formalism definition

  • noun:
    • thorough or extortionate adherence to recognized forms, such as faith or art.
    • An instance of rigorous or exorbitant adherence to recognized forms.
    • A method of aesthetic evaluation that emphasizes architectural elements and creative practices instead of content, especially in literary works.
    • Strict adherence to a given type of conduct, training an such like.
    • one of many alternate computational paradigms for certain concept.
    • a procedure for explanation and/or assessment centered on the (usually linguistic) framework of a literary work as opposed to regarding the contexts of their origin or reception.
    • The tendency to elevate formal above expressive value in music, as with serialism.
    • A particular mathematical or systematic principle or description of a given condition or effect.
    • The training or perhaps the doctrine of rigid adherence to, or reliance on, external forms, esp. in issues of religion.
    • thorough or exorbitant adherence to recognized types, as with religion or art.
    • an example of thorough or extortionate adherence to recognized forms.
    • a way of visual analysis that emphasizes structural elements and artistic practices in the place of content, particularly in literary works.
    • Strict adherence to a given form of conduct, rehearse an such like.
    • the smoothness to be formal; strict adherence to or observance of recommended or recognized type, rule, design, etiquette, or even the love; extortionate attachment to old-fashioned use, or (especially in religion) to external kinds and observances; for this reason, artificiality or cold tightness of way or behavior: as, judicial formalism; formalism in art; the formalism of pedantry or of court life; cold formalism in public places worship.
    • one of many alternate computational paradigms for a given concept.
    • In philos.: The system which denies the existence of matter and recognizes form only; remarkable idealism.
    • An approach to interpretation and/or assessment centered on the (usually linguistic) construction of a literary work in place of regarding the contexts of its source or reception.
    • A belief in sufficiency of formal reasoning, specially regarding the conventional syllogistic, the reasons of peoples thought.
    • The habit of raise formal above expressive worth in music, as with serialism.
    • (philosophy) the philosophical theory that formal (reasonable or mathematical) statements haven't any meaning but that its symbols (thought to be physical entities) exhibit a form which has of good use programs
    • the doctrine that formal structure as opposed to content is what is represented
    • the training of scrupulous adherence to prescribed or additional types
    • a specific mathematical or medical concept or information of certain condition or result.
    • The practice and/or doctrine of rigid adherence to, or reliance on, additional types, esp. in issues of faith.
    • the smoothness to be formal; strict adherence to or observance of prescribed or acknowledged type, rule, style, etiquette, and/or want; exorbitant attachment to old-fashioned consumption, or (especially in faith) to external forms and observances; for this reason, artificiality or cold stiffness of way or behavior: as, judicial formalism; formalism in art; the formalism of pedantry or of court life; cold formalism in public areas worship.
    • In philos.: The device which denies the presence of matter and recognizes form only; remarkable idealism.
    • A belief in sufficiency of formal reasoning, specially associated with old-fashioned syllogistic, for the functions of human idea.
    • (philosophy) the philosophical principle that formal (logical or mathematical) statements don't have any definition but that its symbols (regarded as real organizations) display a form that features helpful programs
    • the doctrine that formal framework instead of content is really what should always be represented
    • the rehearse of scrupulous adherence to recommended or outside forms
    • thorough or exorbitant adherence to recognized kinds, such as faith or art.
    • An instance of thorough or exorbitant adherence to recognized kinds.
    • an approach of aesthetic evaluation that emphasizes structural elements and creative techniques as opposed to content, especially in literary works.
    • Strict adherence to confirmed kind of conduct, practice an such like.
    • one of many alternate computational paradigms for a given principle.
    • a procedure for explanation and/or assessment dedicated to the (usually linguistic) construction of a literary work as opposed to in the contexts of its beginning or reception.
    • The habit of raise formal above expressive price in music, like in serialism.
    • A particular mathematical or scientific concept or description of certain condition or impact.
    • The practice or perhaps the doctrine of rigid adherence to, or reliance upon, exterior kinds, esp. in issues of religion.
    • the type to be formal; rigid adherence to or observance of prescribed or recognized form, guideline, design, etiquette, and/or love; exorbitant accessory to standard use, or (especially in faith) to exterior types and observances; thus, artificiality or cold rigidity of way or behavior: as, judicial formalism; formalism in art; the formalism of pedantry or of judge life; cold formalism in public worship.
    • In philos.: The device which denies the existence of matter and recognizes form only; remarkable idealism.
    • A belief in the sufficiency of formal logic, specially of the traditional syllogistic, when it comes to functions of personal idea.
    • (philosophy) the philosophical theory that formal (rational or mathematical) statements haven't any meaning but that its symbols (viewed as physical organizations) show a questionnaire that useful applications
    • the doctrine that formal construction without content is really what should be represented
    • the practice of scrupulous adherence to recommended or exterior kinds

Related Sources

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