glasswort definition

  • noun:
    • any one of various flowers associated with the genus Salicornia, developing in sodium marshes and having fleshy stems and rudimentary, scalelike leaves. Also called samphire.
    • The plant associated with the genus Salicornia, once burned to make the ash regularly make soda glass.
    • some of the edible plants known as samphire.
    • A seashore plant regarding the Spinach family members (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; additionally, a prickly plant of the identical family (Salsola Kali), both formerly burned in the interests of the ashes, which give soft drink to make glass and soap.
    • A plant of chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline flowers with leafless jointed stems and containing a large proportion of soda.
    • About 6 species of glasswort (Salicornia) are now reported to be present in North America, inhabiting mainly the salt-marshes associated with shore, but occasionally (exactly the same or various types) developing on saline ground inland. S. herbacea, the slender or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also known as pickle-plant), as well as S. Bigelovii, transforms a vivid red in autumn, becoming extremely showy regarding the Atlantic coastline, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also referred to as pickle-weed), gift suggestions a diversity of brilliant color jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • bushy plant of old-world sodium marshes and sea shores having prickly leaves; burned to create a crude soft drink ash
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with rudimentary scalelike leaves and little spikes of minute plants; previously found in making glass
    • any one of different flowers of the genus Salicornia, growing in sodium marshes and having fleshy stems and standard, scalelike leaves. Also known as samphire.
    • Any of various flowers of the genus Salicornia, growing in salt marshes and achieving fleshy stems and standard, scalelike leaves. Also known as samphire.
    • any one of various flowers associated with genus Salicornia, developing in salt marshes and having fleshy stems and rudimentary, scalelike leaves. Also called samphire.
    • The plant for the genus Salicornia, once burned to create the ash always make soft drink cup.
    • The plant of genus Salicornia, once burned to create the ash used to make soft drink cup.
    • The plant associated with the genus Salicornia, once burned to produce the ash used to make soft drink cup.
    • Any of the edible plants known as samphire.
    • some of the edible plants called samphire.
    • A seashore plant regarding the Spinach household (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; additionally, a prickly plant of the same household (Salsola Kali), both previously burned with regard to the ashes, which give soft drink in making glass and detergent.
    • A seashore plant of the Spinach household (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; in addition, a prickly plant of the same household (Salsola Kali), both previously burned in the interests of the ashes, which yield soft drink in making glass and detergent.
    • A plant regarding the chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline plants with leafless jointed stems and containing a big proportion of soda.
    • A plant of this chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline flowers with leafless jointed stems and containing a large percentage of soda.
    • About 6 types of glasswort (Salicornia) are actually reported to be within the united states, inhabiting primarily the salt-marshes regarding the coast, but occasionally (the exact same or various species) developing on saline ground inland. S. herbacea, the slender or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also referred to as pickle-plant), with S. Bigelovii, turns a vivid red in autumn, becoming really showy regarding Atlantic shore, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also referred to as pickle-weed), presents a diversity of brilliant shade jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • About 6 types of glasswort (Salicornia) are actually considered present in united states, inhabiting primarily the salt-marshes of coastline, but sometimes (the same or various species) growing on saline surface inland. S. herbacea, the slim or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also called pickle-plant), along with S. Bigelovii, turns a vivid red in autumn, becoming extremely showy in the Atlantic shore, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also called pickle-weed), provides a diversity of brilliant shade jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • bushy plant of Old World salt marshes and sea shores having prickly leaves; burned to produce a crude soft drink ash
    • bushy plant of Old World sodium marshes and sea beaches having prickly leaves; burned to make a crude soda ash
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with standard scalelike leaves and small surges of minute flowers; previously utilized in making cup
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with standard scalelike leaves and little surges of small plants; previously utilized in making glass
    • some of different plants associated with the genus Salicornia, developing in salt marshes and achieving fleshy stems and rudimentary, scalelike leaves. Also called samphire.
    • some of different flowers for the genus Salicornia, developing in salt marshes and achieving fleshy stems and rudimentary, scalelike leaves. Also known as samphire.
    • The plant associated with genus Salicornia, as soon as burned to create the ash always make soft drink glass.
    • The plant regarding the genus Salicornia, once burned to create the ash accustomed make soda cup.
    • some of the edible flowers known as samphire.
    • the delicious flowers called samphire.
    • A seashore plant associated with the Spinach household (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; in addition, a prickly plant of the same family members (Salsola Kali), both formerly burned with regard to the ashes, which yield soft drink to make cup and soap.
    • A seashore plant associated with Spinach household (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; also, a prickly plant of the same family members (Salsola Kali), both formerly burned for the sake of the ashes, which yield soft drink to make cup and detergent.
    • any one of various plants of genus Salicornia, growing in salt marshes and having fleshy stems and rudimentary, scalelike leaves. Also known as samphire.
    • some of the delicious plants called samphire.
    • A plant regarding the chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline flowers with leafless jointed stems and containing a sizable percentage of soft drink.
    • The plant regarding the genus Salicornia, when burned to produce the ash accustomed make soft drink glass.
    • A plant of this chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline plants with leafless jointed stems and containing a large proportion of soft drink.
    • About 6 types of glasswort (Salicornia) are now considered within united states, inhabiting mainly the salt-marshes associated with the coast, but sometimes (the same or various species) developing on saline ground inland. S. herbacea, the slender or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also known as pickle-plant), and S. Bigelovii, converts a vivid red in autumn, becoming really showy on the Atlantic shore, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also referred to as pickle-weed), gift suggestions a diversity of brilliant shade jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • A seashore plant for the Spinach family (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; also, a prickly plant of the identical household (Salsola Kali), both previously burned in the interests of the ashes, which give soda in making glass and detergent.
    • About 6 species of glasswort (Salicornia) are actually said to be present in united states, inhabiting primarily the salt-marshes associated with the shore, but often (exactly the same or various types) growing on saline surface inland. S. herbacea, the thin or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also known as pickle-plant), as well as S. Bigelovii, transforms a vivid red in autumn, becoming extremely showy regarding the Atlantic coast, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also referred to as pickle-weed), provides a diversity of brilliant shade jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • some of the delicious plants called samphire.
    • A plant for the chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline flowers with leafless jointed stems and containing a big proportion of soft drink.
    • bushy plant of old-world salt marshes and ocean shores having prickly leaves; burned to create a crude soda ash
    • Any of various plants associated with genus Salicornia, growing in sodium marshes and achieving fleshy stems and standard, scalelike leaves. Also referred to as samphire.
    • A seashore plant of this Spinach household (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; additionally, a prickly plant of the same family (Salsola Kali), both formerly burned in the interests of the ashes, which give soda to make cup and detergent.
    • bushy plant of old-world sodium marshes and ocean shores having prickly leaves; burned to create a crude soft drink ash
    • The plant of this genus Salicornia, once burned to make the ash familiar with make soda cup.
    • About 6 species of glasswort (Salicornia) are now actually considered present in North America, inhabiting mainly the salt-marshes associated with coast, but sometimes (the exact same or various types) developing on saline floor inland. S. herbacea, the slim or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also called pickle-plant), with S. Bigelovii, transforms a vivid red in autumn, becoming extremely showy on Atlantic shore, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also known as pickle-weed), presents a diversity of brilliant shade jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • some of different plants associated with the genus Salicornia, growing in sodium marshes and achieving fleshy stems and standard, scalelike leaves. Also referred to as samphire.
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with standard scalelike leaves and small surges of minute blossoms; previously utilized in making cup
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with standard scalelike leaves and small surges of minute flowers; formerly utilized in making cup
    • A plant of chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline plants with leafless jointed stems and containing a big percentage of soft drink.
    • bushy plant of old-world salt marshes and water shores having prickly leaves; burned to create a crude soda ash
    • some of the delicious plants called samphire.
    • The plant of genus Salicornia, as soon as burned to create the ash always make soda cup.
    • About 6 species of glasswort (Salicornia) are now said to be within the united states, inhabiting mainly the salt-marshes of the coastline, but often (the exact same or different types) growing on saline floor inland. S. herbacea, the slender or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also referred to as pickle-plant), with S. Bigelovii, transforms a vivid red in autumn, becoming very showy regarding Atlantic shore, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also referred to as pickle-weed), presents a diversity of brilliant color jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • the delicious plants known as samphire.
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with rudimentary scalelike leaves and tiny surges of minute plants; formerly used in making cup
    • bushy plant of old-world sodium marshes and sea beaches having prickly leaves; burned to create a crude soft drink ash
    • A seashore plant regarding the Spinach household (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; in addition, a prickly plant of the same household (Salsola Kali), both previously burned for the sake of the ashes, which yield soft drink in making glass and detergent.
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with rudimentary scalelike leaves and little spikes of minute flowers; previously found in making glass
    • A plant of the chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline flowers with leafless jointed stems and containing a large percentage of soft drink.
    • About 6 species of glasswort (Salicornia) are now considered present in North America, inhabiting primarily the salt-marshes regarding the coastline, but sometimes (exactly the same or various types) growing on saline ground inland. S. herbacea, the slender or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also referred to as pickle-plant), as well as S. Bigelovii, converts a vivid red in autumn, becoming extremely showy in the Atlantic coast, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also known as pickle-weed), gift suggestions a diversity of brilliant color jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • bushy plant of Old World salt marshes and sea beaches having prickly leaves; burned to create a crude soft drink ash
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with rudimentary scalelike leaves and small surges of small plants; formerly used in making cup
    • A seashore plant associated with Spinach family members (Salicornia herbacea), with succulent jointed stems; also, a prickly plant of the same family (Salsola Kali), both formerly burned for the sake of the ashes, which give soft drink in making glass and detergent.
    • A plant of the chenopodiaceous genus Salicornia, succulent saline plants with leafless jointed stems and containing a sizable percentage of soda.
    • About 6 types of glasswort (Salicornia) are now reported to be found in united states, inhabiting primarily the salt-marshes regarding the shore, but sometimes (the same or different types) growing on saline ground inland. S. herbacea, the slim or jointed glasswort or marsh-samphire (also referred to as pickle-plant), as well as S. Bigelovii, transforms a vivid red in autumn, getting extremely showy on Atlantic coast, while S. ambigua, the woody glasswort (also known as pickle-weed), presents a diversity of brilliant color jn the Pacific salt-marshes.
    • bushy plant of Old World sodium marshes and sea shores having prickly leaves; burned to create a crude soda ash
    • fleshy maritime plant having fleshy stems with rudimentary scalelike leaves and tiny surges of minute flowers; previously found in making cup

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