h definition

  • noun:
    • The eighth letter of the modern-day English alphabet.
    • some of the message seems represented because of the page h.
    • The eighth in a set.
    • anything shaped just like the letter H.
    • The 8th page associated with the basic contemporary Latin alphabet.
    • voiceless glottal fricative.
    • Planck's continual
    • The 8th page regarding the English alphabet, known as aitch and written in the Latin script.
    • The ordinal quantity 8th, derived from this letter associated with the English alphabet, called aitch and written in the Latin script.
    • An abbreviation of home of Commons.
    • An abbreviation of His Holiness —that is, the Pope—or of their (or Her) Highness.
    • An abbreviation in epitaphs associated with Latin term hic jacet (which see).
    • An abbreviation of House of Lords.
    • An abbreviation of Heralds' College.
    • An abbreviation of His Eminence;
    • of Bis (or Her) Excellency;
    • of Hydraulic Engineer.
    • An abbreviation of Latin hic est, ‘he is’; of the Latin hoc est, ‘this is.’
    • An abbreviation
    • of their Grace;
    • of Horse Guards.
    • An abbreviation of Hawaiian isles.
    • An abbreviation
    • of Hallelujah Meter;
    • of Home Mission or Home Missionary.
    • An abbreviation of half pay;
    • of High Priest;
    • of high-pressure, whenever applied to cyliuders: when put on machines it means horse-power, and, to avoid confusion, whenever a high-pressure motor is intended what must certanly be written completely.
    • An abbreviation of headquarters.
    • An abbreviation of Home Ruler.
    • In electricity, an abbreviation of high weight.
    • an acronym of hoc titulo, ‘in (or under) this name.’
    • the 8th letter of this Roman alphabet
    • (thermodynamics) a thermodynamic amount corresponding to the inner power of a method plus the item of its volume and force
    • the continual of proportionality relating the energy of a photon to its regularity; more or less 6.626 x 10^-34 joule-second
    • a nonmetallic univalent factor which are a colorless and odorless highly combustible diatomic fuel; the easiest and lightest and most plentiful aspect in the universe
    • a unit of inductance for which an induced electromotive power of just one volt is created if the present is diverse on price of 1 ampere per 2nd
  • others:
    • The symbol for Planck's constant.
    • the eighth letter regarding the English alphabet, is classed one of the consonants, and is created with the mouth organs in identical position as that of the succeeding vowel. It's combined with particular consonants to make digraphs representing noises that aren't based in the alphabet, as sh, th, �, as in shall, thing, �ine (for zh see §274); also, to change the sounds of another letters, as when put after c and p, with the former which it presents a compound appear to be compared to tsh, like in appeal (written in addition tch like in catch), utilizing the latter, the noise of f, as in period, phantom. In some words, mainly derived or introduced from foreign languages, h after c and g indicates that those consonants have the hard noise before e, i, and y, as with chemistry, chiromancy, chyle, Ghent, Ghibelline, etc.; in some other people, ch has the sound of sh, as with chicane. See Help Guide To Pronunciation, §§ 153, 179, 181-3, 237-8.
    • The seventh level in diatonic scale, being used by the Germans for B organic. See b.
    • The eighth page and 6th consonant within the English alphabet.
    • The noise belonging to the character in Phenician had been that of a rough guttural spirant, nearly such as the ch in German, or perhaps in Scotch loch (marked in this dictionary ċh). Inside Greek alphabet it had initially the kindred but weaker value of our h; with this price it passed to Italy, and thus continued there; in Greece it came later on to be used as a lengthy ē (right down to that time long and short age had been written alike E), the h-sound being indicated by a half H, specifically ├, afterwards paid down to └ and ‘, which last after that retained the h-value, or that of the “rough respiration,” so called, today frequently printed’. Our h-sound is known as the “aspiration,” to be a near approach to pure unmodified breathing, an audible emission of air before a vowel or semivowel, made, in every instance, in identical position of mouth-organs as that needed because of the following sound. This is certainly, the h of ha is manufactured when you look at the mouth-position of a, the utterance in combination changing just from unintonated to intonated breath; compared to he's manufactured in the mouth-position of ee;.and so with ho, and so forth. Thus, the h prior to each various vowel presents another type of item, and h indicates a kind of common surd to all the vowels as sonants; and, becoming dependent always for its unique personality upon here sound, it is extremely suitably published by the Greeks with a subordinate indication prefixed to your vowel. In English the aspiration takes place before all of the vowels, as well as before the semivowels w and y, as with whit (that is, hwit) and hue (that is, hyu), though in these instances some authorities hold the w- and y-sounds on their own aren't uttered, but only the h-sound, this becoming just what it could be if semivowel were actually pronounced. This view may simply rely upon a real difference of pronunciation, but is more probably one of apprehension and analysis; undoubtedly, in our ordinary utterance, whit is hoo-it properly as wit will be oo-it. In older English our h-sound had been pronounced also before r and l, as with AS. hring, English ring, AS. hrīm, English rime, AS. hrōf, English roof, AS. hlāf, English loaf, AS. hlid, English top, AS. hliehhan, English laugh, etc.; various other languages its discovered additionally before m and n. The English h inside Teutonic area of the language comes from a genuine surd guttural, a k, which initially became a guttural spirant (= ch in German, or in Scotch loch), and ended up being more weakened to only aspiration. The spirant becomes mere aspiration whenever its production stops to-be accompanied with a constriction towards the top of the neck, causing a rough fricative noise, so providing a specific character toward utterance. A guttural mute had been changed to a spirant also when you look at the inside of numerous of your terms, and was previously written with h: thus, AS. niht, English evening; however it is certainly lost in pronunciation, after becoming written with gh in the place of h (the g never pronounced). The aspiration, certainly, being the weakest and least positive of alphabetic sounds, is especially prone to come to be silent. The Latin initial h had been totally silent in the vernacular forms which surfaced as Old French and Italian, and in the earliest Old French, as however in Italian, it will not appear in composing. The first Old French terms, for that reason, having initial Latin h, were transported into Middle English without h, as abit, ready, eir, onest, onor, onur, oure, ure, etc., through comparable Old French forms from Latin habitus, habilis, heres, honestus, honor, hora, etc. In later on Old French and Middle English the pedantic habit of imitating the spelling regarding the initial Latin, if known, generated the general renovation of h in these words, a restoration completed in modern-day French, although the h has actually remained constantly unpronounced in French, and, in the oldest and a lot of familiar words, in English. The h now appears when you look at the contemporary kinds of all the preceding words, as well as others (except able and arbor, the restored kinds hable, harbor, having not survived), namely, unpronounced in heir, truthful, honor, time, etc., and pronounced (by conformity to later terms) in habit, heretic, etc., during some, as natural herb, simple, etc., the pronunciation wavers between the earlier in the day unaspirated type while the later aspirated form. The confusion present in such cases resulted in some difference when you look at the spelling of words originally and precisely you start with a vowel, the h, though not pronounced, becoming often mistakenly placed on paper, as with habandon, habound, habundance, etc., for abandon, are plentiful, variety, etc. A similar confusion extended to words of Anglo-Saxon or any other Teutonic source, the h becoming dropped often in which it must appear, and, more frequently, placed in which it will not appear, as hape for ape, their concerning is, etc. This confusion characterizes the present pronunciation for the London cockney. The habitual omission of h is, however, quite common in educated message in some positions, plus where frequently uttered it really is more likely to be lost after a final consonant in quick and easy conversing. Inside pronouns he, him, the lady, when unaccented, because they usually are after another term, the h is virtually universally omitted in colloquial speech, an omission very long recognized when you look at the typical spelling of the relevant neuter pronoun struck, today constantly written and pronounced it, as well as in the colloquial plural hem, now written 'em. The h forms several digraphs, or compound characters, some of them of great significance and regularity. The origin for this practice extends back on earliest Greek period, once the so-called aspirates had been genuine aspirates— which, mutes with an audible little bit of flatus expelled after them: kh almost as with backhouse, th as with boat-hook, ph as with haphazard. The noises were in the beginning therefore written in Greek, with an h after each and every mute; later, quick figures had been devised to replace these combinations. However in Greek words carried into Italy the spelling with h was kept up: hence, chorus, theatrum, philosophus; after that, into the modification among these aspirates to spirants, unitary values had been obtained by the digraphs; together with using th, especially with spirant worth (slim, that), ended up being widely extended into Teutonic section of our language. The digraph sh comes by alteration for the k of sk to a spirant, and its particular fusion with all the sibilant, making an even more palatal sibilant. The origin of our gh (always either quiet or pronounced as f), by graphic differ from earlier in the day h, has-been claimed above. (See additionally under G.) eventually, rh is found in Greek terms, as rhetoric, and signifies an r with preceding aspiration, such as AS. hring (whence it must properly be written hour, as hw for wh); although aspiration is always lost within our utterance. When it comes to name of this letter, see aitch.
    • As a medieval numeral, 200. along with a dash over it, hence, , 200,000.
    • As a symbol:
    • As an abbreviation: , , ,
    • An abbreviation of His (or the woman) Majesty.
    • An abbreviation of horse-power.
    • An abbreviation of House of Representatives.
    • In mineralogy, the original page regarding the general icon, hkl, put on a face of a crystal into the system of Miller. See symbol.
    • In electrical energy, the symbolization for henry (which see).
    • In pathol., hypermetropia.
  • abbreviation:
    • level
    • time
  • initialism:
    • abbreviation for hour (specially when utilized as a (non-SI) product of time alongside Global System of devices (SI) products)
    • the statistic stating how many hits by a new player
    • heroin
    • hexadecimal (following lots)

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