geometry definition

  • noun:
    • The mathematics of this properties, dimension, and connections of points, lines, sides, surfaces, and solids.
    • something of geometry: Euclidean geometry.
    • A geometry restricted to a class of problems or items: solid geometry.
    • A book on geometry.
    • Configuration; arrangement.
    • A surface form.
    • A physical arrangement recommending geometric types or outlines.
    • the part of math dealing with spatial connections
    • a type of geometry with specific properties
    • the spatial qualities of an object, etc.
    • That branch of math which investigates the relations, properties, and dimension of solids, surfaces, outlines, and angles; the technology which treats for the properties and relations of magnitudes; the science regarding the relations of area.
    • A treatise on this science.
    • That part of mathematics which deduces the properties of figures in area from their particular determining problems, by way of assumed properties of room. Abbreviated geometry
    • A text-book of geometry.
    • Modern projective geometry, commonly printed in German Geometrie der Lage, to differentiate it from .
    • Higher artificial geometry generally speaking.
    • the skill of geometrical design.
    • Geometry of three dimensions.
    • The oldest classification of geometry is , that by which its divided in line with the way of logical process, particularly into artificial and analytic, the technique of geometrical evaluation having come to exist or taught by Plato. Today this classification intertwines with another, specifically , that which is founded on the mental tool or gear made use of, offering: pure or synthetic geometry; logical; descriptive; projective; algebraic, algorithmic, analytical, Cartesian, or coördinate; differential, infinitesimal, normal, or intrinsic; enumerative or denumerative. A few of these are subdivided for a passing fancy principle, as: (α) geometry for the ruler or straight-edge; (β) for the ruler and sect-carrier; (γ) of this ruler and unitsect-carrier; (δ) of this compasses; of ruler and compasses; (ζ) of linkages. Additional divisions tend to be: By dimensionality: geometry on straight or on the line; two-dimensional geometry; (α) plane geometry; (β) spherics; (γ) pseudo-spherics; tri-dimensional geometry: (α) geometry of planes; (β) solid geometry; (γ) spherics; four-dimensional geometry: (α) geometry of straight?; (β) of hyperspace; n-dimeimonal geometry. By elements: point geometry; straight or line; plane; point, straight, and jet; straightest or geodesic; geometry for the sphere; of other elements, By subject-matter: pure descriptive, pure projective, or pure positional geometry, or geometry of place; topologic geometry; metric geometry; geometry of curves; of areas; of solids; of hyper-solids; of figures; of motion or kinematic. By assumptions made, omitted, or denied: Euclidean geometry; non-Euclidean; metageometry, or pan-geometry; finite geometry; semi-Euclidean; non-Legendrian; Archimedean; non-Archimedean; non-Arguesian; non-Pascalian. Because of the sort of space or universe for the geometry: Euclidean or parabolic geometry; Bolyaian, Lobachevskian, Bolyai-Lobachevskian, absolute, or hyperbolic; Riemannian, spherical, or double elliptic; Killing's, solitary elliptic, or easy elliptic; Clifford's or Clifford-Kleinian. Because of the complexity or difficulty associated with the component managed: elementary geometry; greater, By the period of its development: ancient or even the antique geometry; contemporary; present, regarding the triangle, and/or Lemoine-Brocard.
    • the pure mathematics of things and lines and curves and surfaces
    • The mathematics regarding the properties, measurement, and interactions of things, lines, perspectives, areas, and solids.
    • something of geometry: Euclidean geometry.
    • A geometry restricted to a class of dilemmas or things: solid geometry.
    • a novel on geometry.
    • Configuration; arrangement.
    • The math associated with properties, dimension, and connections of points, lines, sides, areas, and solids.
    • The math associated with the properties, measurement, and relationships of things, outlines, angles, areas, and solids.
    • A surface shape.
    • something of geometry: Euclidean geometry.
    • A physical arrangement recommending geometric forms or outlines.
    • a method of geometry: Euclidean geometry.
    • the branch of mathematics coping with spatial interactions
    • A geometry limited to a class of issues or items: solid geometry.
    • a form of geometry with certain properties
    • the spatial characteristics of an object, etc.
    • A geometry restricted to a class of issues or objects: solid geometry.
    • A book on geometry.
    • Configuration; arrangement.
    • A surface form.
    • A physical arrangement suggesting geometric kinds or outlines.
    • the branch of math dealing with spatial relationships
    • a type of geometry with particular properties
    • the spatial characteristics of an object, etc.
    • That branch of mathematics which investigates the relations, properties, and dimension of solids, areas, lines, and sides; the research which treats associated with the properties and relations of magnitudes; the research of the relations of room.
    • A treatise on this science.
    • That branch of mathematics which deduces the properties of numbers in space from their particular defining problems, through thought properties of room. Abbreviated geometry
    • A text-book of geometry.
    • A book on geometry.
    • Configuration; arrangement.
    • contemporary projective geometry, frequently printed in German Geometrie der Lage, to distinguish it from .
    • A surface shape.
    • That branch of mathematics which investigates the relations, properties, and dimension of solids, areas, outlines, and sides; the research which treats associated with properties and relations of magnitudes; the technology associated with relations of space.
    • Higher artificial geometry as a whole.
    • A physical arrangement suggesting geometric kinds or lines.
    • A treatise with this technology.
    • The art of geometrical drawing.
    • the branch of math coping with spatial connections
    • That branch of math which deduces the properties of figures in space from their particular defining conditions, through presumed properties of area. Abbreviated geometry
    • Geometry of three dimensions.
    • a form of geometry with particular properties
    • The earliest classification of geometry is , that where its divided based on the method of logical process, particularly into artificial and analytic, the technique of geometrical evaluation having come to exist or taught by Plato. In modern times this category intertwines with another, namely , whatever is dependant on the psychological tool or gear utilized, giving: pure or synthetic geometry; logical; descriptive; projective; algebraic, algorithmic, analytical, Cartesian, or coördinate; differential, infinitesimal, natural, or intrinsic; enumerative or denumerative. Some of these are subdivided on a single concept, as: (α) geometry of ruler or straight-edge; (β) of ruler and sect-carrier; (γ) of the ruler and unitsect-carrier; (δ) of compasses; for the ruler and compasses; (ζ) of linkages. Further divisions tend to be: By dimensionality: geometry from the straight or exactly in danger; two-dimensional geometry; (α) airplane geometry; (β) spherics; (γ) pseudo-spherics; tri-dimensional geometry: (α) geometry of planes; (β) solid geometry; (γ) spherics; four-dimensional geometry: (α) geometry of right?; (β) of hyperspace; n-dimeimonal geometry. By elements: point geometry; straight or range; plane; point, right, and plane; straightest or geodesic; geometry for the sphere; of various other elements, By subject-matter: pure descriptive, pure projective, or pure positional geometry, or geometry of position; topologic geometry; metric geometry; geometry of curves; of surfaces; of solids; of hyper-solids; of numbers; of movement or kinematic. By presumptions made, omitted, or denied: Euclidean geometry; non-Euclidean; metageometry, or pan-geometry; finite geometry; semi-Euclidean; non-Legendrian; Archimedean; non-Archimedean; non-Arguesian; non-Pascalian. By the variety of area or universe for the geometry: Euclidean or parabolic geometry; Bolyaian, Lobachevskian, Bolyai-Lobachevskian, absolute, or hyperbolic; Riemannian, spherical, or double elliptic; Killing's, solitary elliptic, or simple elliptic; Clifford's or Clifford-Kleinian. Because of the complexity or trouble associated with the component treated: primary geometry; greater, By the amount of its development: old or even the classic geometry; contemporary; present, of triangle, or even the Lemoine-Brocard.
    • the spatial attributes of an object, etc.
    • A text-book of geometry.
    • That part of math which investigates the relations, properties, and dimension of solids, areas, outlines, and sides; the technology which treats of the properties and relations of magnitudes; the research of the relations of space.
    • the pure math of points and lines and curves and surfaces
    • Modern projective geometry, frequently printed in German Geometrie der Lage, to tell apart it from .
    • Higher artificial geometry in general.
    • A treatise with this research.
    • the skill of geometrical drawing.
    • That part of mathematics which deduces the properties of numbers in space from their particular determining problems, by means of assumed properties of room. Abbreviated geometry
    • A text-book of geometry.
    • Geometry of three dimensions.
    • contemporary projective geometry, generally written in German Geometrie der Lage, to tell apart it from .
    • The oldest classification of geometry is , that in which it is divided according to the method of logical procedure, namely into synthetic and analytic, the method of geometrical analysis having been invented or taught by Plato. In modern times this classification intertwines with another, namely , that which is based on the mental instrument or equipment used, giving: pure or synthetic geometry; rational; descriptive; projective; algebraic, algorithmic, analytical, Cartesian, or coördinate; differential, infinitesimal, natural, or intrinsic; enumerative or denumerative. Some of these are subdivided on the same principle, as: (α) geometry of the ruler or straight-edge; (β) of the ruler and sect-carrier; (γ) of the ruler and unitsect-carrier; (δ) of the compasses; of the ruler and compasses; (ζ) of linkages. Further divisions are: By dimensionality: geometry on the straight or on the line; two-dimensional geometry; (α) plane geometry; (β) spherics; (γ) pseudo-spherics; tri-dimensional geometry: (α) geometry of planes; (β) solid geometry; (γ) spherics; four-dimensional geometry: (α) geometry of straight?; (β) of hyperspace; n-dimeimonal geometry. By elements: point geometry; straight or line; plane; point, straight, and plane; straightest or geodesic; geometry of the sphere; of other elements, By subject-matter: pure descriptive, pure projective, or pure positional geometry, or geometry of position; topologic geometry; metric geometry; geometry of curves; of surfaces; of solids; of hyper-solids; of numbers; of motion or kinematic. By assumptions made, omitted, or denied: Euclidean geometry; non-Euclidean; metageometry, or pan-geometry; finite geometry; semi-Euclidean; non-Legendrian; Archimedean; non-Archimedean; non-Arguesian; non-Pascalian. By the kind of space or universe of the geometry: Euclidean or parabolic geometry; Bolyaian, Lobachevskian, Bolyai-Lobachevskian, absolute, or hyperbolic; Riemannian, spherical, or double elliptic; Killing's, single elliptic, or simple elliptic; Clifford's or Clifford-Kleinian. By the complexity or difficulty of the part treated: elementary geometry; higher, By the period of its development: ancient or the antique geometry; modern; recent, of the triangle, or the Lemoine-Brocard.
    • the pure math of things and outlines and curves and surfaces
    • greater synthetic geometry generally.
    • the skill of geometrical drawing.
    • Geometry of three measurements.
    • The oldest category of geometry is , that for which its divided in line with the approach to logical process, namely into synthetic and analytic, the method of geometrical analysis having been invented or taught by Plato. Today this classification intertwines with another, particularly , whatever will be based upon the psychological tool or equipment made use of, offering: pure or synthetic geometry; rational; descriptive; projective; algebraic, algorithmic, analytical, Cartesian, or coördinate; differential, infinitesimal, all-natural, or intrinsic; enumerative or denumerative. Some of these are subdivided on a single concept, as: (α) geometry of the ruler or straight-edge; (β) of the ruler and sect-carrier; (γ) associated with the ruler and unitsect-carrier; (δ) for the compasses; associated with ruler and compasses; (ζ) of linkages. Additional divisions tend to be: By dimensionality: geometry in the right or on the line; two-dimensional geometry; (α) plane geometry; (β) spherics; (γ) pseudo-spherics; tri-dimensional geometry: (α) geometry of airplanes; (β) solid geometry; (γ) spherics; four-dimensional geometry: (α) geometry of right?; (β) of hyperspace; n-dimeimonal geometry. By elements: point geometry; right or line; jet; point, right, and plane; straightest or geodesic; geometry of this sphere; of various other elements, By subject-matter: pure descriptive, pure projective, or pure positional geometry, or geometry of position; topologic geometry; metric geometry; geometry of curves; of surfaces; of solids; of hyper-solids; of numbers; of movement or kinematic. By presumptions made, omitted, or denied: Euclidean geometry; non-Euclidean; metageometry, or pan-geometry; finite geometry; semi-Euclidean; non-Legendrian; Archimedean; non-Archimedean; non-Arguesian; non-Pascalian. Because of the style of space or world of geometry: Euclidean or parabolic geometry; Bolyaian, Lobachevskian, Bolyai-Lobachevskian, absolute, or hyperbolic; Riemannian, spherical, or two fold elliptic; Killing's, single elliptic, or simple elliptic; Clifford's or Clifford-Kleinian. By the complexity or difficulty of the component managed: primary geometry; higher, Because of the period of its development: ancient or even the antique geometry; modern; recent, regarding the triangle, or even the Lemoine-Brocard.
    • the pure mathematics of things and lines and curves and surfaces

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