split; E. bore, AS. beran to keep; E. dove, AS. dūfe; E. toft, tuft; tone, track; number, F. nombre.
    • Among the list of ancients, O had been a mark of triple time, from the notion the ternary, or # 3, is one of perfect of figures, and properly expressed by a circle, the ideal figure.
    • The fifteenth page and fourth vowel within alphabet.
    • It hence appears that the belief, perhaps not uncommonly held, that O represents, and it is imitated from, the rounded position of this mouth in its utterance, is a delusion. The historical value of the letter (as already observed) is of our o, in note, etc., whether of both long and short amounts, as in Latin in addition to very first Greek, or of brief only, like in Greek following the inclusion to this alphabet of a special sign for long o (specifically omega, Ω, ω). This vowel-sound, the name-sound of o, is found in English use only with lengthy quantity in accented syllables. There's absolutely no closely corresponding quick vowel in standard English, but just in dialectal pronunciation, as with the newest England utterance of certain words (much differing in quantity in numerous individuals): for instance, home, entire, none. Everything we call “short o” (in maybe not, on, etc.) is a sound of entirely various high quality, really in close proximity to a true short ä (which, a quick utterance equivalent towards the a of arm, dad), but verging somewhat toward the “broad” a (â) or o (ô) of laud, lord. “Short o” has actually a marked habit of undertake a “broader” sound, specifically before r, and particularly in the usa: therefore the employment, in the respellings of the work, of ô, which differs in numerous mouths from the full sound of â to that particular of ŏ. After these three values regarding the personality, the second most frequent one is that of the oo-sonnd, the initial and correct sound of u (represented within work by ö), such as move, because of the almost matching brief noise (noticeable u) in some terms, as wolf, girl. These vowel-sounds partake of understanding typically called a “labial” or a “rounded” personality: frankly, discover associated with their utterance a rounding and shutting action of mouth (and, it really is held, of this entire mouth-cavity), in various degrees — least of all in ŏ, more in â, ō, u, ö; within the last, transported to its extreme, no closer rounding and approximation becoming feasible. The labial activity helps you to supply the vowel-sounds in question their completely unique character; but it can be more or less slighted without leaving all of them unrecognizable, and, when you look at the usually indifferent practice of English pronunciation, is within a degree ignored, even in accented syllables, yet much more in unaccented. Our “long ō,” it should be added, frequently ends with a vanishing noise of oo (ö), as our ā with one of ē. O even offers in a lot of terms the worth for the “neutral” vowels of hut, harm: like, in child, come, love, work. O is further a part of several common and essential digraphs: hence, oo, probably the most noticeable representative of the ö-sound (in moon, rood, etc.), but also pronounced as u (book, look, etc.) and ŭ (bloodstream, etc.); ou (in certain situations ow), oftenest representing a genuine diphthong (in out, sound, today, etc.), additionally multiple other sounds (as in through, could, need, rough); oi (in a few circumstances oy), standing for a genuine diphthongal noise of which initial element may be the “broad” o- or a-sound (as an example, point, boy); oa (load, etc.), obtaining the “long” o-sound; others, as eo (variously pronounced, as in people, yeoman, jeopard), oe (in foe, does, etc.), tend to be relatively rare.
    • As a medieval Roman numeral, 11.
    • As symbolic: In medieval musical notation, the hallmark of the tempus perfectum — this is certainly, of triple rhythm. See mensurable music, under mensurable.
    • In modern music notation, a null (which see)
    • In chem., the image of air.
    • In reasoning, the icon regarding the certain bad idea. See A, -
    • An abbreviation: Of old: since, in O. H. G., Old tall German; O. T., Old Testament.
    • Of the center Latin octavius, a pint.
    • [lowercase] In a ship's log-book, of overcast.
    • Pl. o's, oes (ōz). Something circular or roughly therefore, as resembling the design associated with page o, as a spangle, the group of a theater, the planet earth, etc.
    • An arithmetical cipher; zero: so called from its kind.
    • A common interjection articulating shock, pain, gladness, attraction, entreaty, invocation, lament, etc., according to the manner of utterance and situations of this instance.
    • An abbreviated form of on. Commonly written o'.
    • identical to one.
    • Same as a, the indefinite article.
    • An abbreviated type of of, now commonly written o'.
    • A prefix common in Irish surnames, equal to Mac-in Gaelic and Irish surnames (see Mac), meaning ‘son,’ as with O'Brien, O'Connor, O'Donnell, O'Sullivan, son of Brien, Connor, Donnell, etc.
    • The usual “connecting vowel,” properly the stem-vowel of the first element, of compound words taken or formed from the Greek, as in acr-o-lith, chrys-o-prase, mon-o-tone, prot-o-martyr, etc.
    • An abbreviation
    • in electrical energy, of ohm;
    • of Ohio;
    • of only;
    • of opening of the circuit;
    • in psychology, of observer.
  • adjective:
    • One.
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