hall definition

  • noun:
    • A corridor or passageway in a building.
    • A large entrance area or vestibule in a building; a lobby.
    • A building for public gatherings or entertainments.
    • the big room in which such fucntions are held.
    • A building utilized for the meetings, entertainments, or residing quarters of a fraternity, sorority, chapel, or other social or spiritual organization.
    • A building owned by a school, college, or institution providing you with classroom, dormitory, or dining facilities.
    • a sizable room this kind of a building.
    • The set of pupils utilizing these types of a building: the whole hall remained up late studying.
    • Chiefly British A meal served this kind of a building.
    • the primary household on a landed estate.
    • The palace or home of a medieval monarch or noble.
    • the key area this kind of a castle or household, utilized for dining, entertaining, and sleeping.
    • A corridor; a hallway.
    • A meeting space.
    • A manor house.
    • A building providing pupil accommodation at a university.
    • the key space of a secular medieval building.
    • A building or room of considerable dimensions and stateliness, employed for general public functions.
    • the principle area in a castle or manor-house, plus very early times the only general public area, serving while the place of gathering for the lord's household with the retainers and servants, in addition for cooking and eating. It had been usually compared aided by the bower, that was the exclusive or fast asleep apartment.
    • A vestibule, entrance area, etc., inside even more elaborated structures of later times.
    • Any corridor or passage in a building.
    • A name given to numerous manor homes due to the fact magistrate's judge happened within the hall of his mansion; a chief mansion-house.
    • A college in an English college (at Oxford, an unendowed university).
    • The apartment in which English institution students dine in keeping; thus, the supper it self.
    • Cleared passageway in a crowd; -- formerly an exclamation.
    • A building, or a large area or area in a building, specialized in some general public or common use: in a variety of unique applications. See the following.
    • particularly — In medieval palaces and castles, the primary room, often the just living-room. Besides the hallway, in very very early times, in the best houses, there have been only a few sleeping-rooms, and not always these. Such a hall god and his family members, retainers, servants, and site visitors were all accommodated, and all sorts of general public and family matters had been continued. Later spaces even more resigned were added, but throughout the feudal duration the hallway remained the common center of activity. Westminster Hall in London had been originally an integral part of the royal palace, where all of the common life of the royal court was conducted and king dispensed justice. This excellent room continued to be the main chair of justice in The united kingdomt till 1820.
    • Hence — in the uk: A manor-house; the proprietor's residence on a sizable secured estate: and to some degree an American usage, particularly in the Southern.
    • the general public or common room of a manor-house, offering as a broad meeting-and reception-room, as well as in which justices' process of law had been formerly held. A mercantile building or space the sale of specific articles or goods on account of their particular owners or manufacturers; a spot of purchase or of company for a trade or gild: as, a hardware hallway; Goldsmiths' Hall or Stationers' Hall in London.
    • An edifice which process of law of justice are held or legal archives are preserved: since, Westminster Hall; the Hall of registers in New York.
    • a space or building specialized in general public business or entertainment, or even to conferences of public or business systems: because, a town hall; an association hall; a music-hall.
    • the key building of a college, plus some circumstances, as at Oxford and Cambridge in England, the specific name of a college. How many universities called halls (a term which, and household, had been initially put on the residence of college scholars) in these universities, as soon as substantial, is now tiny and decreasing.
    • In English colleges: The large room in which the students dine in common. Hence— The students' dinner.
    • In US colleges: a-room or building appropriated towards the group meetings of a literary or any other community; in addition, the culture it self.
    • among structures by which students sleep; a dormitory.
    • An entranceway or passageway in a property ultimately causing or communicating with its different components.
    • US kid psychologist whose ideas of youngster psychology highly affected educational psychology (1844-1924)
    • a large building utilized by a college or college for training or research
    • the big room of a manor or palace
    • United States explorer just who led three expeditions into Arctic (1821-1871)
    • a big building for conferences or activity
    • an interior passage or corridor onto which spaces available
    • a big entry or reception space or area
    • a college or college building containing lifestyle quarters for pupils
    • usa chemist who developed an economical approach to creating aluminum from bauxite (1863-1914)
    • a large and imposing household
    • a large area for gatherings or entertainment
    • US astronomer whom discovered Phobos and Deimos (the two satellites of Mars) (1829-1907)

Related Sources

  • Definition for "hall"
    • A corridor or passageway in a building.
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    • un-cool or dull, opposite of kitchen…
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