• Definition for "gold"
    • A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant element, probably the most…
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  • Cross Reference for "gold"
  • Urban Dictionary for "gold"
    • 1. A manifestation for descriping a…
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gold definition

  • noun:
    • A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant element, probably the most malleable and ductile material, happening in veins and alluvial build up and restored by mining or by panning or sluicing. An excellent thermal and electric conductor, gold is generally alloyed to boost its strength, which is utilized as an international monetary standard, in jewelry, for decoration, so that as a plated layer on numerous electric and technical components. Atomic number 79; atomic body weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling-point 2,966.0°C; specific-gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See dining table at factor.
    • A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant element, many malleable and ductile metal, occurring in veins and alluvial deposits and recovered by mining or by panning or sluicing. An excellent thermal and electrical conductor, gold is normally alloyed to boost its strength, which is used as a global monetary standard, in jewellery, for decoration, and also as a plated layer on a wide variety of electrical and technical components. Atomic number 79; atomic weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See Table at element.
    • Coinage made from this factor.
    • A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant factor, many malleable and ductile metal, occurring in veins and alluvial build up and recovered by mining or by panning or sluicing. A great thermal and electrical conductor, gold is generally alloyed to increase its strength, and it is made use of as an international monetary standard, in precious jewelry, for decoration, and as a plated layer on a multitude of electrical and mechanical elements. Atomic quantity 79; atomic body weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling-point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See Table at element.
    • Coinage made from this element.
    • A gold standard.
    • A gold standard.
    • Coinage made of this element.
    • cash; riches.
    • A gold standard.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, strong to vivid yellow.
    • cash; riches.
    • anything considered having great price or goodness: a heart of gold.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellowish, or a moderate, powerful to vivid yellow.
    • A medal manufactured from gold granted to one inserting first-in a competition, such as the Olympics: claimed 9 golds in 13 occasions.
    • One thing considered to be having great value or goodness: a heart of gold.
    • A gold record.
    • A soft, yellowish, corrosion-resistant element, more malleable and ductile steel, happening in veins and alluvial deposits and restored by mining or by panning or sluicing. A beneficial thermal and electrical conductor, gold is usually alloyed to increase its strength, and it is made use of as a worldwide monetary standard, in jewelry, for decoration, and as a plated coating on a wide variety of electric and mechanical components. Atomic number 79; atomic body weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See dining table at element.
    • A medal made of silver granted to a single inserting first-in a competition, such as the Olympics: obtained 9 golds in 13 activities.
    • Money; riches.
    • Coinage manufactured from this factor.
    • A gold record.
    • A gold standard.
    • cash; riches.
    • huge yellow elemental metal of great worth, with atomic quantity 79 and symbolization Au.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, strong to vivid yellow.
    • A coin made from this product, or supposedly therefore.
    • A bright yellow colour, resembling the material silver.
    • anything thought to be having great worth or goodness: a heart of gold.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellowish, or a moderate, powerful to brilliant yellow.
    • A medal made of gold awarded to one placing first in a competition, as in the Olympics: obtained 9 golds in 13 activities.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • Something considered to be having great price or goodness: a heart of silver.
    • A gold medal.
    • A gold record.
    • much yellow elemental metal of good value, with atomic number 79 and logo Au.
    • Anything or anybody regarded as being really important.
    • A coin made from this product, or supposedly therefore.
    • huge yellow elemental steel of good value, with atomic quantity 79 and representation Au.
    • A bright yellowish colour, resembling the material gold.
    • A coin manufactured from this material, or supposedly therefore.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • A bright yellowish colour, resembling the steel silver.
    • A gold medal.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • Everything or any person regarded as extremely valuable.
    • A gold medal.
    • Everything or any person considered to be very important.
    • A medal manufactured from gold awarded to at least one placing first-in a competition, like in the Olympics: obtained 9 golds in 13 events.
    • A gold record.
    • much yellow elemental material of great value, with atomic number 79 and icon Au.
    • a classic English title of some yellowish flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), based on Dr. Prior, in Chaucer possibly the turnsole.
    • A metallic section of atomic quantity 79, constituting more rare metal used as a typical commercial method of change. It has a characteristic yellow shade, is just one of the heaviest substances understood (specific gravity 19.32), is smooth, and extremely malleable and ductile. It's quite unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), dampness, and most corrosive agents, and therefore perfect for its use in money and jewellery. Expression Au (Aurum). Atomic weight 196.97.
    • cash; riches; wide range.
    • a vintage English name of some yellowish flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), relating to Dr. Prior, however in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.
    • A metallic component of atomic number 79, constituting the most rare metal made use of as a common commercial medium of trade. This has a characteristic yellowish shade, is among the heaviest substances understood (specific-gravity 19.32), is soft, and incredibly malleable and ductile. It is rather unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), moisture, and a lot of corrosive representatives, and so well suited for its use within coin and precious jewelry. Sign Au (Aurum). Atomic body weight 196.97.
    • cash; riches; wealth.
    • A yellow color, that way associated with steel.
    • Figuratively, some thing precious or pure.
    • a vintage English name of some yellowish rose, -- the marigold (Calendula), based on Dr. Prior, in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.
    • Chemical logo, Au; atomic body weight, 196.7. A precious steel remarkable on account of its unique and gorgeous yellowish color, luster, high specific gravity, and freedom from responsibility to rust or tarnish whenever exposed to air.
    • A coin made of this material, or supposedly so.
    • A yellow shade, that way for the material.
    • For this reason, figuratively Money; riches; wealth.
    • A bright yellowish colour, resembling the material gold.
    • Figuratively, something precious or pure.
    • something extremely important or highly prized; something considered to be extremely valuable, or by pure or sterling quality.
    • Chemical icon, Au; atomic body weight, 196.7. A precious material remarkable due to its special and gorgeous yellowish shade, luster, high specific gravity, and freedom from obligation to rust or tarnish when subjected to the air.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • A bright-yellow color, like this associated with the metal gold; also, gilding: because, a flower edged with gold.
    • ergo, figuratively cash; riches; wide range.
    • A metallic part of atomic quantity 79, constituting many platinum made use of as a typical commercial method of trade. This has a characteristic yellowish color, is among the heaviest substances known (specific gravity 19.32), is smooth, and very malleable and ductile. It is very unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), moisture, & most corrosive agents, and therefore suitable for its used in coin and jewellery. Sign Au (Aurum). Atomic fat 196.97.
    • In archery, the exact center associated with the target, so-called because marked with silver, or of a gold shade; hence, a go that hits the middle: as, to secure a gold.
    • any such thing very valuable or very prized; such a thing considered to be really precious, or since pure or sterling quality.
    • A gold medal.
    • Money; riches; wealth.
    • A bright-yellow color, that way of the metal gold; in addition, gilding: because, a flower edged with silver.
    • [English dial. additionally goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, merely a specific using silver, the metal. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • Everything or anyone regarded as really valuable.
    • A yellow shade, that way of the metal.
    • In archery, the precise center for the target, so-called because marked with gold, or of a gold color; ergo, a shot that strikes the middle: since, to secure a gold.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • Figuratively, some thing precious or pure.
    • [English switch. in addition goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, merely a certain utilization of gold, the metal. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • Chemical image, Au; atomic fat, 196.7. A precious metal remarkable on account of its special and gorgeous yellowish color, luster, high specific gravity, and freedom from liability to rust or tarnish whenever subjected to the atmosphere.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • ergo, figuratively Money; riches; wealth.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum associated with ancients.
    • any such thing really valuable or extremely prized; something regarded as extremely valuable, or by pure or sterling quality.
    • A bright-yellow shade, like this of material silver; additionally, gilding: since, a flower edged with gold.
    • In archery, the exact center of this target, so called because marked with silver, or of a gold shade; hence, a go that hits the guts: because, to secure a gold.
    • [English dial. also goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, just a specific using silver, the material. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • a soft yellow malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic factor; does occur mainly as nuggets in stones and alluvial build up; will not respond with most chemical substances it is attacked by chlorine and aqua regia
    • a vintage English name of some yellowish rose, -- the marigold (Calendula), based on Dr. Prior, but in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.
    • A metallic part of atomic quantity 79, constituting more precious metal used as a standard commercial method of trade. It offers a characteristic yellowish shade, is just one of the heaviest substances understood (specific gravity 19.32), is smooth, and very malleable and ductile. It Really Is quite unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), moisture, & most corrosive representatives, therefore perfect for its used in coin and jewellery. Sign Au (Aurum). Atomic body weight 196.97.
    • a-deep yellow color
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • Money; riches; wide range.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum for the ancients.
    • great wealth
    • coins made of silver
    • one thing likened towards steel in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • a soft yellow malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic factor; takes place mainly as nuggets in stones and alluvial deposits; will not react with many chemical compounds it is assaulted by chlorine and aqua regia
    • a deep yellow color
    • A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant factor, the absolute most malleable and ductile material, occurring in veins and alluvial deposits and recovered by mining or by panning or sluicing. A great thermal and electric conductor, gold is typically alloyed to improve its energy, which is utilized as a worldwide financial standard, in jewellery, for decoration, so when a plated layer on a wide variety of electric and mechanical components. Atomic number 79; atomic fat 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling point 2,966.0°C; specific-gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See Table at factor.
    • A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant element, probably the most malleable and ductile metal, happening in veins and alluvial build up and restored by mining or by panning or sluicing. A beneficial thermal and electric conductor, silver is generally alloyed to improve its power, and it's also utilized as a global monetary standard, in jewellery, for design, and as a plated finish on numerous electrical and mechanical components. Atomic number 79; atomic weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See Table at factor.
    • Coinage made of this element.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum associated with the ancients.
    • Coinage made of this factor.
    • A gold standard.
    • A gold standard.
    • Money; riches.
    • cash; riches.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellowish, or a moderate, strong to vivid yellow.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, strong to vivid yellow.
    • anything viewed as having great value or goodness: a heart of silver.
    • Something viewed as having great price or goodness: a heart of gold.
    • a soft yellowish malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic factor; takes place mainly as nuggets in stones and alluvial deposits; will not respond with most chemical substances but is assaulted by chlorine and aqua regia
    • A medal made of silver granted to at least one placing first in a competition, as in the Olympics: claimed 9 golds in 13 activities.
    • A medal made of silver awarded to a single inserting first in a competition, like in the Olympics: claimed 9 golds in 13 activities.
    • A yellow color, like this of steel.
    • a-deep yellowish color
    • great wealth
    • A gold record.
    • A gold record.
    • Figuratively, some thing valuable or pure.
    • coins made from gold
    • huge yellow elemental steel of great price, with atomic number 79 and icon Au.
    • Chemical expression, Au; atomic body weight, 196.7. A precious material remarkable because of its unique and breathtaking yellowish shade, luster, large specific gravity, and freedom from obligation to rust or tarnish when subjected to the atmosphere.
    • anything likened into the steel in brightness or preciousness or superiority an such like.
    • great wealth
    • therefore, figuratively cash; riches; wide range.
    • A coin manufactured from this product, or supposedly therefore.
    • coins made of gold
    • much yellow elemental steel of good price, with atomic number 79 and representation Au.
    • A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant factor, more malleable and ductile metal, happening in veins and alluvial build up and restored by mining or by panning or sluicing. A beneficial thermal and electrical conductor, silver is generally alloyed to increase its energy, and it's also made use of as a worldwide financial standard, in jewelry, for design, so that as a plated layer on numerous electrical and technical elements. Atomic quantity 79; atomic body weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling point 2,966.0°C; specific-gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See Table at element.
    • A soft, yellowish, corrosion-resistant factor, probably the most malleable and ductile material, occurring in veins and alluvial build up and restored by mining or by panning or sluicing. An excellent thermal and electric conductor, gold is usually alloyed to boost its power, and it's also utilized as a worldwide monetary standard, in jewelry, for design, so when a plated finish on a multitude of electrical and technical components. Atomic number 79; atomic body weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling-point 2,966.0°C; specific-gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See dining table at element.
    • something really important or very prized; such a thing regarded as extremely precious, or as of pure or sterling high quality.
    • A bright yellowish colour, resembling the steel gold.
    • A coin manufactured from this product, or supposedly so.
    • anything likened towards material in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • Coinage made from this factor.
    • A bright-yellow color, like this of material silver; additionally, gilding: as, a flower edged with silver.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • A bright yellowish color, resembling the steel gold.
    • A gold standard.
    • In archery, the exact center of the target, so-called because marked with gold, or of a gold color; thus, a go that hits the middle: because, to secure a gold.
    • A gold medal.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • [English switch. in addition goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, simply a particular using gold, the steel. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • A gold medal.
    • Money; riches.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, powerful to brilliant yellow.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • Everything or any person regarded as really important.
    • Something viewed as having great value or goodness: a heart of silver.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • A medal manufactured from silver awarded to at least one inserting first in a competition, as with the Olympics: obtained 9 golds in 13 occasions.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum of ancients.
    • A gold record.
    • huge yellow elemental steel of great value, with atomic number 79 and image Au.
    • a soft yellowish malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic element; occurs mainly as nuggets in rocks and alluvial build up; doesn't react with many chemical substances it is attacked by chlorine and aqua regia
    • A coin manufactured from this material, or supposedly so.
    • A bright yellowish colour, resembling the steel gold.
    • a-deep yellowish shade
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • great wealth
    • A gold medal.
    • A soft, yellow, corrosion-resistant factor, probably the most malleable and ductile metal, happening in veins and alluvial deposits and recovered by mining or by panning or sluicing. A beneficial thermal and electric conductor, silver is normally alloyed to boost its strength, and it's also made use of as a worldwide financial standard, in jewellery, for design, and as a plated layer on a multitude of electric and mechanical elements. Atomic quantity 79; atomic weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See Table at factor.
    • coins made from silver
    • any such thing or anybody regarded as being extremely important.
    • Coinage made from this element.
    • A gold standard.
    • Money; riches.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, powerful to brilliant yellow.
    • some thing considered to be having great value or goodness: a heart of gold.
    • Coinage made of this factor.
    • something or anyone regarded as very valuable.
    • one thing likened toward steel in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • A soft, yellowish, corrosion-resistant element, more malleable and ductile steel, happening in veins and alluvial build up and recovered by mining or by panning or sluicing. Good thermal and electric conductor, silver is typically alloyed to improve its power, and it is utilized as a worldwide financial standard, in jewellery, for design, so that as a plated coating on a wide variety of electric and mechanical elements. Atomic quantity 79; atomic fat 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling-point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See Table at factor.
    • A soft, yellowish, corrosion-resistant factor, more malleable and ductile material, happening in veins and alluvial build up and restored by mining or by panning or sluicing. A great thermal and electrical conductor, silver is usually alloyed to boost its power, and it is made use of as a global monetary standard, in jewelry, for decoration, so that as a plated finish on a multitude of electrical and mechanical elements. Atomic quantity 79; atomic weight 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling-point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See dining table at factor.
    • A medal manufactured from gold awarded to at least one placing first-in a competition, as in the Olympics: won 9 golds in 13 occasions.
    • A soft, yellowish, corrosion-resistant factor, the most malleable and ductile material, happening in veins and alluvial build up and restored by mining or by panning or sluicing. A thermal and electric conductor, silver is usually alloyed to boost its power, which is utilized as a worldwide monetary standard, in jewelry, for design, so that as a plated coating on a wide variety of electrical and mechanical elements. Atomic number 79; atomic fat 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling-point 2,966.0°C; specific gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See dining table at factor.
    • Coinage made from this element.
    • Coinage made of this factor.
    • A gold record.
    • Coinage made of this factor.
    • A gold standard.
    • A gold standard.
    • A gold standard.
    • A gold standard.
    • cash; riches.
    • A soft, yellowish, corrosion-resistant factor, the essential malleable and ductile steel, happening in veins and alluvial deposits and recovered by mining or by panning or sluicing. A thermal and electric conductor, gold is usually alloyed to improve its power, which is utilized as an international monetary standard, in precious jewelry, for design, so when a plated layer on a multitude of electrical and technical elements. Atomic number 79; atomic fat 196.967; melting point 1,063.0°C; boiling-point 2,966.0°C; specific-gravity 19.32; valence 1, 3. See dining table at element.
    • Money; riches.
    • cash; riches.
    • An old English name of some yellow flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), according to Dr. Prior, but in Chaucer possibly the turnsole.
    • An old English name of some yellow flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), relating to Dr. Prior, however in Chaucer possibly the turnsole.
    • cash; riches.
    • much yellow elemental metal of good value, with atomic quantity 79 and symbol Au.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, powerful to brilliant yellow.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellowish, or a moderate, strong to vivid yellow.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, powerful to brilliant yellow.
    • Coinage manufactured from this element.
    • A metallic section of atomic number 79, constituting many rare metal made use of as a typical commercial method of change. It's a characteristic yellowish shade, is just one of the heaviest substances understood (specific-gravity 19.32), is soft, and incredibly malleable and ductile. It is rather unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), dampness, and most corrosive agents, and as a consequence perfect for its used in coin and precious jewelry. Image Au (Aurum). Atomic weight 196.97.
    • A metallic section of atomic number 79, constituting more rare metal used as a standard commercial medium of trade. It offers a characteristic yellowish shade, is among the heaviest substances understood (specific gravity 19.32), is soft, and very malleable and ductile. It is very unalterable by heat (melting point 1064.4° C), moisture, and most corrosive agents, and therefore well suited for its use in money and precious jewelry. Symbolization Au (Aurum). Atomic fat 196.97.
    • A coin manufactured from this material, or supposedly so.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, powerful to brilliant yellow.
    • A gold standard.
    • One thing viewed as having great value or goodness: a heart of silver.
    • anything seen as having great worth or goodness: a heart of gold.
    • cash; riches; wide range.
    • cash; riches; wealth.
    • A bright yellowish colour, resembling the material silver.
    • One thing seen as having great value or goodness: a heart of silver.
    • Something viewed as having great value or goodness: a heart of gold.
    • A medal made from silver awarded to at least one inserting first in a competition, such as the Olympics: obtained 9 golds in 13 events.
    • cash; riches.
    • A yellow color, like that associated with steel.
    • A medal manufactured from gold granted to at least one placing first-in a competition, as with the Olympics: obtained 9 golds in 13 activities.
    • A light olive-brown to dark yellow, or a moderate, strong to vivid yellow.
    • A medal made of silver awarded to at least one inserting first-in a competition, as with the Olympics: won 9 golds in 13 events.
    • A medal made from silver awarded to one inserting first-in a competition, as in the Olympics: won 9 golds in 13 activities.
    • Figuratively, something valuable or pure.
    • A gold record.
    • A gold record.
    • A gold record.
    • A gold record.
    • Chemical representation, Au; atomic weight, 196.7. A precious metal remarkable on account of its unique and gorgeous yellow color, luster, large specific-gravity, and freedom from obligation to rust or tarnish whenever subjected to the air.
    • some thing regarded as having great price or goodness: a heart of gold.
    • therefore, figuratively Money; riches; wealth.
    • A medal manufactured from gold awarded to a single inserting first-in a competition, such as the Olympics: won 9 golds in 13 events.
    • much yellow elemental steel of great value, with atomic quantity 79 and sign Au.
    • A yellow shade, like that regarding the steel.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • A coin made from this product, or supposedly therefore.
    • An old English name of some yellow flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), based on Dr. Prior, in Chaucer possibly the turnsole.
    • A heavy yellow elemental metal of great value, with atomic quantity 79 and sign Au.
    • A gold record.
    • Figuratively, one thing precious or pure.
    • something very valuable or extremely prized; something regarded as extremely precious, or as of pure or sterling quality.
    • much yellow elemental steel of great worth, with atomic number 79 and representation Au.
    • A bright yellow color, resembling the metal silver.
    • A gold medal.
    • much yellow elemental material of good worth, with atomic number 79 and logo Au.
    • A coin made of this product, or supposedly therefore.
    • A metallic section of atomic number 79, constituting probably the most platinum used as a standard commercial method of exchange. This has a characteristic yellowish shade, is one of the heaviest substances known (specific gravity 19.32), is smooth, and extremely malleable and ductile. It's quite unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), dampness, and most corrosive representatives, and for that reason suitable for its use in coin and precious jewelry. Symbol Au (Aurum). Atomic weight 196.97.
    • Chemical expression, Au; atomic body weight, 196.7. A precious material remarkable due to its unique and breathtaking yellowish shade, luster, high specific-gravity, and freedom from obligation to rust or tarnish when confronted with the air.
    • A coin made from this material, or supposedly therefore.
    • such a thing or anybody regarded as very important.
    • A coin manufactured from this product, or supposedly therefore.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • A bright-yellow shade, like this associated with the metal gold; in addition, gilding: as, a flower edged with silver.
    • Money; riches; wealth.
    • A bright yellowish color, resembling the material silver.
    • A heavy yellow elemental steel of great worth, with atomic quantity 79 and logo Au.
    • therefore, figuratively Money; riches; wealth.
    • A gold medal.
    • A bright yellowish colour, resembling the material gold.
    • A bright yellow color, resembling the steel gold.
    • A yellow shade, like that of the metal.
    • In archery, the precise center regarding the target, so called because noticeable with silver, or of a gold color; for this reason, a go that strikes the center: as, to secure a gold.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • A coin made from this product, or supposedly so.
    • Anything extremely valuable or extremely prized; everything viewed as very precious, or since pure or sterling high quality.
    • A bright-yellow shade, that way for the steel silver; in addition, gilding: as, a flower edged with silver.
    • [English switch. also goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, simply a certain usage of silver, the steel. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • A gold medal.
    • A bright yellowish colour, resembling the steel silver.
    • Figuratively, some thing precious or pure.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • Everything or anybody considered to be extremely valuable.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • In archery, the actual center of this target, so named because marked with gold, or of a gold shade; hence, a go that strikes the center: because, to secure a gold.
    • A gold medal.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • something or anyone considered to be really important.
    • The bullseye of an archery target.
    • Chemical icon, Au; atomic body weight, 196.7. A precious metal remarkable because of its special and breathtaking yellowish shade, luster, high specific gravity, and freedom from responsibility to rust or tarnish when confronted with the air.
    • A gold medal.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum regarding the ancients.
    • Anything or anybody regarded as being extremely valuable.
    • A gold medal.
    • For this reason, figuratively Money; riches; wealth.
    • [English switch. also goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, just a particular usage of silver, the steel. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • any such thing extremely important or highly prized; anything considered really precious, or at the time of pure or sterling high quality.
    • Everything or anybody regarded as being very valuable.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • Everything or anyone regarded as being very important.
    • A bright-yellow color, like this of the steel gold; also, gilding: as, a flower edged with silver.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • In archery, the exact center regarding the target, so called because marked with gold, or of a gold color; therefore, an attempt that strikes the middle: since, to secure a gold.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum of this ancients.
    • a soft yellowish malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic element; happens primarily as nuggets in stones and alluvial build up; cannot react with many chemicals it is assaulted by chlorine and aqua regia
    • [English dial. additionally goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, just a particular utilization of gold, the metal. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • a-deep yellowish color
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • An old English name of some yellow flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), relating to Dr. Prior, however in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.
    • a classic English name of some yellowish flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), in accordance with Dr. Prior, in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.
    • a classic English title of some yellow rose, -- the marigold (Calendula), relating to Dr. Prior, in Chaucer probably the turnsole.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum associated with the ancients.
    • A metallic element of atomic number 79, constituting probably the most platinum used as a common commercial method of trade. It offers a characteristic yellowish color, is one of the heaviest substances understood (specific gravity 19.32), is smooth, and very malleable and ductile. It Really Is quite unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), dampness, and most corrosive agents, and as a consequence well suited for its use in money and jewelry. Symbol Au (Aurum). Atomic weight 196.97.
    • A metallic section of atomic number 79, constituting the most precious metal used as a standard commercial method of trade. It has a characteristic yellowish color, is among the heaviest substances understood (specific gravity 19.32), is soft, and very malleable and ductile. Its quite unalterable by heat (melting point 1064.4° C), dampness, and most corrosive agents, and as a consequence well suited for its use in coin and jewelry. Sign Au (Aurum). Atomic body weight 196.97.
    • A metallic element of atomic quantity 79, constituting the most precious metal used as a standard commercial medium of exchange. This has a characteristic yellowish shade, is just one of the heaviest substances understood (specific gravity 19.32), is soft, and incredibly malleable and ductile. Its very unalterable by heat (melting point 1064.4° C), dampness, & most corrosive representatives, therefore suitable for its use within money and jewelry. Sign Au (Aurum). Atomic body weight 196.97.
    • Money; riches; wide range.
    • cash; riches; wide range.
    • Money; riches; wide range.
    • a vintage English name of some yellow flower, -- the marigold (Calendula), according to Dr. Prior, but in Chaucer probably the turnsole.
    • An old English title of some yellowish rose, -- the marigold (Calendula), in accordance with Dr. Prior, but in Chaucer probably the turnsole.
    • A yellow shade, that way associated with metal.
    • A yellow color, that way associated with the steel.
    • A yellow shade, like that associated with material.
    • A metallic section of atomic number 79, constituting the most rare metal utilized as a common commercial method of trade. This has a characteristic yellowish shade, is amongst the heaviest substances known (specific-gravity 19.32), is smooth, and extremely malleable and ductile. It Really Is rather unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), moisture, & most corrosive agents, and therefore perfect for its used in money and jewelry. Logo Au (Aurum). Atomic body weight 196.97.
    • Figuratively, something valuable or pure.
    • A metallic element of atomic number 79, constituting many precious metal made use of as a standard commercial method of trade. It has a characteristic yellowish shade, is amongst the heaviest substances understood (specific gravity 19.32), is soft, and extremely malleable and ductile. It is rather unalterable by heat (melting point 1064.4° C), dampness, and a lot of corrosive agents, and so suitable for its use within money and precious jewelry. Logo Au (Aurum). Atomic body weight 196.97.
    • Figuratively, something valuable or pure.
    • cash; riches; wealth.
    • a soft yellow malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic factor; occurs primarily as nuggets in rocks and alluvial deposits; does not respond with most chemicals but is attacked by chlorine and aqua regia
    • Chemical expression, Au; atomic body weight, 196.7. A precious metal remarkable because of its unique and stunning yellowish color, luster, large specific gravity, and freedom from liability to rust or tarnish whenever subjected to the atmosphere.
    • A yellow shade, like this of steel.
    • cash; riches; wide range.
    • Chemical icon, Au; atomic fat, 196.7. A precious metal remarkable because of its special and breathtaking yellow color, luster, high specific-gravity, and freedom from liability to rust or tarnish whenever subjected to the atmosphere.
    • For this reason, figuratively Money; riches; wealth.
    • Figuratively, one thing precious or pure.
    • Figuratively, anything valuable or pure.
    • a deep yellow shade
    • great wealth
    • Chemical icon, Au; atomic weight, 196.7. A precious steel remarkable on account of its unique and breathtaking yellowish color, luster, large specific gravity, and freedom from liability to rust or tarnish when exposed to air.
    • Chemical expression, Au; atomic weight, 196.7. A precious material remarkable on account of its unique and gorgeous yellowish shade, luster, high specific-gravity, and freedom from liability to rust or tarnish whenever subjected to the air.
    • Anything extremely valuable or extremely prized; everything thought to be really valuable, or since pure or sterling quality.
    • coins manufactured from gold
    • A yellow color, like this of metal.
    • a vintage English name of some yellowish rose, -- the marigold (Calendula), according to Dr. Prior, however in Chaucer perhaps the turnsole.
    • For this reason, figuratively cash; riches; wide range.
    • a soft yellow malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic factor; takes place mainly as nuggets in rocks and alluvial deposits; cannot react with most chemical substances but is assaulted by chlorine and aqua regia
    • For this reason, figuratively cash; riches; wide range.
    • great wealth
    • A bright-yellow color, like that for the metal silver; also, gilding: as, a flower edged with silver.
    • one thing likened into steel in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • A metallic part of atomic quantity 79, constituting the absolute most platinum made use of as a standard commercial medium of trade. It has a characteristic yellow color, is among the heaviest substances understood (specific gravity 19.32), is smooth, and very malleable and ductile. It Really Is rather unalterable by temperature (melting point 1064.4° C), moisture, & most corrosive representatives, and therefore suitable for its used in coin and jewellery. Icon Au (Aurum). Atomic fat 196.97.
    • Figuratively, anything precious or pure.
    • For this reason, figuratively cash; riches; wealth.
    • Anything very important or extremely prized; something considered to be extremely valuable, or by pure or sterling quality.
    • something very important or highly prized; everything thought to be really precious, or by pure or sterling high quality.
    • coins manufactured from gold
    • In archery, the exact center regarding the target, so named because marked with silver, or of a gold color; thus, a go that hits the middle: because, to secure a gold.
    • a-deep yellow color
    • A bright-yellow color, like this of metal gold; in addition, gilding: since, a flower edged with silver.
    • A bright-yellow color, that way associated with material silver; also, gilding: as, a flower edged with silver.
    • Chemical image, Au; atomic fat, 196.7. A precious metal remarkable because of its unique and beautiful yellow color, luster, large specific gravity, and freedom from responsibility to rust or tarnish when exposed to the air.
    • cash; riches; wide range.
    • any such thing really valuable or very prized; anything thought to be extremely precious, or since pure or sterling quality.
    • [English dial. additionally goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. gold, goold, guld, merely a specific use of silver, the steel. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • some thing likened toward steel in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • In archery, the exact center for the target, so called because noticeable with gold, or of a gold color; for this reason, a shot that strikes the guts: as, to secure a gold.
    • Hence, figuratively Money; riches; wealth.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • In archery, the actual center regarding the target, so-called because noticeable with silver, or of a gold color; for this reason, a shot that strikes the center: as, to secure a gold.
    • great wide range
    • A bright-yellow color, like that of this steel silver; additionally, gilding: as, a flower edged with gold.
    • A yellow color, like this associated with metal.
    • [English dial. also goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, merely a specific utilization of silver, the material. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • In archery, the exact center of this target, so named because marked with silver, or of a gold shade; for this reason, a shot that strikes the center: since, to secure a gold.
    • Figuratively, one thing valuable or pure.
    • Everything very valuable or extremely prized; everything considered really precious, or at the time of pure or sterling quality.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • [English switch. in addition goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, just a certain usage of gold, the material. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • coins manufactured from gold
    • Chemical sign, Au; atomic weight, 196.7. A precious material remarkable because of its unique and breathtaking yellowish shade, luster, large specific-gravity, and freedom from responsibility to rust or tarnish whenever confronted with air.
    • [English dial. in addition goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. silver, goold, guld, simply a certain using gold, the steel. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum of the ancients.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • A bright-yellow shade, like that regarding the metal gold; in addition, gilding: since, a flower edged with gold.
    • thus, figuratively Money; riches; wide range.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum for the ancients.
    • In archery, the actual center regarding the target, so-called because noticeable with silver, or of a gold color; hence, an attempt that strikes the guts: since, to secure a gold.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • [English switch. additionally goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. gold, goold, guld, just a specific use of gold, the material. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum regarding the ancients.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum of the ancients.
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • a soft yellow malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic element; happens primarily as nuggets in stones and alluvial deposits; will not react with most chemical substances it is attacked by chlorine and aqua regia
    • some thing likened into metal in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • Anything very important or extremely prized; such a thing viewed as really precious, or since pure or sterling quality.
    • A bright-yellow shade, like that associated with metal gold; also, gilding: because, a flower edged with silver.
    • a soft yellow malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic factor; happens primarily as nuggets in rocks and alluvial build up; does not respond with most chemical compounds it is assaulted by chlorine and aqua regia
    • a deep yellowish color
    • a-deep yellow shade
    • a soft yellow malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic factor; happens mainly as nuggets in stones and alluvial deposits; will not respond with most chemical compounds but is assaulted by chlorine and aqua regia
    • a soft yellow malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic element; takes place mainly as nuggets in stones and alluvial build up; will not react with many chemicals it is assaulted by chlorine and aqua regia
    • In archery, the precise center of this target, so called because marked with gold, or of a gold shade; hence, a go that strikes the middle: since, to secure a gold.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum associated with the ancients.
    • a deep yellow shade
    • a-deep yellow color
    • [English dial. additionally goolds (ef. Sc. gool, gule, gules, the corn-marigold), ⟨ ME. gold, goold, guld, simply a specific utilization of gold, the metal. Cf. marigold.] The marigold, Calendula officinalis.
    • great wealth
    • Tho corn-marigold, Chrysanthemum segetum.
    • great wealth
    • coins made from silver
    • coins made from gold
    • great wealth
    • great wide range
    • The turnsol; heliotrope.
    • coins made of silver
    • one thing likened toward metal in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • coins made of gold
    • some thing likened into material in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • A sulphid of tin, the aurum musivum of ancients.
    • anything likened on material in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • anything likened on steel in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • a soft yellowish malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic element; does occur mainly as nuggets in stones and alluvial build up; will not react with most chemical compounds it is attacked by chlorine and aqua regia
    • a-deep yellow shade
    • great wide range
    • coins made of gold
    • one thing likened to the material in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
    • a soft yellowish malleable ductile (trivalent and univalent) metallic factor; does occur mainly as nuggets in stones and alluvial deposits; does not respond with many chemicals but is assaulted by chlorine and aqua regia
    • a-deep yellowish color
    • great wide range
    • coins made from gold
    • some thing likened to your steel in brightness or preciousness or superiority etc.
  • adjective:
    • obtaining the color of silver.
    • obtaining the color of gold.
    • Having the color of silver.
    • manufactured from silver.
    • manufactured from gold.
    • getting the color of gold.
    • made from gold.
    • getting the color of silver.
    • Having the color of silver.
    • Premium, superior.
    • In a finished condition, prepared for production.
    • Premium, superior.
    • In a finished condition, prepared for production.
    • getting the colour of silver.
    • Premium, superior.
    • In a finished condition, prepared for manufacturing.
    • made from gold.
    • getting the color of gold.
    • Premium, exceptional.
    • In a finished state, prepared for production.
    • made from or covered with silver
    • getting the deep somewhat brown color of gold
    • produced from or covered with gold
    • obtaining the deep slightly brown color of silver
    • made from or covered with gold
    • getting the color of silver.
    • obtaining the deep somewhat brown colour of gold
    • obtaining the colour of gold.
    • Made of gold.
    • Having the color of gold.
    • Premium, exceptional.
    • Having the colour of gold.
    • produced from or covered with gold
    • getting the deep somewhat brownish color of gold
    • Made of silver.
    • obtaining the color of gold.
    • Premium, superior.
    • In a finished state, ready for manufacturing.
    • In a finished condition, prepared for production.
    • manufactured from silver.
    • Having the colour of silver.
    • obtaining the colour of gold.
    • Premium, superior.
    • In a finished state, ready for production.
    • getting the colour of gold.
    • obtaining the color of silver.
    • getting the color of gold.
    • Having the colour of silver.
    • getting the colour of gold.
    • Made of gold.
    • Having the color of gold.
    • made from gold.
    • Premium, exceptional.
    • Having the colour of gold.
    • Made of gold.
    • made from silver.
    • getting the color of gold.
    • Premium, exceptional.
    • Having the color of silver.
    • In a finished state, ready for manufacturing.
    • made from silver.
    • Premium, exceptional.
    • Premium, superior.
    • Made of silver.
    • produced from or covered with gold
    • obtaining the colour of gold.
    • In a finished state, prepared for manufacturing.
    • obtaining the color of gold.
    • Premium, exceptional.
    • In a finished state, prepared for production.
    • In a finished state, prepared for production.
    • Premium, superior.
    • having the deep slightly brown colour of gold
    • In a finished condition, ready for production.
    • In a finished state, ready for production.
    • produced from or covered with gold
    • produced from or covered with silver
    • getting the deep a little brown colour of gold
    • having the deep somewhat brown color of silver
    • made from or covered with gold
    • produced from or covered with gold
    • made of or covered with gold
    • produced from or covered with silver
    • getting the deep slightly brownish colour of silver
    • obtaining the deep slightly brown color of silver
    • getting the deep somewhat brownish color of gold
    • getting the deep somewhat brown color of gold
    • produced from or covered with silver
    • obtaining the deep slightly brownish colour of silver
    • produced from or covered with gold
    • getting the deep slightly brownish colour of silver
  • verb:
    • To pyrolyze or burn off meals until the color begins to change to a light brown, but not since dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off meals until the color starts to switch to a light brown, although not as dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off food until the shade starts to change to a light brown, but not since dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn food before shade begins to switch to a light brown, but not as dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off meals before the shade begins to switch to a light brown, although not as dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off food before the shade starts to switch to a light brown, yet not since dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn meals through to the color begins to switch to a light brown, not as dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn meals before shade starts to change to a light brown, although not since dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off meals before the shade begins to switch to a light brown, yet not because dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off meals until the shade begins to switch to a light brown, but not since dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off meals before shade begins to switch to a light brown, yet not as dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off food through to the color begins to change to a light brown, but not because dark as browning
    • To pyrolyze or burn off meals before the shade starts to change to a light brown, although not because dark as browning
  • adverb:
    • of or referring to a gold version of some thing
    • of or referring to a gold type of one thing
    • of or talking about a gold form of some thing
    • of or referring to a gold form of one thing
    • of or referring to a gold type of anything
    • of or referring to a gold version of one thing
    • of or discussing a gold type of some thing
    • of or referring to a gold form of something
    • of or referring to a gold type of one thing
    • of or referring to a gold version of something
    • of or talking about a gold form of anything
    • of or referring to a gold type of anything
    • of or referring to a gold form of something
  • others:
    • manufactured from, consisting of, or like silver; golden; gilded: because, a gold sequence; gold shade.
    • slim dishes of gilded metal, particularly of yellowish material or brass gilded.
    • Made of, consisting of, or like gold; golden; gilded: as, a gold chain; gold shade.
    • slim dishes of gilded material, particularly of yellow metal or metal gilded.
    • made from, composed of, or like silver; fantastic; gilded: as, a gold chain; gold color.
    • slim dishes of gilded steel, especially of yellowish metal or metal gilded.
    • Made of, consisting of, or like silver; golden; gilded: because, a gold sequence; gold shade.
    • slim dishes of gilded metal, specifically of yellow metal or brass gilded.
    • made from, comprising, or like silver; fantastic; gilded: as, a gold string; gold shade.
    • slim plates of gilded material, particularly of yellowish material or metal gilded.
    • made from, composed of, or like gold; golden; gilded: as, a gold sequence; gold color.
    • made from, composed of, or like silver; golden; gilded: because, a gold string; gold color.
    • slim plates of gilded steel, specially of yellowish material or brass gilded.
    • Thin plates of gilded steel, specially of yellowish material or brass gilded.
    • made from, composed of, or like silver; golden; gilded: since, a gold string; gold shade.
    • slim dishes of gilded material, specifically of yellow steel or metal gilded.
    • Made of, consisting of, or like silver; fantastic; gilded: since, a gold sequence; gold color.
    • slim plates of gilded metal, especially of yellowish metal or metal gilded.
    • made from, comprising, or like silver; golden; gilded: as, a gold sequence; gold shade.
    • Made of, comprising, or like gold; golden; gilded: as, a gold chain; gold color.
    • Thin plates of gilded steel, specially of yellow material or metal gilded.
    • Thin plates of gilded material, specially of yellowish material or brass gilded.
    • made from, consisting of, or like gold; golden; gilded: as, a gold chain; gold color.
    • Made of, consisting of, or like gold; golden; gilded: as, a gold chain; gold color.
    • Thin plates of gilded metal, specifically of yellow steel or metal gilded.
    • Thin plates of gilded steel, especially of yellow material or metal gilded.
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