• Definition for "fother"
  • Sentence for "fother"
  • Urban Dictionary for "fother"
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fother definition

  • noun:
    • a wagonload; lots of any kind.
    • a wagonload; a lot of every sort.
    • a vintage English measure of lead or any other metals, often containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • a vintage English way of measuring lead or other metals, often containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • a wagonload; a lot of any sort.
    • meals for pets.
    • Food for creatures.
    • a vintage English measure of lead or any other metals, usually containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • Food for animals.
    • A wagonload; a lot of every type.
    • A wagonload; a load of any type.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • See Fodder, a unit of fat.
    • A wagonload; a lot of every sort.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • A load; body weight; burden; size.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • lots; body weight; burden; mass.
    • a classic product of body weight for lead, lime, many various other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being frequently 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in England a fother is a third of a chaldron; plus United states lead-mines your message may also be utilized for a quick great deal.
    • An old product of weight for lead, lime, many various other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being frequently 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in England a fother is a third of a chaldron; plus American lead-mines the term can be utilized for a quick great deal.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • A load; fat; burden; mass.
    • An old unit of weight for lead, lime, and some other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being usually 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in England a fother is a third of a chaldron; and in American lead-mines the word is sometimes used for a short ton.
    • a wagonload; lots of every type.
    • an old English measure of lead or any other metals, generally containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • meals for pets.
    • A wagonload; a load of any sort.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • A load; fat; burden; size.
    • An old unit of weight for lead, lime, and some other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being usually 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in England a fother is a third of a chaldron; and in American lead-mines the word is sometimes used for a short ton.
    • a wagonload; lots of every sort.
    • an old English way of measuring lead or any other metals, often containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • a wagonload; a load of every kind.
    • a wagonload; a load of every type.
    • meals for animals.
    • a vintage English way of measuring lead or any other metals, typically containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • a vintage English way of measuring lead or other metals, often containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • meals for creatures.
    • meals for creatures.
    • A wagonload; lots of any sort.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • A wagonload; lots of every kind.
    • A wagonload; a lot of any sort.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • See Fodder, a unit of fat.
    • See Fodder, a unit of fat.
    • a wagonload; a lot of every kind.
    • an old English way of measuring lead or other metals, typically containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • lots; fat; burden; mass.
    • a classic device of body weight for lead, lime, many other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead differs from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being typically 120 weight avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in England a fother is a 3rd of a chaldron; as well as in American lead-mines the word can be useful for a short great deal.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • meals for pets.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • a lot; fat; burden; mass.
    • lots; weight; burden; size.
    • a vintage device of fat for lead, lime, and some various other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight becoming frequently 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in The united kingdomt a fother is a third of a chaldron; and in American lead-mines the phrase can be employed for a quick great deal.
    • a vintage product of weight for lead, lime, plus some various other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight becoming generally 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in The united kingdomt a fother is a third of a chaldron; plus American lead-mines your message might be utilized for a quick great deal.
    • A wagonload; lots of any type.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • a wagonload; a lot of every type.
    • a wagonload; lots of any kind.
    • a wagonload; a load of every kind.
    • an old English measure of lead or other metals, generally containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • an old English way of measuring lead or other metals, typically containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • Food for pets.
    • meals for creatures.
    • A wagonload; a load of any type.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • A load; fat; burden; size.
    • a wagonload; a lot of any kind.
    • a classic English way of measuring lead or other metals, usually containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • Food for animals.
    • A wagonload; a load of any type.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • An old unit of weight for lead, lime, and some other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being usually 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in England a fother is a third of a chaldron; and in American lead-mines the word is sometimes used for a short ton.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • a lot; fat; burden; mass.
    • a vintage product of weight for lead, lime, many other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead differs from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being frequently 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in The united kingdomt a fother is a third of a chaldron; as well as in United states lead-mines the phrase can be used for a quick great deal.
    • a wagonload; a load of every sort.
    • a wagonload; a load of any kind.
    • a vintage English measure of lead or other metals, usually containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • a vintage English way of measuring lead or other metals, frequently containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • an old English measure of lead or other metals, frequently containing 19.5 hundredweight; a fodder.
    • lots; fat; burden; size.
    • Food for creatures.
    • Food for animals.
    • Food for animals.
    • a classic product of fat for lead, lime, and some other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being frequently 120 weight avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in The united kingdomt a fother is a third of a chaldron; plus United states lead-mines the word might be used for a brief great deal.
    • A wagonload; lots of any kind.
    • See Fodder, a unit of weight.
    • A wagonload; a load of any sort.
    • A wagonload; lots of any sort.
    • A wagonload; lots of every type.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • See Fodder, a unit of body weight.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • a lot; body weight; burden; mass.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • a vintage unit of body weight for lead, lime, many various other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being usually 120 weight avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in England a fother is a 3rd of a chaldron; and in United states lead-mines the phrase can be utilized for a quick great deal.
    • A load; fat; burden; mass.
    • a lot; body weight; burden; size.
    • a vintage unit of fat for lead, lime, many various other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead differs from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being often 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in The united kingdomt a fother is a third of a chaldron; plus in American lead-mines your message is sometimes useful for a quick great deal.
    • A wagon-load; a cart-load.
    • An old unit of weight for lead, lime, and some other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead varies from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight being usually 120 pounds avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in England a fother is a third of a chaldron; and in American lead-mines the word is sometimes used for a short ton.
    • lots; weight; burden; size.
    • a vintage unit of weight for lead, lime, many other substances; a two-horse cart-load. A fother of lead differs from 19 1/2 to 22 1/2 hundredweight, each hundredweight becoming typically 120 weight avoirdupois. At Néwcastle in The united kingdomt a fother is a third of a chaldron; as well as in United states lead-mines the word can be useful for a brief ton.
  • verb:
    • To feed pets (with fother).
    • To give creatures (with fother).
    • to get rid of a leak with oakum or old rope (usually by drawing a sail underneath the hull).
    • to end a leak with oakum or old rope (frequently by attracting a sail under the hull).
    • To feed pets (with fother).
    • To stop a leak with oakum or old rope (often by attracting a sail under the hull).
    • To give animals (with fother).
    • to avoid a leak with oakum or old rope (frequently by drawing a sail under the hull).
    • To feed animals (with fother).
    • to quit a leak with oakum or old rope (frequently by drawing a sail underneath the hull).
    • To feed creatures (with fother).
    • To feed pets (with fother).
    • to get rid of a leak with oakum or old rope (often by attracting a sail underneath the hull).
    • to quit a leak with oakum or old rope (frequently by attracting a sail beneath the hull).
    • To give pets (with fother).
    • to avoid a leak with oakum or old line (usually by drawing a sail in hull).
    • To feed creatures (with fother).
    • to cease a leak with oakum or old line (frequently by drawing a sail beneath the hull).
    • To feed animals (with fother).
    • to prevent a leak with oakum or old line (often by attracting a sail underneath the hull).
    • To feed animals (with fother).
    • to end a leak with oakum or old rope (usually by attracting a sail under the hull).
    • To feed pets (with fother).
    • To give creatures (with fother).
    • To give creatures (with fother).
    • to end a leak with oakum or old line (often by drawing a sail under the hull).
    • to avoid a leak with oakum or old line (frequently by attracting a sail beneath the hull).
    • to end a leak with oakum or old line (usually by drawing a sail underneath the hull).
  • verb-transitive:
    • to avoid (a leak in a ship at sea) by attracting under its base a thrummed sail, so that the pressure of the water may force it into the crack.
    • to avoid (a leak in a ship at ocean) by drawing under its base a thrummed sail, so your force associated with liquid may force it to the crack.
    • to avoid (a leak in a ship at ocean) by drawing under its base a thrummed sail, so the force of this liquid may force it in to the crack.
    • To stop (a leak in a ship at ocean) by drawing under its base a thrummed sail, so the pressure of liquid may force it to the break.
    • to get rid of (a leak in a ship at ocean) by drawing under its bottom a thrummed sail, so the pressure of liquid may force it into the crack.
    • To stop (a leak in a ship at water) by drawing under its base a thrummed sail, so that the force of the liquid may force it in to the break.
    • To stop (a leak in a ship at sea) by drawing under its base a thrummed sail, so your force associated with liquid may force it into the break.
    • to avoid (a leak in a ship at ocean) by drawing under its base a thrummed sail, so that the force associated with the liquid may force it into the crack.
    • to get rid of (a leak in a ship at sea) by attracting under its bottom a thrummed sail, so the pressure associated with water may force it in to the break.
    • to cease (a leak in a ship at ocean) by attracting under its base a thrummed sail, so your stress of this water may force it in to the break.
    • to quit (a leak in a ship at ocean) by attracting under its base a thrummed sail, so your pressure associated with the water may force it into the break.
    • to prevent (a leak in a ship at water) by drawing under its bottom a thrummed sail, so the force of water may force it to the crack.
    • to quit (a leak in a ship at ocean) by attracting under its base a thrummed sail, so the stress of this water may force it in to the break.
    • to prevent (a leak in a ship at ocean) by drawing under its bottom a thrummed sail, so that the force of the water may force it in to the break.
  • others:
    • to put a sail or tarpaulin more than, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the true purpose of maintaining water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., are thickly stitched in the sail or tarpaulin.
    • to position a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the purpose of keeping water out. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched from the sail or tarpaulin.
    • to position a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the purpose of keeping the water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., are thickly stitched on the sail or tarpaulin.
    • to position a sail or tarpaulin more than, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the true purpose of maintaining water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched regarding the sail or tarpaulin.
    • to put a sail or tarpaulin more than, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the purpose of keeping water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched regarding the sail or tarpaulin.
    • To place a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the purpose of maintaining water out. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched on sail or tarpaulin.
    • To place a sail or tarpaulin more than, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the intended purpose of maintaining water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched on sail or tarpaulin.
    • to put a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the purpose of keeping the water out. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched regarding sail or tarpaulin.
    • to put a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the intended purpose of maintaining water out. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., are thickly stitched from the sail or tarpaulin.
    • To place a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the purpose of keeping water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched regarding sail or tarpaulin.
    • to put a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the true purpose of maintaining the water out. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., are thickly stitched regarding the sail or tarpaulin.
    • to position a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the purpose of keeping water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., are thickly stitched in the sail or tarpaulin.
    • to position a sail or tarpaulin over, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the intended purpose of keeping water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched on sail or tarpaulin.
    • to position a sail or tarpaulin more than, as a leak in a ship's hull, for the intended purpose of keeping the water away. In fathering a leak, rope-yarns, oakum, etc., tend to be thickly stitched regarding the sail or tarpaulin.
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