gingko definition

  • noun:
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree native to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and delicious, fleshy yellow seeds, with no known close residing family members.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree native to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and delicious, fleshy yellowish seeds, without any understood close residing family relations.
    • The Japanese title (in addition present in western nations) associated with maidenhair-tree, followed by Linnæus (1771) as the generic name; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). In addition written gingo and ginkgo.
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • The Japanese title (also current in western nations) associated with the maidenhair-tree, used by Linnæus (1771) as its generic name; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). Additionally written gingo and ginkgo.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree indigenous to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and edible, fleshy yellow seeds, with no understood close residing family relations.
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous woods, allied to your yew (Taxus), with diœcious blossoms, a drupaceous one-seeded fresh fruit, and distinct fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous trees, allied to your yew (Taxus), with diœcious flowers, a drupaceous one-seeded fresh fruit, and particular fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellowish seeds; is present practically exclusively in cultivation specially as an ornamental road tree
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree native to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and edible, fleshy yellow seeds, without understood close living family members.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellow seeds; exists nearly solely in cultivation especially as an ornamental street tree
    • japan name (in addition current in western countries) of maidenhair-tree, used by Linnæus (1771) as the common name; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). Also written gingo and ginkgo.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous woods, allied to the yew (Taxus), with diœcious plants, a drupaceous one-seeded fruit, and particular fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellowish seeds; exists nearly exclusively in cultivation specially as an ornamental road tree
    • japan name (also existing in western countries) of the maidenhair-tree, adopted by Linnæus (1771) as its general name; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). In addition written gingo and ginkgo.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous trees, allied towards yew (Taxus), with diœcious plants, a drupaceous one-seeded good fresh fruit, and strange fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellow seeds; is out there practically solely in cultivation specifically as an ornamental road tree
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree native to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and delicious, fleshy yellow seeds, without any understood close living relatives.
    • The Japanese name (additionally current in western nations) regarding the maidenhair-tree, followed by Linnæus (1771) as its common name; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). Also written gingo and ginkgo.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous trees, allied into yew (Taxus), with diœcious flowers, a drupaceous one-seeded good fresh fruit, and strange fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellow seeds; is present virtually exclusively in cultivation particularly as an ornamental road tree
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree native to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and edible, fleshy yellowish seeds, with no known close living family relations.
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree indigenous to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and delicious, fleshy yellowish seeds, without understood close living loved ones.
    • The Japanese name (also current in western countries) of the maidenhair-tree, adopted by Linnæus (1771) as its generic name; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). Also written gingo and ginkgo.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous trees, allied towards the yew (Taxus), with diœcious flowers, a drupaceous one-seeded fresh fruit, and strange fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellowish seeds; is out there almost solely in cultivation particularly as an ornamental road tree
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • The Japanese name (also current in western countries) of the maidenhair-tree, adopted by Linnæus (1771) as its generic name; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). Also written gingo and ginkgo.
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree indigenous to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and edible, fleshy yellowish seeds, without any understood close living family relations.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous trees, allied to your yew (Taxus), with diœcious plants, a drupaceous one-seeded fresh fruit, and distinct fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • Variant of ginkgo.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree indigenous to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and edible, fleshy yellow seeds, without understood close residing family relations.
    • The Japanese title (additionally current in western nations) of maidenhair-tree, used by Linnæus (1771) as its common title; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). Additionally written gingo and ginkgo.
    • The Ginkgo biloba, a tree indigenous to East Asia having fan-shaped leaves and delicious, fleshy yellowish seeds, with no known close residing relatives.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellow seeds; is out there nearly solely in cultivation particularly as an ornamental road tree
    • The Japanese title (additionally existing in western countries) regarding the maidenhair-tree, adopted by Linnæus (1771) as its common title; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). In addition written gingo and ginkgo.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous trees, allied to your yew (Taxus), with diœcious flowers, a drupaceous one-seeded fresh fruit, and distinct fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous woods, allied on yew (Taxus), with diœcious blossoms, a drupaceous one-seeded fresh fruit, and distinct fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • The Japanese name (also current in western countries) of the maidenhair-tree, adopted by Linnæus (1771) as its generic name; the Salisburia adiantifolia of Sir J. E. Smith (1796). Also written gingo and ginkgo.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellowish seeds; is out there virtually solely in cultivation particularly as an ornamental road tree
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellow seeds; is out there almost exclusively in cultivation particularly as an ornamental road tree
    • [capitalized] [NL.] A genus of gymnospermous trees, allied toward yew (Taxus), with diœcious flowers, a drupaceous one-seeded fresh fruit, and peculiar fan-shaped deciduous leaves.
    • deciduous dioecious Chinese tree having fan-shaped leaves and fleshy yellow seeds; is present nearly exclusively in cultivation particularly as an ornamental street tree

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  • Hypernym for "gingko"
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