• Definition for "ginseng"
    • any one of a few plants of this…
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ginseng definition

  • noun:
    • any one of a few plants of this genus Panax, particularly P. pseudoginseng of eastern Asia or P. quinquefolius of united states, having small greenish flowers grouped in umbels, palmately mixture leaves, and forked roots believed to have medicinal properties.
    • The origins of these plants.
    • Any of a few flowers, associated with genus Panax, having forked origins designed to have medicinal properties.
    • the source of these a plant, or an extract of the origins.
    • A plant for the genus Aralia, the source which is extremely valued as a medicine on the list of Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) is now therefore uncommon that the United states (A. quinquefolia) has actually mainly taken its location, and its own root happens to be articles of export from The united states to China. The main, whenever dried out, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness within the taste notably resembling that licorice, coupled with a slight fragrant bitterness.
    • A plant of this genus Aralia (Panax); additionally, the basis with this plant, which can be highly respected as a tonic and stimulant because of the Chinese, just who ascribe to it practically miraculous powers.
    • a few plants maybe not botanically linked to the ginseng have now been so named as having similar health properties, since, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • Chinese natural herb with palmately compound leaves and tiny greenish plants and forked aromatic roots considered to have medicinal capabilities
    • aromatic reason behind ginseng plants
    • some of a few flowers of genus Panax, specially P. pseudoginseng of eastern Asia or P. quinquefolius of North America, having small greenish blossoms grouped in umbels, palmately ingredient leaves, and forked roots believed to have medicinal properties.
    • The roots among these plants.
    • Any of a number of plants, regarding the genus Panax, having forked origins supposed to have medicinal properties.
    • the source of such a plant, or an extract of the origins.
    • A plant of this genus Aralia, the main of which is very respected as a medicine among the list of Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) has become so rare that the American (A. quinquefolia) has mainly taken its destination, and its particular root has become a write-up of export from America to Asia. The root, when dry, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness within the style somewhat resembling that of licorice, coupled with a small fragrant bitterness.
    • A plant for the genus Aralia (Panax); in addition, the root of the plant, that is highly valued as a tonic and stimulant because of the Chinese, just who ascribe to it nearly miraculous powers.
    • Several plants perhaps not botanically associated with the ginseng have already been so named as having comparable medical properties, as, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • Chinese herb with palmately mixture leaves and little greenish plants and forked aromatic origins thought to have medicinal capabilities
    • fragrant cause of ginseng plants
    • some of several flowers for the genus Panax, especially P. pseudoginseng of eastern Asia or P. quinquefolius of North America, having tiny greenish plants grouped in umbels, palmately substance leaves, and forked roots thought to have medicinal properties.
    • The origins of these flowers.
    • some of a few plants, of the genus Panax, having forked roots likely to have medicinal properties.
    • the main of such a plant, or an extract of the roots.
    • A plant associated with the genus Aralia, the main which is very respected as a medicine on the list of Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) happens to be therefore unusual that United states (A. quinquefolia) has actually largely taken its spot, and its own root has become articles of export from America to Asia. The source, whenever dry, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness inside flavor somewhat resembling that licorice, combined with a slight aromatic bitterness.
    • A plant associated with genus Aralia (Panax); additionally, the root of this plant, which will be extremely valued as a tonic and stimulant because of the Chinese, just who ascribe to it almost miraculous powers.
    • some of a number of flowers for the genus Panax, especially P. pseudoginseng of eastern Asia or P. quinquefolius of united states, having little greenish plants grouped in umbels, palmately mixture leaves, and forked roots believed to have medicinal properties.
    • some of several plants associated with the genus Panax, especially P. pseudoginseng of eastern Asia or P. quinquefolius of the united states, having little greenish plants grouped in umbels, palmately compound leaves, and forked origins thought to have medicinal properties.
    • The origins of those plants.
    • The roots of these flowers.
    • Any of a few plants, for the genus Panax, having forked roots supposed to have medicinal properties.
    • some of a number of flowers, of the genus Panax, having forked origins supposed to have medicinal properties.
    • The root of such a plant, or an extract among these origins.
    • Several plants perhaps not botanically regarding the ginseng have been so named as having comparable health properties, as, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • Chinese natural herb with palmately element leaves and tiny greenish flowers and forked aromatic origins believed to have medicinal abilities
    • aromatic cause of ginseng plants
    • A plant associated with the genus Aralia, the source of which is extremely respected as a medicine among the list of Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) is now therefore unusual your American (A. quinquefolia) has actually largely taken its location, and its own root has become articles of export from America to China. The main, when dry, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness in the flavor significantly resembling that of licorice, along with hook aromatic bitterness.
    • A plant of the genus Aralia (Panax); in addition, the root of this plant, that is very appreciated as a tonic and stimulant because of the Chinese, just who ascribe to it practically miraculous powers.
    • a number of flowers perhaps not botanically about the ginseng were so-named as possessing similar health properties, since, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • Chinese herb with palmately compound leaves and tiny greenish flowers and forked fragrant roots considered to have medicinal powers
    • aromatic cause of ginseng flowers
    • the source of these a plant, or an extract among these origins.
    • A plant regarding the genus Aralia, the root of which is extremely appreciated as a medicine among the list of Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) became so uncommon the American (A. quinquefolia) features mainly taken its place, as well as its root is currently an article of export from America to China. The basis, when dry, is of a yellowish white shade, with a sweetness inside style significantly resembling compared to licorice, along with a slight aromatic bitterness.
    • A plant associated with genus Aralia (Panax); additionally, the source for this plant, which is extremely respected as a tonic and stimulant by the Chinese, which ascribe to it virtually miraculous powers.
    • Several plants perhaps not botanically about the ginseng being so-named as possessing comparable medical properties, as, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • Chinese herb with palmately substance leaves and tiny greenish plants and forked aromatic roots believed to have medicinal capabilities
    • fragrant reason behind ginseng plants
    • any one of several plants associated with genus Panax, especially P. pseudoginseng of east Asia or P. quinquefolius of North America, having little greenish plants grouped in umbels, palmately element leaves, and forked roots thought to have medicinal properties.
    • The origins of the plants.
    • Any of a number of flowers, of genus Panax, having forked origins expected to have medicinal properties.
    • The root of these a plant, or an extract among these origins.
    • A plant of genus Aralia, the source that is highly respected as a medicine among the list of Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) is therefore uncommon your American (A. quinquefolia) features largely taken its destination, and its root happens to be a write-up of export from America to China. The root, whenever dried out, is of a yellowish white shade, with a sweetness into the taste significantly resembling that licorice, combined with a small aromatic bitterness.
    • A plant associated with the genus Aralia (Panax); additionally, the source with this plant, which will be very appreciated as a tonic and stimulant by the Chinese, just who ascribe to it very nearly miraculous abilities.
    • a few flowers maybe not botanically pertaining to the ginseng have been so named as possessing comparable medical properties, because, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • Any of a number of flowers of the genus Panax, specifically P. pseudoginseng of eastern Asia or P. quinquefolius of North America, having tiny greenish blossoms grouped in umbels, palmately ingredient leaves, and forked origins believed to have medicinal properties.
    • The roots of these plants.
    • some of a few flowers for the genus Panax, especially P. pseudoginseng of east Asia or P. quinquefolius of the united states, having little greenish flowers grouped in umbels, palmately mixture leaves, and forked origins believed to have medicinal properties.
    • The origins of the plants.
    • any one of a number of plants, regarding the genus Panax, having forked roots supposed to have medicinal properties.
    • The root of these a plant, or an extract among these roots.
    • A plant of genus Aralia, the basis which is highly appreciated as a medicine among the Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) has become so rare your American (A. quinquefolia) has actually mostly taken its destination, and its root happens to be articles of export from The united states to China. The source, when dry, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness inside flavor notably resembling compared to licorice, coupled with hook aromatic bitterness.
    • A plant associated with the genus Aralia (Panax); in addition, the basis with this plant, that will be very appreciated as a tonic and stimulant because of the Chinese, which ascribe to it nearly miraculous abilities.
    • a few plants perhaps not botanically pertaining to the ginseng are so named as having comparable medical properties, since, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • Chinese herb with palmately element leaves and little greenish plants and forked aromatic roots considered to have medicinal abilities
    • aromatic cause of ginseng plants
    • any one of a few flowers associated with the genus Panax, particularly P. pseudoginseng of east Asia or P. quinquefolius of the united states, having tiny greenish flowers grouped in umbels, palmately chemical leaves, and forked origins believed to have medicinal properties.
    • The roots of those flowers.
    • any one of a number of plants, associated with genus Panax, having forked origins likely to have medicinal properties.
    • Chinese natural herb with palmately substance leaves and little greenish plants and forked aromatic origins believed to have medicinal abilities
    • any one of several flowers of this genus Panax, particularly P. pseudoginseng of eastern Asia or P. quinquefolius of united states, having small greenish blossoms grouped in umbels, palmately chemical leaves, and forked origins believed to have medicinal properties.
    • any one of several flowers, of genus Panax, having forked origins supposed to have medicinal properties.
    • The origins of these flowers.
    • the source of these a plant, or an extract among these origins.
    • Any of a number of flowers, of genus Panax, having forked origins designed to have medicinal properties.
    • A plant regarding the genus Aralia, the main of which is extremely appreciated as a medicine one of the Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) is becoming so rare that the United states (A. quinquefolia) has largely taken its place, and its particular root is now a write-up of export from The united states to Asia. The source, whenever dry, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness when you look at the flavor notably resembling compared to licorice, combined with a small aromatic bitterness.
    • the source of these a plant, or an extract of the origins.
    • The root of these a plant, or an extract among these origins.
    • A plant of this genus Aralia, the source of which is very valued as a medicine among the Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) happens to be therefore rare the American (A. quinquefolia) has actually largely taken its place, and its own root is currently an article of export from The united states to China. The basis, whenever dried out, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness in style significantly resembling compared to licorice, combined with a small fragrant bitterness.
    • A plant for the genus Aralia (Panax); in addition, the basis of this plant, which will be extremely valued as a tonic and stimulant because of the Chinese, just who ascribe to it very nearly miraculous abilities.
    • A plant of genus Aralia, the root which is highly respected as a medicine one of the Chinese. The Chinese plant (Aralia Schinseng) happens to be so unusual that the American (A. quinquefolia) features mainly taken its place, and its root happens to be articles of export from The united states to Asia. The source, whenever dried out, is of a yellowish white color, with a sweetness within the flavor significantly resembling that licorice, coupled with hook aromatic bitterness.
    • A plant of genus Aralia (Panax); additionally, the root for this plant, which is highly respected as a tonic and stimulant by the Chinese, which ascribe to it almost miraculous powers.
    • aromatic reason behind ginseng plants
    • Several flowers maybe not botanically associated with the ginseng being so named as having comparable medical properties, since, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • A plant of genus Aralia (Panax); also, the source with this plant, that will be extremely respected as a tonic and stimulant by the Chinese, whom ascribe to it nearly miraculous powers.
    • a number of flowers not botanically pertaining to the ginseng have been so named as possessing similar health properties, because, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • a number of plants perhaps not botanically regarding the ginseng were so named as possessing comparable medical properties, because, in Georgia, the sunflower-like composite Tetragonotheca helianthoides.
    • Chinese herb with palmately substance leaves and tiny greenish plants and forked fragrant origins believed to have medicinal powers
    • Chinese herb with palmately ingredient leaves and small greenish blossoms and forked aromatic roots considered to have medicinal abilities
    • aromatic root of ginseng flowers
    • aromatic reason behind ginseng plants
    • Chinese natural herb with palmately chemical leaves and tiny greenish plants and forked aromatic origins thought to have medicinal abilities
    • fragrant cause of ginseng plants
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