kick definition

  • verb-intransitive:
    • To strike out using base or legs.
    • Sports To score or gain ground by throwing a ball.
    • Sports To punt in baseball.
    • Sports To propel your body in cycling by going the feet, as with a flutter kick or frog kick.
    • To recoil: The powerful rifle kicked upon becoming fired.
    • Informal To express bad feelings vigorously; whine.
    • Informal To oppose by debate; protest.
    • To push out the foot or feet with assault; to strike out utilizing the foot or foot, like in defense or in bad temperament; esp., to strike backwards, as a horse does, or even have a habit to do so.
    • To recoil; -- said of a musket, cannon, etc.; also known as kick back.
    • to help make a kick as an offensive play.
    • To grumble strenuously; to object vigorously.
    • To withstand.
  • verb-transitive:
    • To strike because of the base.
    • To propel by hitting using base.
    • To spring straight back against instantly: The rifle kicked my shoulder whenever I fired it.
    • Sports To score (a target or point) by throwing a ball.
    • To strike, push, or hit violently with all the foot
    • To evict or remove from someplace or place, often without or down.
    • To get (targets or points) by kicking.
    • To discontinue; -- frequently made use of of habitual activities.
  • noun:
    • A vigorous blow using the foot.
    • Sports The movement associated with legs that propels the human body in cycling.
    • A jolting recoil: a rifle with much kick.
    • Slang A complaint; a protest.
    • Slang Power; power: a motor vehicle engine with lots of kick.
    • Slang a sense of enjoyable stimulation: got a kick out of the show.
    • Slang Fun: moved bowling just for kicks.
    • Slang Temporary, frequently obsessive interest: I'm on a science fiction kick.
    • Slang an abrupt, striking shock; a twist.
    • Sports The act or a case of kicking a ball.
    • Sports A kicked basketball.
    • Sports the length spanned by a kicked basketball.
    • popular or strike using the leg or base or knee.
    • The activity of swinging a foot or leg.
    • something which tickles the fancy; something fun or amusing.
    • The removal of a person from an on-line task.
    • A button (of a joypad, joystick or similar product) whoever just or primary present purpose is that if it is pressed triggers a video game character to kick.
    • Any bucking movement of an object that does not have legs or feet.
    • piquancy
    • A stimulation supplied by an intoxicating compound.
    • A pass played by kicking aided by the foot.
    • The distance traveled by throwing the basketball.
    • a recoil of a gun.
    • pocket
    • a rise in speed when you look at the last section of a running competition.
    • A blow using foot or legs; a striking or thrust using the base.
    • The projection on the tang of blade of a pocket knife, which stops the side of the blade from striking the spring. See Illust. of Pocketknife.
    • A projection in a mold, to form a depression within the surface of this brick.
    • The recoil of a musket or other firearm, whenever released.
    • A surge of enjoyment; a-thrill; -- generally utilized in the expression get a kick regarding.
    • A blow or push because of the base.
    • In foot-ball: The right of or a turn at throwing the ball, one that kicks or kicks off.
    • The recoil of a firearm when released.
    • A sudden and strong objection; unforeseen opposition.
    • The projection in the tang for the blade of a pocket-knife through which the knife is avoided from hitting the spring within the work of finishing.
    • A cleat or block regarding stock-board of a brick-molders' workbench, which serves to create a key inside brick.
    • A die for bricks.
    • Fashion; novelty; thing in vogue.
    • The indentation or internal protuberance of a molded cup bottle.
    • plural pants. [Slang, Eng.]
    • In archery, the unsteady movement of an arrow at the beginning of its journey caused by the faulty drawing or loosing associated with bow.
    • In electricity, a high-voltage current or release of brief timeframe showing up in inductive electric circuits whenever conditions associated with circuit are altered, especially when it's exposed.
    • the unexpected stimulation supplied by powerful beverage (or certain medications)
    • casual terms for objecting
    • the quick release of a shop of affective power
    • the act of delivering a blow using foot
    • a rhythmic thrusting motion for the feet as with cycling or calisthenics
    • the backward jerk of a gun when it's fired
  • phrasal-verb:
    • kick-about To move from place to spot.
    • kick around Informal to deal with defectively; punishment.
    • kick around Informal To move from place to place: "spent the next three years in Italy, kicking around the country on a motor scooter” ( Charles E. Claffey).
    • kick around Informal To give thought or consideration to; ponder or discuss.
    • relax To recoil unexpectedly and violently.
    • kick back Informal To go on it effortless; relax: kicked straight back home and watched TV.
    • kick back Slang To return (taken things).
    • relax Slang To pay a kickback.
    • activate Informal To contribute (one's share): kicked in a few dollars when it comes to company celebration.
    • activate Informal In Order To Become operative or take result: "Their pituitary kicked in, along with his development was out of the blue vertical” ( Kenneth Browser).
    • kick in Slang To perish.
    • start up Sports to start or resume have fun with a kickoff.
    • kick off casual to begin with; start: kicked off the promotional tour with a press seminar.
    • start up Slang To perish.
    • kick out Slang To throw out; dismiss.
    • kick over To begin to fire: The engine finally banged over.
    • kick-up Informal to improve in quantity or power; intensify: A sandstorm kicked up although we drove through the desert.
    • kick up Informal To stir up (trouble): kicked up a row.
    • kick up Informal To show signs and symptoms of disorder: their ulcer features kicked up again.
  • idiom:
    • ass Vulgar Slang To just take forceful or harsh steps to quickly attain a target.
    • kick the container Slang To perish.
    • give up smoking Slang To release oneself of an addiction, concerning narcotics or cigarettes.
    • kick up (one's) heels Informal To cast-off a person's inhibitions and have a very good time.
    • kick upstairs Slang to market to a higher yet less desirable place.
  • verb:
    • To strike or strike utilizing the base or other extremity of this leg.
    • which will make a sharp jerking activity for the leg, as to hit anything.
    • To direct to a particular spot by a blow because of the base or knee.
    • To eject summarily.
    • to get rid of a participant from an online activity.
    • To overcome (a bothersome or hard problem or obstacle); to free onself of (difficulty).
    • To move or press suddenly and violently.
    • To recoil; to press by recoiling.
    • To die.
    • express grievances, discontent, displeasure, or unhappiness
    • kick a leg up
    • springtime straight back, as from a forceful thrust
    • end ingesting
    • drive or propel using the base
    • attack aided by the foot
    • thrash about or strike out using the legs
    • make a goal
  • others:
    • to provide a thrust or blow to aided by the foot; strike utilizing the foot: as, to kick your dog; to kick an obstruction away from your means.
    • To hit in recoiling: since, an overloaded weapon kicks the neck.
    • In printing, to use or impact by influence associated with the base on a treadle: used with regards to some kinds of small job-presses: as, to kick a Gordon press; to kick-off one thousand impressions.
    • To sting, as a wasp. [Prov. Eng.]—
    • To reject, as a suitor; jilt. [Vulgar, south U. S.]
    • To strike out with the foot; have the habit of hitting using the base: as, a horse that kicks.
    • To thrust out of the foot with assault, like in wantonness, weight, anger, or contempt.
    • therefore To manifest resistance or powerful objection; provide resistance.
    • To recoil, as a musket or any other firearm.—
    • To stammer.
    • In cricket, to cause (the baseball) after pitching to go up more than typical: said of this bowler, also associated with ground and/or wicket.
    • In cricket, to increase after being bowled more than normal from the pitch; bump: stated associated with basketball.

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