• Definition for "mode"
    • a fashion, method, or approach to performing or…
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  • Sentence for "mode"
    • Something was said of the propriety…
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    • In computer screen design, a mode
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mode definition

  • noun:
    • a fashion, method, or approach to performing or acting: modern settings of travel. See Synonyms at strategy.
    • A particular type, variety, or way: a mode of phrase.
    • A given condition of performance; a status: The spacecraft was in its recovery mode.
    • The current or customary manner or design. See Synonyms at style.
    • Music some of specific fixed plans of the diatonic tones of an octave, as major and minor machines of Western music.
    • songs A patterned arrangement, since the one feature associated with music of traditional Greece or perhaps the medieval Christian Church.
    • Philosophy the appearance, kind, or manner in which an underlying material, or a permanent aspect or characteristic of it, is manifested.
    • Logic See modality.
    • Logic The arrangement or purchase regarding the propositions in a syllogism based on both high quality and amount.
    • Statistics the worthiness or item occurring most frequently in a series of findings or analytical data.
    • Mathematics the amount or array of figures in a collection that occurs the essential usually.
    • Geology The mineral composition of a sample of igneous stone.
    • Physics some of numerous patterns of wave motion or vibration.
    • Grammar Mood.
    • One of several ancient machines, among which corresponds to the modern-day major scale and something into natural small scale
    • A particular ways accomplishing one thing.
    • the essential regularly occurring price in a distribution
    • a situation of something that is represented by an eigenfunction of that system.
    • among various related units of guidelines for handling data.
    • Style or manner.
    • types of performing or being; method; form; style; custom; means; style
    • Prevailing popular customized; manner, particularly in the phrase the mode.
    • Variety; gradation; degree.
    • Any combination of characteristics or relations, considered apart from the substance to which they belong, and managed as entities; even more typically, condition, or state to be; manner or kind of arrangement or manifestation; kind, as opposed to matter.
    • the shape in which the proposition connects the predicate and topic, whether by easy, contingent, or required assertion; the form of the syllogism, as dependant on the number and top-notch the constituent idea; mood.
    • Same as Mood.
    • The scale as suffering from the different opportunities inside of minor intervals; , of ancient greek language songs.
    • A kind of silk. See Alamode, n.
    • the worth of the adjustable in a frequency circulation or probability circulation, at which the likelihood or regularity features a maximum. The maximum may be regional or worldwide. Distributions with only one these types of maximum are known as unimodal; with two maxima, bimodal, along with more than two, multimodal.
    • A manner of acting or doing; means of doing or effecting such a thing; technique; method.
    • Customary way; prevailing style; fashion.
    • In sentence structure, the designation, because of the form of the verb, of this method of our conception of a conference or reality, whether as certain, contingent, possible, desirable, and/or like.
    • The all-natural personality or perhaps the manner of existence or activity of everything; a form: as, temperature is a mode of motion; reflection is a mode of awareness.
    • a variety of a few ideas. Look at quotations.
    • In logic:
    • an adjustment or dedication of a proposition with regards to possibility and necessity.
    • many different syllogism. See feeling, the greater typical but less correct kind.
    • The consignificate of part of address.
    • An accidental determination.
    • In music:
    • A species or as a type of scale; a method of dividing the interval associated with octave for melodic functions; an arrangement of shades within an octave at certain fixed intervals from each other.
    • These modes were embodied in scales of about two octaves, occasionally called transposing scales, which were pretty much vulnerable of transposition. By the subsequent theorists fifteen such scales were acknowledged, each based on one of several foregoing modes, and starting at adifferent pitch, each a half-step higher than the preceding. These scales, though not always differing from each other in mode, but only in general pitch, had been also known as settings, and were called like settings themselves. Presuming the lowest tone associated with cheapest scale is A, the number of later on machines or “modes” would be:
    • Hypodorian, embodying mode IV. overhead, A.
    • Hypoionian, Hypoiastian, or lower Hypophrygian (mode V.), B♭.
    • Hypophrygian (mode V.), B.
    • Hypoæolian, or reduced Hypolydian (mode VI.), C.
    • Hypolydian (mode VI.), C♮.
    • Dorian (mode I.), D.
    • Ionian, Iastian, or reduced Phrygian (mode II.), E♭.
    • Phrygian (mode II.), E.
    • Æolian, or reduced Lydian (mode III.), F.
    • Lydian (mode III.), F♮.
    • Hyperdorian, or Mixolydian (mode VII.), G.
    • Hyperionian, Hyperiastian, or maybe more Mixolydian (mode VII.), G♮.
    • Hyperphrygian, or Hypermixolydian (mode VIII.), A.
    • Hyperæolian, or lower Hyperlydian (mode IX.), B♭.
    • Hyperlydian (mode IX.), B.
    • that the word mode is used from very early times both into perfect octave-forms, or real modes, and to the useful scales or tonalities in relation to all of them has led to great confusion. Additionally, the extant data associated with the topic are fragmentary and obscure, in order that authorities vary commonly. (The summary right here provided is taken mainly from Alfred Richter.) The esthetic and ethical value of different settings had been much discussed because of the Greeks, and melodies had been written in one or any other for the modes in accordance with the sentiment meant to be expressed.
    • The Gregorian, medieval, or ecclesiastical system had been initially intended partly to check out the old system. A number of the old settings wore retained, but afterwards obtained curiously transposed brands. The machine ended up being started by Ambrose, Bishop of Milan, when you look at the second part of the 4th century, mastered by Gregory the fantastic about 600, but still further extended between your eleventh and sixteenth hundreds of years. It exercised a deep impact upon the origins of modern-day music, and is however in use when you look at the Roman Catholic Church. The ecclesiastical settings vary from one another both in the relative place of these “finals” or key-notes plus in the order of their entire tips and half-steps. They're genuine when the last may be the most affordable tone of this ambitus or compass, and plagal when it's the fourth tone from base. Four genuine modes were founded by Ambrose, the four corresponding plagal settings were included by Gregory, and six other people were afterwards appended, making fourteen in every. In each mode certain tones tend to be considered to be specially essential — the final, which every melody must end, and which is almost equivalent to the current key-note; the principal, or major reciting-note; plus the mediant and participant, where phrases (except that the initial and last) can start and end: they're generically called modulations. Most of the modes tend to be prone of transposition. Assuming the last of first mode becoming A, the total show can be follows (finals are marked F, dominants D,) and mediants M):
    • *Not made use of, due to the tritone between B and F.
    • inside contemporary system just two associated with the historical modes are retained — the main, equivalent to the Greek Lydian therefore the medieval Ionian, as well as the minor (in its full-form), comparable to the Greek and medieval Æolian. These modes change from one another in the order of their particular entire tips and half-steps, below:
    • See major, minor, and scale.
    • In medieval songs, a phrase where the relative time-value or rhythmic connection of notes was indicated.
    • Measure; melody; harmony.
    • In lace-making:
    • a silly attractive stitch or style, characteristic associated with structure of every unique sort of lace; particularly, a tiny piece of these types of attractive work placed within the structure of lace.
    • The filling of openwork meshes and/or want amongst the solid areas of the structure.
    • A garment for ladies's wear, obviously a mantle with a hood, used in The united kingdomt inside eighteenth century.
    • plural when you look at the philosophy of Locke. See def. 5
    • Synonyms Method, Method, etc. (identify fashion), procedure.
    • A Middle English form of feeling.
    • In mathematics:
    • the essential frequent measure; the course with biggest frequency.
    • The point at which a curve, indicating frequencies of occurrence of a variable event, reaches its maximum. In the normal frequency curve (see Quételet's curve), the average is at the same time the mode, while in skew curves the average and mode do not coincide.
    • In a table of frequencies gives a summary of the various quantities showing up, with a statement for the range times that each and every appeared, one which does occur usually.
    • In biom., that statistical value of a character which will be most commonplace in a small grouping of organisms.
    • In petrography, into the quantitative classification of igneous rocks (see stone), the actual mineral structure of a rock in distinction through the norm, with which it might probably or may not coincide.
    • a specific functioning problem or arrangement
    • just how one thing is performed or how it occurs
    • the essential regular value of a random adjustable
    • verb inflections that express how the activity or condition is conceived because of the speaker
    • a classification of propositions on the basis of whether or not they claim need or possibility or impossibility
    • some of different fixed instructions of the numerous diatonic records within an octave
  • others:
    • To conform to the mode or style: with an indefinite it.
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