fratricelli definition

  • noun-plural:
    • title which St. Francis of Assisi offered to their followers, at the beginning of the 13th century.
    • A sect which seceded through the Franciscan Order, mainly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, maintaining the duty of celibacy and poverty, and discountenancing oaths. Known as also Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • The name which St. Francis of Assisi gave to his supporters, early in the 13th century.
    • A sect which seceded from the Franciscan Order, chiefly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, keeping the duty of celibacy and poverty, and discountenancing oaths. Known as in addition Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • title which St. Francis of Assisi gave to their followers, at the beginning of the 13th century.
    • A sect which seceded through the Franciscan purchase, chiefly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, maintaining the duty of celibacy and impoverishment, and discountenancing oaths. Called additionally Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • The name which St. Francis of Assisi gave to their supporters, early in the 13th century.
    • The name which St. Francis of Assisi provided to his supporters, at the beginning of the 13th century.
    • title which St. Francis of Assisi gave to his supporters, early in the 13th century.
    • title which St. Francis of Assisi provided to his supporters, at the beginning of the 13th century.
    • A sect which seceded through the Franciscan Order, mainly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, keeping the work of celibacy and poverty, and discountenancing oaths. Called in addition Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • A sect which seceded through the Franciscan purchase, mainly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, maintaining the job of celibacy and impoverishment, and discountenancing oaths. Known as also Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • A sect which seceded from Franciscan purchase, chiefly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, keeping the job of celibacy and impoverishment, and discountenancing oaths. Called in addition Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • title which St. Francis of Assisi offered to his followers, early in the 13th century.
    • A sect which seceded through the Franciscan Order, mainly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, keeping the job of celibacy and poverty, and discountenancing oaths. Called in addition Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • title which St. Francis of Assisi offered to his followers, at the beginning of the 13th century.
    • A sect which seceded from Franciscan Order, mainly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, maintaining the duty of celibacy and impoverishment, and discountenancing oaths. Called in addition Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • title which St. Francis of Assisi gave to his followers, early in the 13th century.
    • A sect which seceded through the Franciscan Order, mainly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, maintaining the work of celibacy and impoverishment, and discountenancing oaths. Called in addition Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
    • A sect which seceded from Franciscan purchase, mainly in Italy and Sicily, in 1294, repudiating the pope as an apostate, maintaining the work of celibacy and impoverishment, and discountenancing oaths. Known as additionally Fratricellians and Fraticelli.
  • noun:
    • the most popular designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, under the name of bad Hermits, which later defied the authority of the popes, rejected the sacraments, and presented that Christian brilliance is made up in absolute impoverishment. They certainly were severely persecuted, but proceeded as a definite sect before the fifteenth century. In Addition Fraticelli.
    • the most popular designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, in name of bad Hermits, just who later defied the authority associated with the popes, refused the sacraments, and presented that Christian excellence consists in absolute impoverishment. These people were seriously persecuted, but carried on as a definite sect before the fifteenth century. Additionally Fraticelli.
    • the most popular designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, underneath the title of bad Hermits, who afterward defied the authority of this popes, refused the sacraments, and presented that Christian brilliance is made up in absolute poverty. These were severely persecuted, but carried on as a definite sect before fifteenth century. Also Fraticelli.
    • the typical designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, under the title of bad Hermits, which afterward defied the expert of the popes, rejected the sacraments, and presented that Christian perfection consists in absolute poverty. They certainly were seriously persecuted, but carried on as a definite sect through to the fifteenth century. In Addition Fraticelli.
    • the most popular designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, in name of Poor Hermits, whom afterwards defied the expert for the popes, rejected the sacraments, and held that Christian perfection is made up in absolute impoverishment. These people were seriously persecuted, but carried on as a definite sect before the fifteenth century. Also Fraticelli.
    • the most popular designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, under the name of Poor Hermits, who afterward defied the expert associated with popes, rejected the sacraments, and presented that Christian excellence consists in absolute impoverishment. These people were severely persecuted, but continued as a distinct sect before the fifteenth century. Also Fraticelli.
    • The common designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, in title of bad Hermits, whom later defied the authority regarding the popes, refused the sacraments, and held that Christian perfection is made up in absolute poverty. These people were seriously persecuted, but continued as a distinct sect until the fifteenth century. In Addition Fraticelli.
    • the normal designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, beneath the title of Poor Hermits, which afterward defied the authority regarding the popes, rejected the sacraments, and held that Christian perfection consists in absolute impoverishment. These were severely persecuted, but carried on as a distinct sect before the fifteenth century. In Addition Fraticelli.
    • the normal designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, underneath the title of Poor Hermits, whom afterward defied the authority for the popes, refused the sacraments, and presented that Christian excellence is made up in absolute poverty. These were seriously persecuted, but proceeded as a distinct sect until the fifteenth century. Also Fraticelli.
    • the typical designation of a body of reformed Franciscans authorized by Pope Celestine V. in 1294, under the name of Poor Hermits, which afterward defied the expert associated with popes, rejected the sacraments, and held that Christian brilliance consists in absolute impoverishment. These were seriously persecuted, but proceeded as a distinct sect before the fifteenth century. Additionally Fraticelli.

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