hawk definition

  • noun:
    • Any of various birds of victim associated with purchase Falconiformes and especially of genera Accipiter and Buteo, characteristically having a short hooked bill and powerful claws adjusted for seizing.
    • Any of various comparable wild birds of prey.
    • an individual who preys on other individuals; a shark.
    • a person who shows an actively aggressive or combative mindset, as with a disagreement.
    • an individual who favors military power or activity to complete international policy.
    • An audible effort to clear the neck by expelling phlegm.
    • A diurnal predatory bird of family members Accipitridae.
    • An advocate of aggressive governmental roles.
    • A plasterer's device, made of a flat surface with a handle below, always hold an amount of plaster prior to application into the wall surface or roof being worked on: a mortarboard.
    • an endeavor to make up phlegm from throat, accompanied with noise.
    • One of numerous species and genera of rapacious wild birds of this family Falconidæ. They differ from the true falcons in lacking the prominent tooth and notch associated with the bill, as well as in having reduced much less pointed wings. Lots of people are of large size and class to the eagles. Some, whilst the goshawk, had been formerly trained like falcons. In a more basic sense the term is not infrequently used, in addition, to true falcons, as sparrow hawk, pigeon hawk, duck hawk, and prairie hawk.
    • an endeavor to force up phlegm through the neck, accompanied with sound.
    • a little board, with a handle from the under side, to keep mortar.
    • A diurnal bird of prey which cannot constantly feed upon carrion: compared with owl along with vulture.
    • With a specifying term, some bird that hawks because of its prey on the wing.
    • Synonyms Hawk, Falcon. Hawk is the most general and indefinite name of a bird of prey. It seems to have at first distinguished the birds so designated from carrion-feeding kinds and from those that prey by night (vultures and owls), and then to have been applied to those which could be trained—that is, used in the sport of hawking or falconry. Its nearest synonym is falcon; and since all hawks were formerly placed in one genus, Falco, hawk and falcon became interchangeable book-names for most members of the family Falconidæ. But, again, the hawks used in falconry were of two series, respectively designated noble and ignoble, corresponding to two technical subfamilies of Falconidæ. The name falcon became, therefore, technically restricted to the former of these series, the subfamily Falconinæ, while hawk was coincidently applied to the other, Accipitrinæ, alone.
    • An effort to improve phlegm from the neck.
    • In building, a tiny quadrangular board with a handle underneath, utilized by plasterers to keep the mortar.
    • A double-hooked tool for attracting or moving towards fabric when you look at the dyeing-liquor of a hawking-machine.
    • diurnal bird of victim typically having quick curved wings and an extended end
    • an advocate of an aggressive policy on foreign relations
    • a square board with a handle underneath; employed by masons to carry or carry mortar
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To hunt with skilled hawks.
    • To swoop and strike in the manner of a hawk: "It was fun to watch the scattered snail kites . . . lifting and falling when you look at the wind because they hawked over the shining lawn and liquid” ( Peter Matthiessen).
    • To peddle products aggressively, specifically by calling away.
    • To clear or make an effort to clear the throat by or as if by coughing up phlegm.
    • To capture, or attempt to get, wild birds in the shape of hawks trained for the purpose, and cut loose on the victim; to practice falconry.
    • to help make an attack while on the wing; to rise and strike like a hawk; -- usually with inside.
    • To clear the throat with an audible sound by forcing an expiratory present of atmosphere through slim passage involving the despondent smooth palate additionally the base of the tongue, therefore aiding in removal of international substances.
  • verb-transitive:
    • To peddle (goods) aggressively, specifically by phoning away.
    • To clear the neck of (phlegm).
    • to improve by hawking, as phlegm.
    • available available by outcry in the street; to hold (merchandise) about from location to location for purchase; to peddle.
  • verb:
    • To hunt with a hawk.
    • to market.
    • To forcibly attempt to cough up (phlegm).
    • To clear the neck loudly.
    • offer or offer on the market from place to spot
    • search with hawks
    • clear mucus or food from one's neck
  • others:
    • To hunt wild birds or tiny animals through hawks or falcons trained with the aim; practise hawking; engage in falconry.
    • To travel in the way of hawk; rise; take victim in the air.
    • to provide obtainable by outcry in a street or other general public place, or from door to door; communicate through town or country available: as, to hawk brooms or ballads.
    • which will make an endeavor to boost phlegm from the throat.
    • to boost by hawking: since, to hawk up phlegm.
    • to attract or even pull with a hawk, as cloth through the dye-vat of a hawking-machine.

Related Sources

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