grace definition

  • noun:
    • apparently effortless beauty or allure of movement, form, or proportion.
    • A characteristic or high quality pleasing for its allure or sophistication.
    • A sense of physical fitness or propriety.
    • a disposition becoming ample or helpful; goodwill.
    • Mercy; clemency.
    • A favor rendered by person who need not achieve this; indulgence.
    • a short-term resistance or exemption; a reprieve.
    • Greek & Roman Mythology Three cousin goddesses, known in Greek mythology as Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia, whom dispense allure and beauty.
    • Divine love and security bestowed freely on individuals.
    • The state to be safeguarded or sanctified because of the benefit of Jesus.
    • An excellence or power given by God.
    • a quick prayer of true blessing or thanksgiving stated before or after dinner.
    • combined with their, Her, or Your as a title and as a type of target for a duke, duchess, or archbishop.
    • songs An appoggiatura, trill, or any other musical ornanment in music of sixteenth and 17th century England.
    • Elegant activity; poise or balance.
    • Free and undeserved favour, specially of Jesus. Unmerited divine help directed at humans with their regeneration or sanctification.
    • Divine help in resisting sin.
    • Short prayer of thanks before or after dinner.
    • An allowance period issued for a debtor when he's without any about part of their regular responsibilities to the creditor.
    • The workout of love, kindness, mercy, favor; personality to profit or serve another; favor bestowed or privilege conferred.
    • The divine benefit toward man; the mercy of God, as distinguished from their justice; in addition, any advantages His mercy imparts; divine love or pardon; circumstances of acceptance with God; enjoyment associated with divine benefit.
    • The prerogative of mercy execised by the professional, as pardon.
    • equivalent prerogative when exercised by means of equitable relief through chancery.
    • Fortune; fortune; -- made use of commonly with tough or sorry with regards to means misfortune.
    • Inherent excellence; any endowment or characteristic suited to win favor or confer satisfaction or advantage.
    • Beauty, physical, intellectual, or ethical; loveliness; commonly, effortless beauty of ways; brilliance of form.
    • Graceful and gorgeous females, cousin goddesses, represented by ancient writers whilst the attendants occasionally of Apollo but oftener of Venus. They were frequently discussed as three in quantity; namely, Aglaia, Euphrosyne, and Thalia, and had been considered the inspirers associated with the characteristics which give attractiveness to knowledge, love, and personal intercourse.
    • The subject of a duke, a duchess, or an archbishop, and formerly associated with master of England.
    • Many thanks.
    • A petition for sophistication; a blessing requested, or thanks a lot rendered, before or after dinner.
    • Ornamental notes or short passages, either introduced by the performer, or indicated because of the composer, whereby the notation indications are known as sophistication records, appeggiaturas, turns, etc.
    • An act, vote, or decree of the government of this establishment; a qualification or privilege conferred by such vote or decree.
    • A play made to market or show elegance of movement. It is made up in throwing a little hoop from a single player to another, by means of two sticks in the hands of each. Known as in addition elegance hoop or hoops.
    • That element or top-notch kind, manner, movement, carriage, deportment, language, etc., which renders it pleasing or pleasant; style or beauty of kind, overview, way, movement, or work; pleasing balance or appropriateness; that quality in something or an act which charms or delights: as, to maneuver with simple sophistication.
    • plural [capitalized] In traditional mythology, the goddesses for the beauty, brightness, and pleasure in the wild and humanity. The Graces are the Charites for the Greeks, variously referred to as daughters of Helios (the Sun) and Aigle (heavenly brightness), or of Zeus (Jupiter) and Eurynome (daughter of Ocean —the Aurora). They certainly were in addition variously named, however their most familiar brands tend to be Aglaϊa(the brilliant), Euphrosyne(cheerfulness), and Thalia (the bloom of life). They'd within their gift sophistication, loveliness, and favor, and had been attendants in train of Aphrodite.
    • Amenity of disposition or way; sweetness or amiability; graciousness; politeness; courtesy; civility: since, to produce with great grace.
    • plural some sort of play or game designed to exhibit or develop effortless gracefulness in movement. One player, by means of two sticks held one out of each hand. throws a tiny hoop to some other, who endeavors to get it on two comparable sticks, and to throw it back in exactly the same way.
    • an enjoyable and appealing quality or endowment; beauty; adornment; decoration.
    • In music, an embellishment, whether vocal or instrumental, perhaps not important to the harmony or melody of a piece, such as for instance an appoggiatura, a trill, a turn, etc. Such embellishments were so much more typical in music when it comes to harpsichord as well as the viol than these are generally for contemporary instruments; their particular precise form and also the place of their introduction were usually kept in the eighteenth century toward style associated with performer.
    • benefit; good will; friendship; favorable disposition to another; positive regard: because, to stay in one′ s good graces; to reign because of the grace of Jesus.
    • An act of kindness or favor accorded to or bestowed on another; an excellent turn or service freely rendered.
    • A faculty, license, or dispensation bestowed by legal authority, the approving which rests in discretion or benefit, and it is never to be asked as of right; a privilege; additionally, in English law, an over-all and no-cost pardon by work of Parliament. Also referred to as act of sophistication.
    • In Scrip, and theology: The no-cost, unmerited love and favor of Jesus: because, the doctrine of sophistication (this is certainly, the doctrine that all things, including salvation, are obtained from God as a totally free present, rather than merited or attained by guy).
    • The pleasure associated with favor of Jesus.
    • advantage, especially inward spiritual gift suggestions, conferred by God through Christ Jesus; particularly, energy or personality to yield obedience to the divine laws and regulations, to practise the Christian virtues, and keep trouble or ailment with perseverance and resignation: as, grace to execute a duty, or to keep up under an affliction.
    • Virtue; power; effectiveness.
    • Share of benefit allotted to 1; great deal; lot of money; chance.
    • Mercy; pardon.
    • Indulgence; forbearance; allowance of the time: since, three days′ sophistication for the repayment of a note.
    • In English universities, an act, vote, or decree regarding the federal government associated with the organization: as, a grace ended up being authorized by the Senate at Cambridge for founding a Chinese professorship.
    • Thanks a lot; thanksgiving.
    • A formula of words revealing thanks and wanting a blessing on or with meals or refreshment; a short prayer before or after meals, by which a blessing is asked or thanks a lot tend to be rendered: as, to state grace; elegance before meat.
    • A title of honor formerly borne by the sovereigns of England, however now made use of just as a ceremonious subject in talking with or of a duke, a duchess, or an archbishop: as, his Grace the Duke of Wellington.
    • The period.beyond the fixed day for payment allowed by law or custom for paying a note or bill of exchange. In Great Britain and the united States, at common law, three days are allowed; but if the last day of grace falls on Sunday, or any day on which business is not legally carried on, the bill or note is payable on the day preceding. Modern statutes have made some changes in these rules, particularly as regards legal holidays immediately preceding or following Sunday. Bankers′ checks are payable on demand without days of grace, and the same rule applies to bills or notes payable on demand.
    • A bow or courtesy.
    • a sense of propriety and consideration for other individuals
    • a disposition to kindness and compassion
    • (Greek mythology) certainly one of three siblings who have been the givers of beauty and appeal; a well liked topic for sculptors
    • (Christian theology) a state of sanctification by God; their state of one that is under such divine impact
    • style and beauty of action or phrase
    • a brief prayer of thanks before dinner
    • (Christian theology) the no-cost and unmerited favor or beneficence of Jesus
  • verb-transitive:
    • To honor or prefer: You grace our table along with your presence.
    • to offer beauty, beauty, or appeal to.
    • Music To embellish with elegance notes.
    • To adorn; to decorate; to embellish and dignify.
    • To dignify or boost by an act of benefit; to honor.
    • to provide with heavenly elegance.
    • To add sophistication records, cadenzas, etc., to.
  • idiom:
    • when you look at the bad graces of from benefit with.
    • into the good graces of In benefit with.
    • with bad elegance In a grudging way.
    • with good elegance In a willing manner.
  • verb:
    • To adorn; to enhance; to embellish and dignify.
    • To dignify or raise by an act of favour; to honour.
    • to produce with heavenly grace.
    • to include elegance records, cadenzas, etc., to.
    • make more desirable by adding decoration, colour, etc.
    • be breathtaking to check out
  • others:
    • To adorn; decorate; embellish and dignify; provide or include elegance to.
    • To confer grace or favor upon; afford satisfaction or satisfaction to.
    • To dignify or gratify by an act of benefit; favor or honor (with one thing).
    • to provide with heavenly elegance.
    • In music, to add grace-notes, cadenzas, etc., to: because, to grace a melody.

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