gerund definition

  • noun:
    • In Latin, a noun derived from a verb and achieving all situation forms except the nominative.
    • various other languages, a verbal noun analogous into Latin gerund, such as the English form ending in -ing whenever used as a noun, such as performing in We admired the choir's singing.
    • A verbal kind that works as a verbal noun. (In English, a gerund has the exact same spelling as a present-day participle, but functions differently.)
    • in certain languages particularly Italian or Russian, a verbal form like a present participle, but working as an adverb. These words are now and again named conjunctive participles.
    • some sort of spoken noun, having only the four oblique cases associated with singular number, and governing situations like a participle.
    • A verbal noun closing in -e, preceded by to and in most cases denoting function or end; -- labeled as also the dative infinitive; because, “Ic hæbbe mete tô etanne” (We have animal meat to consume.) In contemporary English the name happens to be applied to verbal or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive activity; e. g., by putting a stone.
    • The name given originally by grammarians to a Latin spoken noun, found in oblique situations with an infinitival value: as, amandi, amando, amandum, ‘loving’; for this reason used in addition in other languages to significantly kindred formations: age. g., in Sanskrit to kinds in tvā, ya, etc., obtaining the worth of indeclinable adjectives: as, gatvā, -gatya, ‘going’; in Anglo-Saxon to a dative infinitive after tō: as, gōd tō etanne, ‘good to consume’ (which, ‘good for eating’). Abbreviated ger.
    • a noun formed from a verb (for instance the `-ing' form of an English verb whenever utilized as a noun)
    • In Latin, a noun derived from a verb and having all case forms except the nominative.
    • In other languages, a verbal noun analogous to the Latin gerund, including the English form closing in -ing whenever utilized as a noun, such as singing in We admired the choir's performing.
    • A verbal type that works as a verbal noun. (In English, a gerund gets the exact same spelling as a present participle, but functions differently.)
    • in a few languages such as for instance Italian or Russian, a verbal kind similar to something special participle, but working as an adverb. These terms are now and again known as conjunctive participles.
    • a type of verbal noun, having just the four oblique instances associated with the single quantity, and governing cases like a participle.
    • In Latin, a noun produced by a verb and having all case kinds except the nominative.
    • In other languages, a verbal noun analogous toward Latin gerund, like the English kind closing in -ing when utilized as a noun, as in performing in We admired the choir's singing.
    • A verbal form that operates as a verbal noun. (In English, a gerund gets the exact same spelling as something special participle, but functions differently.)
    • In some languages particularly Italian or Russian, a verbal kind comparable to something special participle, but operating as an adverb. These words are now and again called conjunctive participles.
    • A kind of spoken noun, having just the four oblique situations of this single number, and regulating situations like a participle.
    • A verbal noun ending in -e, preceded by to and often denoting purpose or end; -- labeled as in addition the dative infinitive; because, “Ic hæbbe mete tô etanne” (i've beef to consume.) In contemporary English title happens to be applied to spoken or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive activity; e. g., by tossing a stone.
    • The name provided originally by grammarians to a Latin verbal noun, found in oblique instances with an infinitival worth: as, amandi, amando, amandum, ‘loving’; thus applied in addition various other languages to somewhat kindred formations: age. g., in Sanskrit to forms in tvā, ya, etc., obtaining the value of indeclinable adjectives: as, gatvā, -gatya, ‘going’; in Anglo-Saxon to a dative infinitive after tō: as, gōd tō etanne, ‘good to eat’ (this is certainly, ‘good for eating’). Abbreviated ger.
    • a noun formed from a verb (for instance the `-ing' kind of an English verb whenever made use of as a noun)
    • In Latin, a noun produced from a verb and achieving all situation kinds except the nominative.
    • A verbal noun closing in -e, preceded by to and usually denoting function or end; -- labeled as also the dative infinitive; as, “Ic hæbbe mete tô etanne” (i've meat to eat.) In Modern English title was put on verbal or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive activity; e. g., by tossing a stone.
    • In other languages, a verbal noun analogous into Latin gerund, for instance the English kind closing in -ing when used as a noun, as with performing in We admired the choir's singing.
    • A verbal type that operates as a verbal noun. (In English, a gerund gets the same spelling as something special participle, but features differently.)
    • in certain languages such as Italian or Russian, a verbal form like a present-day participle, but working as an adverb. These terms are now and again referred to as conjunctive participles.
    • some sort of spoken noun, having only the four oblique cases regarding the single number, and regulating situations like a participle.
    • A verbal noun closing in -e, preceded by to and usually denoting function or end; -- called also the dative infinitive; because, “Ic hæbbe mete tô etanne” (i've meat to eat.) In contemporary English the name happens to be put on verbal or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive activity; e. g., by tossing a stone.
    • The name given originally by grammarians to a Latin verbal noun, used in oblique cases with an infinitival value: as, amandi, amando, amandum, ‘loving’; hence applied also in other languages to somewhat kindred formations: e. g., in Sanskrit to forms in tvā, ya, etc., having the value of indeclinable adjectives: as, gatvā, -gatya, ‘going’; in Anglo-Saxon to a dative infinitive after tō: as, gōd tō etanne, ‘good to eat’ (that is, ‘good for eating’). Abbreviated ger.
    • a noun created from a verb (such as the `-ing' kind of an English verb when made use of as a noun)
    • title offered originally by grammarians to a Latin spoken noun, utilized in oblique instances with an infinitival worth: as, amandi, amando, amandum, ‘loving’; thus used also various other languages to somewhat kindred formations: age. g., in Sanskrit to types in tvā, ya, etc., having the value of indeclinable adjectives: as, gatvā, -gatya, ‘going’; in Anglo-Saxon to a dative infinitive after tō: as, gōd tō etanne, ‘good to consume’ (that's, ‘good for eating’). Abbreviated ger.
    • a noun formed from a verb (such as the `-ing' form of an English verb whenever made use of as a noun)
    • In Latin, a noun produced from a verb and achieving all instance types except the nominative.
    • In other languages, a verbal noun analogous on Latin gerund, including the English form ending in -ing whenever made use of as a noun, such as singing in We admired the choir's performing.
    • A verbal form that functions as a verbal noun. (In English, a gerund has the exact same spelling as a present-day participle, but functions differently.)
    • In some languages like Italian or Russian, a verbal form similar to something special participle, but working as an adverb. These words are often known as conjunctive participles.
    • some sort of spoken noun, having only the four oblique situations for the singular number, and governing cases like a participle.
    • A verbal noun ending in -e, preceded by to and often denoting function or end; -- called additionally the dative infinitive; as, “Ic hæbbe mete tô etanne” (i've animal meat for eating.) In Modern English the name happens to be applied to spoken or participal nouns in -ing denoting a transitive activity; e. g., by tossing a stone.
    • title given initially by grammarians to a Latin verbal noun, utilized in oblique cases with an infinitival value: because, amandi, amando, amandum, ‘loving’; therefore used in addition various other languages to notably kindred formations: e. g., in Sanskrit to types in tvā, ya, etc., having the value of indeclinable adjectives: as, gatvā, -gatya, ‘going’; in Anglo-Saxon to a dative infinitive after tō: as, gōd tō etanne, ‘good to eat’ (that is, ‘good for eating’). Abbreviated ger.
    • a noun formed from a verb (such as the `-ing' kind of an English verb whenever used as a noun)

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  • Definition for "gerund"
    • In Latin, a noun derived from a verb…
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  • Sentence for "gerund"
  • Hypernym for "gerund"
  • Variant for "gerund"
  • Urban Dictionary for "gerund"
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