judgment definition

  • noun:
    • The work or means of judging; the forming of an opinion after consideration or deliberation.
    • The psychological capability to view and distinguish connections; discernment: Fatigue may influence a pilot's wisdom of distances.
    • the capability to develop an impression by differentiating and evaluating: their view of good songs is impeccable.
    • The capacity to assess situations or conditions and draw sound conclusions; good sense: She revealed good wisdom in preserving her money. See Synonyms at reason.
    • An opinion or estimation formed after consideration or deliberation, particularly a formal or authoritative decision: anticipated the wisdom of the umpire.
    • Law A determination of a court of law; a judicial choice.
    • Law A court act creating or affirming an obligation, like a debt.
    • legislation A writ in experience of such an act.
    • An assertion of some thing believed.
    • A misfortune considered to be sent by God as punishment for sin.
    • The Very Last Judgment.
    • The work of judging.
    • The power or faculty of performing such operations; especially, when unqualified, the faculty of judging or deciding rightly, justly, or wisely; as, a man of judgment; a politician without judgment.
    • the final outcome or outcome of judging; a viewpoint; a decision.
    • The work of identifying, as in process of law of law, what is conformable to legislation and justice; in addition, the dedication, choice, or phrase of a court, or of a judge.
    • the last honor; the final sentence.
    • The work of judging; the procedure for the brain, concerning comparison and discrimination, where an understanding associated with the values and relations of things, whether of ethical characteristics, intellectual principles, logical propositions, or material realities, is gotten
    • the ability or professors of performing these types of functions (see 1); esp., whenever unqualified, the professors of judging or determining appropriately, justly, or sensibly; common sense
    • the final outcome or consequence of judging; an opinion; a decision.
    • The act of determining, such as courts of law, what is conformable to law and justice; also, the dedication, choice, or sentence of a court, or of a judge; the mandate or sentence of God since the judge of.
    • That work associated with the brain by which two notions or some ideas which are apprehended as distinct tend to be in comparison for the true purpose of ascertaining their agreement or disagreement. See 1. The contrast might threefold: (1) Of specific objects creating an idea. (2) Of concepts giving what's officially known as a judgment. (3) Of two judgments providing an inference. Judgments have now been more classed as analytic, synthetic, and identical.
    • That power or faculty wherein knowledge based mostly on comparison and discrimination is acquired. See 2.
    • A calamity seen as sent by Jesus, by way of recompense for incorrect committed; a providential discipline.
    • the ultimate award; the past sentence.
    • The faculty of judging.
    • Specifically— The intellectual power of perceiving relations between ideas, as the relations of similarity, difference, etc.
    • The work of judging. The work of affirming (or doubting) a relation (as of similarity or huge difference) between two a few ideas.
    • the entire process of reaching a conclusion or choice; the dedication of a doubtful or debatable matter.
    • this product for the emotional act of judging; the recognition of a relation between items; a mental affirmation or proposition; the idea that certain general representation is really relevant to a certain object; the awareness of belief.
    • The decision of a judge, or of just one acting as a judge; an authoritative dedication; particularly, the judicial choice of a cause in judge; adjudication; honor; sentence.
    • especially— the dedication associated with the legal rights associated with the parties in a common-law activity, as distinguished from a decree in chancery
    • the dedication of legal rights for the events in almost any action, appropriate or fair, beneath the reformed process
    • the document embodying these types of dedication. When those rights have been conceded, or established by evidence, and it also only continues to be to compel compliance using the wisdom, the wisdom is known as final. If before enforcing the judgment it is important to simply take procedures to determine the application of these legal rights—as, for-instance, to take an accounting, or to change lands or chattels into money for the true purpose of division—the determination of this rights of functions initially had is an interlocutory view or decree; and after these types of further procedures are had the court gives your final view or decree, which is often straight away implemented.
    • a viewpoint formed or help with; a conclusion attracted from premises; a determination centered on observation or belief; an estimate; a view.
    • A divine allotment or dispensation; a decree or commandment of God; particularly, a meeting or knowledge regarded as an immediate manifestation of this divine will, especially of divine displeasure.
    • The final test associated with the human race later on state; the judgment-day.
    • See the adjectives.
    • thus— In modern-day practice, the papers (usually the process grievance, response, decision or results and view thereon) fastened and folded together, and submitted whilst the record of the wisdom.
    • Synonyms Judgment, Sagacity, Perspicacity; discrimination, penetration, knowledge, brains. Judgment, in comparison with sagacity and perspicacity, is a general word: as, sound wisdom running a business; great wisdom regarding cloths. Sagacity is a power to discern the actual facts of a predicament, to start to see the program that's wisest in order to avoid failure or be successful. (See astute.) Sagacity is especially the phrase put on brutes which have a sizable discernment and a quickness of head like those of man. Perspicacity is essentially the same as discernment, except that it's much more clearly figurative, recommending the specific use of the eyes in looking at things. See discernment. Verdict, Report, etc. See decision and inference.- Taste, Judgment (see style); opinion, belief, summary.
    • the cognitive procedure of achieving a choice or drawing conclusions
    • the appropriate document saying the reason why for a judicial decision
    • a viewpoint created by judging some thing
    • the work of judging or evaluating someone or situation or event
    • the capacity to examine circumstances or conditions shrewdly also to draw sound conclusions
    • (legislation) the dedication by a court of skilled jurisdiction on things submitted to it
    • the emotional ability to understand and discriminate between relations

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