genus definition

  • noun:
    • Biology A taxonomic category ranking below a family group and above a species and generally comprising a team of types exhibiting comparable traits. In taxonomic nomenclature the genus name is made use of, either alone or followed by a Latin adjective or epithet, to make the name of a species. See Table at taxonomy.
    • reasoning a course of things split into subordinate species having specific typical qualities.
    • a course, team, or type with common characteristics.
    • a rank in the classification of organisms, below household and above types; a taxon at that ranking
    • a bunch with common qualities
    • A number calculating some aspect of the complexity of every of various manifolds or graphs
    • Within a definition, a broader category of the defined idea.
    • a course of objects split into a few subordinate types; a class more extensive than a species; a precisely defined and precisely split class; the five predicable conceptions, or sorts of terms.
    • Biology A taxonomic category ranking below a household and above a species and generally composed of a group of species displaying similar attributes. In taxonomic nomenclature the genus name is made use of, either alone or followed by a Latin adjective or epithet, to form the name of a species. See Table at taxonomy.
    • Logic a course of items divided in to subordinate species having specific typical characteristics.
    • a course, group, or type with typical qualities.
    • a rank into the classification of organisms, below household and above species; a taxon at that position
    • A group with typical qualities
    • An assemblage of types, having so many fundamental things of construction in common, that in view of skilled researchers, they might receive a typical substantive name. A genus just isn't fundamentally the cheapest definable number of types, because of it may often be split into a number of subgenera. Equal in porportion as its meaning is exact, it really is normal genus; if its definition cannot be made clear, it's pretty much an artificial genus.
    • A kind; a sort; a course.
    • In zoology and botany, a classificatory group ranking next above the species, containing a group of species (sometimes a single species) possessing certain structural characters different from those of any others. The value assigned to a genus is wholly arbitrary—that is, it is entirely a matter of opinion or current usage what characters shall be considered generic and thus constitute a genus; and genera are constantly modified and shifted by specialists, the tendency being mostly to restriction of genera, with the consequent multiplication of their number, and the coinage of new generic names. A genus has no natural, much less necessary, definition, its meaning being at best a matter of expert opinion; and the same is true of the species, family, order, class, etc. A genus of the animal kingdom in the time of Linnæus and other early naturalists was a group of species approximately equivalent to a modern family, sometimes even to an order. Probably upward of 100,000 generic names of as many supposed genera have been coined or used in zoölogy; those in current use at present are estimated at about 60,000, or an average of about (rather more than) one genus for every five species in the animal kingdom. In botany the genera are less restricted and average a much larger number of species, the 9,000 phanerogamic genera, for example, including 100,000 species. The tenable name of any genus is that which has priority of publication, if it has been properly published and characterized, and is not the same as the prior name of some other genus. The names of the genus and the species together form the scientific name of an animal or a plant. In writing the technical name of any animal or plant, the generic term always precedes the specific, and begins with a capital letter: as, Musca domestica, the house-fly, where Musca is the genus, and domestica differentiates the species. Genera are often subdivided into lesser groups called subgenera. (See subgenus.) A group of genera constitutes a family or subfamily. The name of a genus as such has properly no plural. If a genus name, as for example Ada, is pluralized, as Adœ, it means, not two or more genera named Ada, but either all the species of Ada, or some supergeneric group of which Ada is the type. The former usage is loose, or somewhat cant; the latter is frequent and regular in zoölogy. A genus name is always supposed to be Latin (though its derivation is in the great majority of cases from the Greek), and its plural, if used, is in Latin form; but when it is also Anglicized an English plural is used: as, the chinchillas, the animals of the genus Chinchilla.
    • In old music, a formula or way of dividing the tetrachord. Three genera were distinguished: the diatonic, by which whole measures or “tones” were utilized; the chromatic, for which just half-steps or semitones were utilized; in addition to enharmonic, in which periods not as much as a half-step were used.
    • a general sort of something
    • (biology) taxonomic team containing several types
    • lots measuring some facet of the complexity of every of numerous manifolds or graphs
    • Within a definition, a broader group of the defined idea.
    • a course of things divided into a few subordinate types; a class more considerable than a species; a precisely defined and exactly divided course; the five predicable conceptions, or types of terms.
    • An assemblage of species, having countless fundamental points of structure in accordance, that when you look at the judgment of competent scientists, they could receive a standard substantive title. A genus is not fundamentally the lowest definable number of types, because of it may often be divided in to several subgenera. In proportion as the definition is specific, it's normal genus; if its meaning can not be clarified, its pretty much an artificial genus.
    • A kind; a sort; a course.
    • In zoology and botany, a classificatory group ranking next over the species, containing a team of species (occasionally an individual species) possessing particular architectural figures distinctive from those of every others. The value assigned to a genus is totally arbitrary—that is, it's entirely a matter of viewpoint or current use exactly what characters shall be considered generic and thus constitute a genus; and genera are constantly altered and moved by experts, the tendency becoming mostly to constraint of genera, with the consequent multiplication of these quantity, together with coinage of new common names. A genus has no normal, less required, definition, its definition staying at most readily useful a matter of expert opinion; while the exact same will additionally apply to the species, household, purchase, class, etc. A genus of pet kingdom inside period of Linnæus and other early naturalists had been several species about equivalent to a modern household, often even to an order. Most likely upward of 100,000 common brands of as much expected genera have now been coined or used in zoölogy; those in existing usage at the moment tend to be predicted at about 60,000, or an average of about (more than) one genus for each five species into the animal kingdom. In botany the genera are less limited and normal a much larger quantity of types, the 9,000 phanerogamic genera, for example, including 100,000 types. The tenable title of every genus usually that has priority of publication, if it is often precisely posted and characterized, and it is not the same as the prior name of several other genus. The names associated with the genus and the types collectively form the clinical name of an animal or a plant. On paper the technical title of any pet or plant, the general term always precedes the specific, and starts with a capital letter: since, Musca domestica, the house-fly, in which Musca could be the genus, and domestica differentiates the types. Genera are often subdivided into lower teams labeled as subgenera. (See subgenus.) Several genera comprises a family group or subfamily. The name of a genus as such has properly no plural. If a genus name, as for example Ada, is pluralized, as Adœ, this means, perhaps not two or more genera named Ada, but either all of the types of Ada, or some supergeneric number of which Ada could be the kind. The Previous consumption is free, or notably cant; the latter is regular and regular in zoölogy. A genus name is always supposed to be Latin (though its derivation is within the great greater part of instances from Greek), and its own plural, if utilized, is in Latin form; but once it is also Anglicized an English plural is used: as, the chinchillas, the creatures regarding the genus Chinchilla.
    • In old songs, a formula or way of dividing the tetrachord. Three genera had been distinguished: the diatonic, which whole actions or “tones” were utilized; the chromatic, for which just half-steps or semitones were used; and also the enharmonic, in which intervals less than a half-step were used.
    • a general kind of anything
    • (biology) taxonomic group containing more than one species
    • Biology A taxonomic group ranking below a household and above a species and usually comprising a group of species exhibiting similar characteristics. In taxonomic nomenclature the genus name's used, either alone or followed closely by a Latin adjective or epithet, to make the name of a species. See Table at taxonomy.
    • Logic A class of things divided into subordinate species having certain typical characteristics.
    • a course, group, or sort with common characteristics.
    • a rank in the classification of organisms, below household and above species; a taxon at that rank
    • a bunch with common attributes
    • several calculating some facet of the complexity of every of varied manifolds or graphs
    • Within a definition, a wider group of the defined concept.
    • a course of things divided in to several subordinate types; a class more considerable than a species; a precisely defined and exactly divided class; one of many five predicable conceptions, or types of terms.
    • An assemblage of types, having many fundamental points of construction in keeping, that in the view of competent experts, they could get a standard substantive name. A genus is certainly not necessarily the best definable selection of types, for this may frequently be split into a few subgenera. Compared as its definition is exact, it really is all-natural genus; if its definition can not be clarified, it really is just about an artificial genus.
    • a sort; a sort; a course.
    • In zoology and botany, a classificatory group ranking next over the species, containing a group of types (often just one species) having certain architectural characters distinctive from those of every other individuals. The value assigned to a genus is completely arbitrary—that is, it's totally a matter of opinion or current use exactly what characters shall be considered general and so represent a genus; and genera are constantly changed and shifted by specialists, the tendency becoming mainly to limitation of genera, aided by the consequent multiplication of these number, and coinage of new common brands. A genus has no all-natural, notably less required, definition, its meaning coming to best a matter of expert opinion; as well as the exact same will also apply to the types, family members, purchase, class, etc. A genus for the animal kingdom in time of Linnæus as well as other early naturalists had been a small grouping of species roughly equivalent to today's family, sometimes also to an order. Probably upward of 100,000 general names of as many expected genera are created or found in zoölogy; those who work in present use at the moment are predicted at about 60,000, or on average about (rather more than) one genus for almost any five types when you look at the animal kingdom. In botany the genera are less limited and typical a much larger range species, the 9,000 phanerogamic genera, for instance, including 100,000 species. The tenable name of any genus usually which includes priority of publication, if it has been correctly published and characterized, and it is not the same as the last name of another genus. The brands associated with the genus and also the types collectively form the systematic name of an animal or a plant. On paper the technical name of every animal or plant, the common term constantly precedes the particular, and starts with a capital page: as, Musca domestica, the house-fly, in which Musca is the genus, and domestica differentiates the species. Genera in many cases are subdivided into smaller teams called subgenera. (See subgenus.) Several genera comprises a household or subfamily. The name of a genus as such has properly no plural. If a genus name, in terms of instance Ada, is pluralized, as Adœ, it indicates, maybe not two or more genera named Ada, but either all of the types of Ada, or some supergeneric selection of which Ada could be the type. The Previous use is free, or notably cant; the latter is regular and regular in zoölogy. A genus name is always said to be Latin (though its derivation is in the great most of situations through the Greek), as well as its plural, if made use of, is in Latin type; however when it is also Anglicized an English plural can be used: as, the chinchillas, the animals of genus Chinchilla.
    • In old music, a formula or way of dividing the tetrachord. Three genera had been distinguished: the diatonic, by which entire measures or “tones” were used; the chromatic, by which just half-steps or semitones were utilized; together with enharmonic, where intervals lower than a half-step were utilized.
    • a broad type of anything
    • (biology) taxonomic team containing more than one species

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