galliard definition

  • noun:
    • A spirited party preferred in France when you look at the sixteenth and 17th centuries.
    • The triple-time songs for this dance.
    • A lively party, popular in 16th- and 17th-century Europe
    • The triple-time songs because of this dance
    • A spirited party well-known in France within the sixteenth and seventeenth hundreds of years.
    • A brisk, gay guy.
    • The triple-time music with this party.
    • A spirited dance popular in France into the 16th and 17th centuries.
    • A gay, lively dance. Cf. gailliarde.
    • The triple-time music because of this dance.
    • A lively party, preferred in 16th- and 17th-century European countries
    • A brisk, lively man; a gay, jaunty fellow: as, “Selden is a galliard,”
    • The triple-time songs with this party
    • A spirited party for just two dancers only, typical inside sixteenth and seventeenth hundreds of years: among the precursors for the minuet. Also called romanesca.
    • A lively dance, popular in sixteenth- and 17th-century European countries
    • The triple-time songs for this dance
    • songs written for such a-dance, or perhaps in its rhythm, which can be triple and emphatic, although not quick.
    • A brisk, homosexual guy.
    • a phrase found in north England for a sandstone or grit of especially close and consistent texture.
    • A gay, vibrant party. Cf. gailliarde.
    • A brisk, gay man.
    • A gay, lively party. Cf. gailliarde.
    • A brisk, lively man; a gay, jaunty fellow: as, “Selden is a galliard,”
    • A spirited dance for 2 performers just, typical within the sixteenth and seventeenth hundreds of years: one of the precursors associated with minuet. Also known as romanesca.
    • A brisk, lively man; a gay, jaunty fellow: as, “Selden is a galliard,”
    • A spirited party for just two dancers just, common into the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: among precursors of this minuet. Also known as romanesca.
    • songs written for such a dance, or in its rhythm, which is triple and emphatic, not rapid.
    • A term found in northern England for a sandstone or grit of specially close and uniform texture.
    • songs written for these types of a dance, or perhaps in its rhythm, that will be triple and emphatic, although not quick.
    • a phrase utilized in north The united kingdomt for a sandstone or grit of specifically close and uniform surface.
    • A spirited party preferred in France in the sixteenth and 17th centuries.
    • The triple-time songs because of this dance.
    • A lively party, preferred in sixteenth- and 17th-century European countries
    • The triple-time music with this dance
    • A brisk, homosexual guy.
    • A gay, lively party. Cf. gailliarde.
    • A brisk, lively guy; a gay, jaunty other: as, “Selden is a galliard,”
    • A spirited dance for 2 dancers just, typical into the sixteenth and seventeenth hundreds of years: the precursors for the minuet. Also called romanesca.
    • Music written for these types of a dance, or perhaps in its rhythm, that is triple and emphatic, but not fast.
    • A term utilized in north England for a sandstone or grit of particularly close and consistent surface.
  • adjective:
    • Archaic Spirited; lively; homosexual.
    • Gay; brisk; active.
    • Archaic Spirited; lively; homosexual.
    • Archaic Spirited; lively; gay.
    • Gay; quick; active.
    • Gay; quick; energetic.
    • Archaic Spirited; vibrant; gay.
    • Gay; quick; energetic.
  • others:
    • Brisk; gay; vibrant; jaunty.
    • Brisk; gay; vibrant; jaunty.
    • Brisk; homosexual; vibrant; jaunty.
    • Brisk; homosexual; vibrant; jaunty.

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