fool definition

  • noun:
    • one that is deficient in wisdom, feeling, or comprehension.
    • person who functions unwisely on a given occasion: I became a fool to possess quit my task.
    • a person who is deficient in judgment, sense, or comprehension.
    • a person who was tricked or meant to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of myself by pretending I had won.
    • a person who functions unwisely on a given occasion: I became a fool to possess quit my job.
    • Informal A person with a talent or enthusiasm for a certain task: a dancing trick; a fool for snowboarding.
    • one that happens to be tricked or built to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of myself by pretending I'd obtained.
    • A member of a royal or noble family who provided enjoyment, just like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • casual people with a talent or passion for a particular task: a dancing fool; a fool for skiing.
    • a person who subverts meeting or orthodoxy or differs from social conformity so that you can expose spiritual or ethical truth: a holy fool.
    • a part of a royal or noble family which supplied enjoyment, just like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • A dessert made from stewed or puréed good fresh fruit blended with ointment or custard and served cool.
    • one that subverts convention or orthodoxy or varies from social conformity so that you can expose religious or moral truth: a holy fool.
    • person who is lacking in view, good sense, or understanding.
    • Archaic A mentally lacking person; an idiot.
    • A dessert made from stewed or puréed fruit combined with ointment or custard and served cool.
    • a person who acts unwisely on a given occasion: I happened to be a fool to have quit my work.
    • a person who has-been tricked or made to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of myself by pretending I experienced claimed.
    • casual an individual with a talent or enthusiasm for a specific task: a dancing fool; a fool for skiing.
    • an associate of a royal or noble household whom supplied activity, much like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • One who subverts convention or orthodoxy or varies from social conformity in order to unveil religious or moral truth: a holy fool.
    • A dessert made of stewed or puréed fruit mixed with lotion or custard and served cool.
    • Archaic A mentally lacking individual; an idiot.
    • Archaic A mentally lacking person; an idiot.
    • people with poor view or little cleverness.
    • A jester; you whose part was to captivate a sovereign and also the courtroom (or lower personages).
    • A person with poor wisdom or small intelligence.
    • an individual who really likes something specified.
    • a kind of dessert made of puréed fruit and custard or ointment.
    • A jester; people whoever role was to captivate a sovereign plus the courtroom (or lower personages).
    • somebody who quite definitely likes one thing specified.
    • A type of dessert made of puréed fruit and custard or cream.
    • one with poor wisdom or small intelligence.
    • a certain card in a tarot deck.
    • A jester; someone whose role was to amuse a sovereign and also the courtroom (or lower personages).
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly called gooseberry fool.
    • an individual who really likes some thing specified.
    • One destitute of explanation, or for the common powers of comprehension; an idiot; an all natural.
    • a kind of dessert made of puréed fruit and custard or ointment.
    • people lacking in intellect; one that functions absurdly, or pursues a program unlike the dictates of wisdom; one without wisdom; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • a certain card in a tarot deck.
    • person who functions unlike moral and religious wisdom; a wicked person.
    • one that counterfeits folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer previously kept to make sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly called gooseberry trick.
    • A particular card in a tarot deck.
    • One who is lacking in view, good sense, or understanding.
    • One destitute of reason, or of this common abilities of understanding; an idiot; a natural.
    • one that is lacking in wisdom, sense, or comprehension.
    • a person who acts unwisely on a given event: I was a fool to have quit my task.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly known as gooseberry fool.
    • one that functions unwisely on confirmed celebration: I was a fool to have quit my task.
    • person who was tricked or meant to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of me personally by pretending I had claimed.
    • one that was tricked or made to appear absurd; a dupe: They made a fool of myself by pretending I had obtained.
    • person who is deficient in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • casual one with a talent or passion for a specific task: a dancing fool; a fool for snowboarding.
    • One destitute of reason, or regarding the common capabilities of comprehension; an idiot; a normal.
    • a person who is deficient in view or good sense; a silly or stupid individual; person who manifests either habitual or periodic lack of discernment or commonsense: chiefly utilized as a term of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • Informal one with a talent or passion for a certain task: a dancing trick; a fool for skiing.
    • A member of a royal or noble household whom offered entertainment, much like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • a part of a royal or noble home just who provided enjoyment, as with jokes or antics; a jester.
    • a person who counterfeits psychological weakness or folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed cap and bells on his mind, and a mock scepter or bauble in his hand, previously kept by people of rank in serach engines for the objective of making sport. See bauble.
    • a person who subverts meeting or orthodoxy or varies from social conformity to be able to reveal spiritual or ethical truth: a holy trick.
    • A dessert made of stewed or puréed fruit mixed with cream or custard and served cold.
    • Figuratively, an instrument, doll, sport, butt, or target: as, become the fool of situations.
    • One who subverts convention or orthodoxy or differs from personal conformity being reveal spiritual or moral truth: a holy fool.
    • Archaic A mentally deficient person; an idiot.
    • A wanton, bad, or sinful person.
    • A dessert made from stewed or puréed fresh fruit blended with lotion or custard and served cold.
    • A conical paper cap which dunces at school are occasionally compelled to wear through discipline.
    • Archaic A mentally lacking person; an idiot.
    • you deficient in intellect; one that functions absurdly, or pursues a course despite the dictates of wisdom; one without view; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • people lacking in intellect; person who acts absurdly, or pursues a training course despite the dictates of wisdom; one without view; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • To act like one void of understanding.
    • a person who is deficient in view, feeling, or comprehension.
    • one that functions despite ethical and religious knowledge; a wicked individual.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • One who acts as opposed to ethical and religious wisdom; a wicked person.
    • person who counterfeits folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly held which will make sport, clothed fantastically in motley, with absurd accouterments.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • a person who counterfeits folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer previously held in order to make recreation, dressed fantastically in motley, with absurd accouterments.
    • person who functions unwisely on a given occasion: I became a fool to own quit my work.
    • a person who has been tricked or meant to appear absurd; a dupe: They made a fool of me personally by pretending I'd claimed.
    • a person who is deficient in wisdom, sense, or comprehension.
    • one that is deficient in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic person.
    • casual an individual with a talent or enthusiasm for a specific activity: a dancing trick; a fool for skiing.
    • One who is lacking in judgment or sense; a silly or stupid individual; one who manifests either habitual or periodic insufficient discernment or wise practice: mainly used as a phrase of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • One who acts unwisely on confirmed event: I happened to be a fool to have quit my job.
    • person who happens to be tricked or designed to appear absurd; a dupe: They made a fool of me personally by pretending I'd won.
    • A light paste of flour and water, like pie-crust.
    • Informal A person with a talent or passion for a certain activity: a dancing trick; a fool for snowboarding.
    • sort of custard; a dish made of fruit crushed and scalded or stewed and mixed with whipped ointment and sugar: as, gooseberry fool.
    • an associate of a royal or noble family which supplied entertainment, just like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • one that subverts meeting or orthodoxy or differs from social conformity being unveil spiritual or moral truth: a holy fool.
    • A dessert made from stewed or puréed good fresh fruit combined with lotion or custard and served cold.
    • a person who lacks great wisdom
    • Archaic A mentally deficient person; an idiot.
    • people with poor view or little cleverness.
    • a specialist clown employed to amuse a king or nobleman in the Middle years
    • somebody who is gullible and easy to make use of
    • an associate of a royal or noble family just who provided activity, much like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • One who subverts meeting or orthodoxy or differs from social conformity in order to reveal religious or ethical truth: a holy trick.
    • A dessert made of stewed or puréed fruit mixed with cream or custard and served cold.
    • Archaic A mentally deficient individual; an idiot.
    • one that is lacking in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic person.
    • one that is deficient in view, sense, or understanding.
    • person who counterfeits emotional weakness or folly; a specialist jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on his mind, and a mock scepter or bauble in his hand, previously held by persons of rank in serach engines for the goal of making sport. See bauble.
    • Figuratively, a tool, model, sport, butt, or victim: as, become the trick of circumstances.
    • A jester; you whoever role was to amuse a sovereign while the courtroom (or lower personages).
    • a person who is deficient in judgment, good sense, or comprehension.
    • one that is deficient in view or feeling; a silly or stupid person; person who exhibits either habitual or periodic decreased discernment or good judgment: mainly utilized as a term of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • person who functions unwisely on confirmed occasion: I happened to be a fool having quit my job.
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked person.
    • One who acts unwisely on confirmed event: I was a fool having quit my work.
    • One who counterfeits emotional weakness or folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed up in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on his mind, and a mock scepter or bauble in the hand, formerly held by people of rank in te se's for the goal of making recreation. See bauble.
    • Someone who quite definitely likes anything specified.
    • people with bad view or little cleverness.
    • One who happens to be tricked or made to appear absurd; a dupe: They made a fool of me personally by pretending I experienced obtained.
    • Figuratively, a tool, model, recreation, butt, or prey: as, is the trick of situations.
    • a person who has been tricked or meant to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of me by pretending I had won.
    • people with poor judgment or small cleverness.
    • A conical report cap which dunces in school are occasionally compelled to wear by means of discipline.
    • a kind of dessert made of puréed fruit and custard or ointment.
    • casual A person with a talent or enthusiasm for a certain task: a dancing trick; a fool for skiing.
    • A jester; an individual whoever role would be to entertain a sovereign and judge (or lower personages).
    • A wanton, bad, or sinful person.
    • casual A person with a talent or passion for a certain activity: a dancing fool; a fool for snowboarding.
    • A jester; a person whoever part would be to entertain a sovereign while the court (or reduced personages).
    • To act like one void of understanding.
    • A particular card in a tarot deck.
    • a person who truly likes anything specified.
    • A member of a royal or noble household just who provided enjoyment, just like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • A conical paper cap which dunces in school are now and again compelled to put on by way of punishment.
    • an associate of a royal or noble household whom supplied enjoyment, just like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • Someone who very much likes something specified.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • person who subverts meeting or orthodoxy or differs from personal conformity in order to reveal spiritual or moral truth: a holy fool.
    • a kind of dessert made from puréed fruit and custard or lotion.
    • to behave like one void of understanding.
    • one that subverts meeting or orthodoxy or differs from social conformity to be able to reveal religious or moral truth: a holy fool.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with lotion; -- commonly known as gooseberry fool.
    • person who is lacking in judgment, sense, or comprehension.
    • a kind of dessert made from puréed fresh fruit and custard or ointment.
    • A dessert made from stewed or puréed good fresh fruit combined with ointment or custard and served cool.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • one that is deficient in wisdom, good sense, or comprehension.
    • A particular card in a tarot deck.
    • A dessert made from stewed or puréed fresh fruit mixed with ointment or custard and served cool.
    • a specific card in a tarot deck.
    • One destitute of explanation, or associated with the common abilities of understanding; an idiot; a natural.
    • person who acts unwisely on certain occasion: I happened to be a fool to possess quit my job.
    • One who functions unwisely on a given celebration: I happened to be a fool to have quit my job.
    • Archaic A mentally deficient person; an idiot.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • Archaic A mentally deficient individual; an idiot.
    • someone deficient in intellect; a person who acts absurdly, or pursues a program as opposed to the dictates of wisdom; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • a person who is tricked or designed to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of me by pretending I'd claimed.
    • One who has-been tricked or meant to appear absurd; a dupe: They made a fool of myself by pretending I experienced won.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and broken, with lotion; -- frequently known as gooseberry trick.
    • Informal people with a talent or enthusiasm for a specific activity: a dancing trick; a fool for snowboarding.
    • one that functions despite ethical and spiritual knowledge; a wicked individual.
    • One destitute of reason, or of this common powers of understanding; an idiot; an all-natural.
    • A member of a royal or noble family whom supplied entertainment, much like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • a person who counterfeits folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly held to make recreation, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.
    • someone lacking in intellect; one that acts absurdly, or pursues a program unlike the dictates of wisdom; one without view; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • a person who subverts convention or orthodoxy or differs from social conformity being reveal religious or moral truth: a holy trick.
    • casual people with a talent or enthusiasm for a specific activity: a dancing fool; a fool for skiing.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and broken, with ointment; -- frequently known as gooseberry trick.
    • One who is lacking in wisdom, good sense, or comprehension.
    • one that is deficient in wisdom, feeling, or understanding.
    • A member of a royal or noble household who provided entertainment, as with jokes or antics; a jester.
    • one that functions contrary to ethical and religious wisdom; a wicked individual.
    • A dessert manufactured from stewed or puréed fruit blended with cream or custard and served cold.
    • One destitute of reason, or of typical capabilities of comprehension; an idiot; an all natural.
    • person who acts unwisely on certain event: I became a fool having quit my job.
    • person who functions unwisely on confirmed occasion: I was a fool to possess quit my job.
    • Archaic A mentally lacking person; an idiot.
    • one that counterfeits folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer previously held to create sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with absurd accouterments.
    • one that subverts meeting or orthodoxy or varies from social conformity so that you can expose spiritual or ethical truth: a holy fool.
    • one that happens to be tricked or meant to appear absurd; a dupe: They made a fool of myself by pretending I had won.
    • person who has-been tricked or meant to appear ridiculous; a dupe: They made a fool of me by pretending I experienced claimed.
    • A person deficient in intellect; one who functions absurdly, or pursues a training course unlike the dictates of wisdom; one without wisdom; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • A dessert made of stewed or puréed fruit combined with lotion or custard and served cold.
    • A light paste of flour and water, like pie-crust.
    • A light paste of flour and liquid, like pie-crust.
    • Informal A person with a talent or enthusiasm for a certain activity: a dancing trick; a fool for skiing.
    • Archaic A mentally deficient individual; an idiot.
    • A sort of custard; a dish manufactured from good fresh fruit crushed and scalded or stewed and mixed with whipped ointment and sugar: as, gooseberry trick.
    • person who acts contrary to ethical and spiritual knowledge; a wicked person.
    • casual one with a talent or passion for a certain task: a dancing trick; a fool for snowboarding.
    • A sort of custard; a dish made from fruit crushed and scalded or stewed and combined with whipped cream and sugar: as, gooseberry trick.
    • One who counterfeits folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly held in order to make recreation, dressed fantastically in motley, with absurd accouterments.
    • an associate of a royal or noble household just who offered activity, as with jokes or antics; a jester.
    • A member of a royal or noble household whom supplied enjoyment, much like jokes or antics; a jester.
    • person who subverts convention or orthodoxy or varies from personal conformity so that you can unveil religious or ethical truth: a holy fool.
    • One who subverts convention or orthodoxy or varies from personal conformity so that you can reveal spiritual or moral truth: a holy fool.
    • one that is lacking in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • One who is lacking in wisdom or good sense; a silly or stupid individual; a person who exhibits either habitual or occasional not enough discernment or commonsense: chiefly used as a term of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • A dessert made from stewed or puréed fresh fruit combined with ointment or custard and served cool.
    • a person who does not have great judgment
    • A dessert manufactured from stewed or puréed good fresh fruit combined with lotion or custard and served cool.
    • one that counterfeits psychological weakness or folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on his head, and a mock scepter or bauble in his hand, previously kept by individuals of rank for the objective of making recreation. See bauble.
    • one that is deficient in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic person.
    • Archaic A mentally deficient individual; an idiot.
    • somebody who lacks great wisdom
    • Archaic A mentally lacking person; an idiot.
    • one with bad judgment or little cleverness.
    • One who is lacking in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • a specialist clown employed to captivate a king or nobleman in the Middle years
    • one that is lacking in judgment or feeling; a silly or stupid individual; a person who exhibits either habitual or occasional insufficient discernment or commonsense: chiefly made use of as a phrase of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • Figuratively, a tool, toy, sport, butt, or sufferer: as, to be the trick of situations.
    • One who is lacking in judgment or feeling; a silly or stupid individual; one that exhibits either habitual or periodic insufficient discernment or good judgment: chiefly utilized as a term of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • A jester; one whoever part was to host a sovereign as well as the courtroom (or reduced personages).
    • an expert clown used to captivate a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
    • person who counterfeits psychological weakness or folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed cap and bells on his head, and a mock scepter or bauble in his hand, formerly kept by people of rank in te se's for the purpose of making sport. See bauble.
    • a person who counterfeits mental weakness or folly; a specialist jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on his mind, and a mock scepter or bauble in the hand, formerly kept by individuals of rank in te se's for the objective of making sport. See bauble.
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked individual.
    • a person who very much likes something specified.
    • A conical report cap which dunces in school are occasionally compelled to wear by way of discipline.
    • Figuratively, a tool, doll, recreation, butt, or prey: as, is the fool of situations.
    • A type of dessert manufactured from puréed good fresh fruit and custard or cream.
    • someone who is gullible and simple to make use of
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked person.
    • Figuratively, something, doll, sport, butt, or target: as, is the fool of circumstances.
    • To act like one void of understanding.
    • somebody who is gullible and simple to benefit from
    • a certain card in a tarot deck.
    • people with bad wisdom or little intelligence.
    • A conical paper limit which dunces at school are sometimes compelled to put on through punishment.
    • A jester; someone whoever part was to amuse a sovereign together with court (or reduced personages).
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked individual.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • to do something like one void of understanding.
    • somebody who very much likes anything specified.
    • someone with bad judgment or small cleverness.
    • A conical report limit which dunces at school are occasionally compelled to put on by way of discipline.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with lotion; -- generally known as gooseberry fool.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • A jester; one whose part would be to captivate a sovereign and also the courtroom (or lower personages).
    • a form of dessert made from puréed fruit and custard or lotion.
    • One destitute of reason, or associated with the typical abilities of comprehension; an idiot; an all-natural.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • one lacking in intellect; person who acts absurdly, or pursues a training course as opposed to the dictates of wisdom; one without wisdom; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • somebody who greatly likes some thing specified.
    • a form of dessert made of puréed fresh fruit and custard or ointment.
    • one that acts unlike ethical and spiritual knowledge; a wicked person.
    • a specific card in a tarot deck.
    • person who counterfeits folly; a specialist jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly kept in order to make recreation, clothed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.
    • to do something like one void of understanding.
    • a certain card in a tarot deck.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and broken, with lotion; -- generally known as gooseberry trick.
    • One destitute of reason, or associated with the typical capabilities of comprehension; an idiot; a normal.
    • A light paste of flour and liquid, like pie-crust.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • people lacking in intellect; person who functions absurdly, or pursues a course unlike the dictates of knowledge; one without view; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • A person with bad view or small intelligence.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • a person who functions unlike ethical and religious knowledge; a wicked individual.
    • sort of custard; a dish made of good fresh fruit broken and scalded or stewed and blended with whipped ointment and sugar: as, gooseberry fool.
    • one with poor view or small cleverness.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with lotion; -- frequently called gooseberry fool.
    • A jester; a person whoever role was to amuse a sovereign and also the judge (or reduced personages).
    • A light paste of flour and liquid, like pie-crust.
    • One who counterfeits folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer previously kept in order to make sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.
    • One destitute of explanation, or for the common abilities of understanding; an idiot; a normal.
    • A jester; someone whose role was to captivate a sovereign plus the courtroom (or lower personages).
    • A person lacking in intellect; one that acts absurdly, or pursues a program contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without view; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • somebody who truly likes something specified.
    • A sort of custard; a dish manufactured from good fresh fruit crushed and scalded or stewed and blended with whipped cream and sugar: as, gooseberry trick.
    • Someone who quite definitely likes something specified.
    • an individual with bad judgment or small cleverness.
    • a person who acts unlike moral and religious wisdom; a wicked individual.
    • someone who lacks great view
    • a kind of dessert made of puréed good fresh fruit and custard or cream.
    • A type of dessert manufactured from puréed good fresh fruit and custard or ointment.
    • A particular card in a tarot deck.
    • A jester; a person whoever role was to amuse a sovereign as well as the court (or reduced personages).
    • one with bad wisdom or small cleverness.
    • A particular card in a tarot deck.
    • One who counterfeits folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer previously held to produce sport, dressed fantastically in motley, with absurd accouterments.
    • A jester; people whose role was to amuse a sovereign and the courtroom (or reduced personages).
    • one that is lacking in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • Someone who quite definitely likes some thing specified.
    • a specialist clown used to amuse a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
    • an individual who does not have great judgment
    • A light paste of flour and liquid, like pie-crust.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and broken, with cream; -- generally called gooseberry trick.
    • one that is deficient in wisdom or feeling; a silly or stupid person; one who exhibits either habitual or periodic decreased discernment or commonsense: mainly made use of as a phrase of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- commonly known as gooseberry trick.
    • a form of dessert made of puréed good fresh fruit and custard or ointment.
    • a person who really likes anything specified.
    • a person who is deficient in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • someone who is gullible and simple to take advantage of
    • a certain card in a tarot deck.
    • One destitute of explanation, or of common capabilities of understanding; an idiot; an all-natural.
    • One destitute of reason, or associated with typical capabilities of comprehension; an idiot; an all natural.
    • One who counterfeits mental weakness or folly; a specialist jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on their head, and a mock scepter or bauble in his hand, previously kept by people of rank in te se's for the objective of making sport. See bauble.
    • sort of custard; a dish made of fruit broken and scalded or stewed and mixed with whipped ointment and sugar: as, gooseberry fool.
    • person who is lacking in judgment or feeling; a silly or stupid person; a person who manifests either habitual or occasional lack of discernment or common sense: chiefly utilized as a phrase of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • a professional clown utilized to entertain a king or nobleman in the centre Ages
    • A person deficient in intellect; one who acts absurdly, or pursues a program contrary to the dictates of knowledge; one without wisdom; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • a kind of dessert made of puréed fresh fruit and custard or ointment.
    • an individual deficient in intellect; one who functions absurdly, or pursues a course contrary to the dictates of knowledge; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • Figuratively, something, model, recreation, butt, or victim: as, becoming the trick of circumstances.
    • one that is deficient in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • One who acts despite ethical and spiritual knowledge; a wicked individual.
    • One who counterfeits mental weakness or folly; a specialist jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed up in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on his head, and a mock scepter or bauble inside the hand, previously held by persons of rank for the goal of making sport. See bauble.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and crushed, with cream; -- frequently called gooseberry trick.
    • a certain card in a tarot deck.
    • one that functions unlike ethical and spiritual knowledge; a wicked person.
    • Figuratively, an instrument, toy, sport, butt, or sufferer: as, becoming the fool of situations.
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked individual.
    • a person who is deficient in wisdom or sense; a silly or stupid individual; one that exhibits either habitual or periodic decreased discernment or commonsense: chiefly used as a term of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • person who counterfeits folly; a specialist jester or buffoon; a retainer previously held to create recreation, dressed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.
    • somebody who is gullible and easy to benefit from
    • One who counterfeits folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer previously held to produce sport, clothed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.
    • One destitute of reason, or regarding the typical capabilities of comprehension; an idiot; a natural.
    • A conical report limit which dunces in school are often compelled to wear by means of punishment.
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked individual.
    • an individual who lacks great wisdom
    • One who counterfeits emotional weakness or folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on his mind, and a mock scepter or bauble inside the hand, previously held by people of rank for the purpose of making recreation. See bauble.
    • A compound of gooseberries scalded and broken, with lotion; -- generally known as gooseberry fool.
    • A conical paper limit which dunces at school are now and again compelled to wear by means of punishment.
    • To act like one void of comprehension.
    • One destitute of reason, or of this typical powers of understanding; an idiot; a normal.
    • Figuratively, an instrument, doll, recreation, butt, or prey: as, to be the fool of conditions.
    • an individual lacking in intellect; a person who functions absurdly, or pursues a training course contrary to the dictates of wisdom; one without view; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • an individual lacking in intellect; person who acts absurdly, or pursues a program unlike the dictates of knowledge; one without judgment; a simpleton; a dolt.
    • A wanton, bad, or sinful person.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • To act like one void of comprehension.
    • a specialist clown utilized to entertain a king or nobleman in the centre Ages
    • one that functions despite ethical and religious knowledge; a wicked person.
    • person who functions contrary to moral and religious wisdom; a wicked person.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • A conical paper cap which dunces in school are sometimes compelled to put on through discipline.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • one that counterfeits folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly held in order to make recreation, dressed fantastically in motley, with absurd accouterments.
    • One who is lacking in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • a person who is deficient in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • person who counterfeits folly; a specialist jester or buffoon; a retainer formerly kept to make recreation, clothed fantastically in motley, with ridiculous accouterments.
    • to behave like one void of comprehension.
    • one that is deficient in judgment or sense; a silly or stupid individual; one who exhibits either habitual or occasional insufficient discernment or commonsense: chiefly used as a phrase of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • a person who is lacking in judgment or sense; a silly or stupid person; person who exhibits either habitual or periodic insufficient discernment or wise practice: chiefly utilized as a phrase of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • an individual who is gullible and simple to take advantage of
    • One who counterfeits psychological weakness or folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed up in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on their mind, and a mock scepter or bauble in his hand, formerly kept by persons of rank in serach engines for the goal of making recreation. See bauble.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • one that counterfeits emotional weakness or folly; a specialist jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed up in motley, with a pointed cap and bells on his head, and a mock scepter or bauble in the hand, formerly kept by people of rank in serach engines for the goal of making recreation. See bauble.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • Figuratively, something, toy, sport, butt, or sufferer: as, is the trick of situations.
    • A wanton, bad, or sinful individual.
    • Figuratively, something, toy, recreation, butt, or target: as, to be the trick of circumstances.
    • A conical paper limit which dunces at school are often compelled to wear through discipline.
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked individual.
    • a person who is lacking in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic person.
    • to behave like one void of comprehension.
    • A conical report cap which dunces in school are now and again compelled to put on by way of punishment.
    • a person who is lacking in wisdom or good sense; a silly or stupid individual; one who manifests either habitual or periodic insufficient discernment or common sense: mainly made use of as a term of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • To act like one void of understanding.
    • one that counterfeits mental weakness or folly; an expert jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed limit and bells on their mind, and a mock scepter or bauble in his hand, previously kept by persons of rank for the objective of making recreation. See bauble.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • Figuratively, an instrument, model, sport, butt, or sufferer: as, becoming the fool of situations.
    • A light paste of flour and water, like pie-crust.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • A light paste of flour and water, like pie-crust.
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked person.
    • One who is deficient in intellect; a weak-minded or idiotic individual.
    • A conical report limit which dunces in school are now and again compelled to put on by way of punishment.
    • A sort of custard; a dish manufactured from good fresh fruit broken and scalded or stewed and combined with whipped lotion and sugar: as, gooseberry fool.
    • A light paste of flour and water, like pie-crust.
    • One who is deficient in judgment or feeling; a silly or stupid individual; person who manifests either habitual or periodic not enough discernment or wise practice: chiefly made use of as a phrase of disparagement, contempt, or self-depreciation.
    • to do something like one void of comprehension.
    • sort of custard; a dish made of good fresh fruit crushed and scalded or stewed and mixed with whipped ointment and sugar: as, gooseberry fool.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • person who counterfeits psychological weakness or folly; a professional jester or buffoon; a retainer dressed in motley, with a pointed cap and bells on their mind, and a mock scepter or bauble in the hand, previously held by individuals of rank in serach engines for the objective of making sport. See bauble.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • A sort of custard; a dish made of fruit crushed and scalded or stewed and blended with whipped ointment and sugar: as, gooseberry trick.
    • Figuratively, a tool, toy, sport, butt, or victim: as, to be the fool of circumstances.
    • an individual who lacks good view
    • A light paste of flour and liquid, like pie-crust.
    • a person who lacks good judgment
    • an expert clown employed to captivate a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
    • A sort of custard; a dish made from fresh fruit broken and scalded or stewed and combined with whipped cream and sugar: as, gooseberry trick.
    • a person who does not have good judgment
    • a professional clown employed to captivate a king or nobleman in the centre Ages
    • someone who is gullible and easy to take advantage of
    • A light paste of flour and liquid, like pie-crust.
    • A sort of custard; a dish made from good fresh fruit broken and scalded or stewed and blended with whipped ointment and sugar: as, gooseberry fool.
    • an individual who is gullible and easy to make use of
    • an individual who does not have good wisdom
    • A light paste of flour and water, like pie-crust.
    • an expert clown utilized to amuse a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
    • someone who is gullible and simple to take advantage of
    • A wanton, bad, or wicked individual.
    • A conical paper cap which dunces in school are sometimes compelled to wear through punishment.
    • To act like one void of comprehension.
    • Synonyms and Simpleton, ninny, dolt, witling, blockhead. driveler.
    • Harlequin, clown, jester. See zany.
    • sort of custard; a dish made of good fresh fruit broken and scalded or stewed and combined with whipped ointment and sugar: as, gooseberry trick.
    • a professional clown utilized to captivate a king or nobleman in the Middle Ages
    • a person who does not have great wisdom
    • a person who is gullible and simple to make the most of
    • A light paste of flour and water, like pie-crust.
    • A sort of custard; a dish made of good fresh fruit broken and scalded or stewed and combined with whipped lotion and sugar: as, gooseberry trick.
    • a professional clown utilized to captivate a king or nobleman in the centre years
    • a person who does not have good view
    • an individual who is gullible and easy to make the most of
    • someone who does not have great judgment
    • a professional clown utilized to amuse a king or nobleman in the Middle years
    • an expert clown employed to host a king or nobleman in the centre Ages
    • an individual who is gullible and easy to make use of
    • a person who is gullible and simple to benefit from
  • verb-transitive:
    • To deceive or trick; dupe: "trying to learn how to fool a trout with a little little bit of floating fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or prove incorrect; shock, specifically happily: We were certain they'd fail, but they fooled united states.
    • To deceive or trick; dupe: "learning how to fool a trout with some bit of drifting fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or show incorrect; surprise, specifically pleasantly: We were yes they'd fail, however they fooled united states.
    • To deceive or fool; dupe: "trying to learn how exactly to fool a trout with some bit of drifting fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or prove incorrect; shock, particularly pleasantly: we had been yes they would fail, nevertheless they fooled united states.
    • To infatuate; to make foolish.
    • to make use of as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying fashion; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring silly self-confidence.
    • To deceive or trick; dupe: "learning how exactly to fool a trout with some bit of floating fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or show incorrect; shock, specially happily: We were sure they would fail, nonetheless they fooled united states.
    • To infatuate; which will make foolish.
    • To deceive or trick; dupe: "trying to learn how to fool a trout with a little bit of floating fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or prove incorrect; shock, especially pleasantly: we had been sure they'd fail, nevertheless they fooled united states.
    • to make use of as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying fashion; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence.
    • To infatuate; which will make silly.
    • To deceive or trick; dupe: "trying to learn how to fool a trout with a little bit of floating fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or show incorrect; shock, specially pleasantly: we had been certain they might fail, nonetheless they fooled united states.
    • to utilize as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying way; to enforce upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence.
    • To deceive or deceive; dupe: "learning tips fool a trout with some bit of drifting fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or show incorrect; surprise, specially pleasantly: we had been yes they might fail, nonetheless they fooled us.
    • To deceive or fool; dupe: "learning simple tips to fool a trout with some little bit of drifting fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To deceive or fool; dupe: "learning how exactly to fool a trout with some bit of drifting fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or prove wrong; surprise, particularly happily: we had been sure they'd fail, however they fooled us.
    • To confound or show incorrect; shock, specially happily: We were yes they would fail, nevertheless they fooled united states.
    • To infatuate; in order to make silly.
    • to utilize as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying way; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring silly self-confidence.
    • To deceive or trick; dupe: "trying to learn how to fool a trout with a little bit of floating fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or prove incorrect; shock, especially happily: we had been certain they'd fail, but they fooled us.
    • To infatuate; to produce silly.
    • To deceive or trick; dupe: "trying to learn how to fool a trout with a little bit of floating fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • to utilize as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying fashion; to enforce upon; to cheat by inspiring silly self-confidence.
    • To confound or prove wrong; surprise, specially happily: We were certain they'd fail, nonetheless they fooled us.
    • To infatuate; to make foolish.
    • To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying manner; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring silly self-confidence.
    • To deceive or fool; dupe: "learning how exactly to fool a trout with some little bit of floating fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To deceive or deceive; dupe: "trying to learn simple tips to fool a trout with some little bit of floating fur and feather” ( Charles Kuralt).
    • To confound or prove incorrect; shock, specially happily: we had been yes they might fail, but they fooled united states.
    • To confound or show wrong; shock, specifically pleasantly: we had been yes they'd fail, however they fooled us.
    • To infatuate; to create foolish.
    • To infatuate; to create foolish.
    • To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying way; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring silly self-confidence.
    • to utilize as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying way; to enforce upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish self-confidence.
    • To infatuate; to produce foolish.
    • To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying way; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence.
    • To infatuate; to produce foolish.
    • To infatuate; to produce silly.
    • to utilize as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying fashion; to enforce upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish self-confidence.
    • to utilize as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying way; to enforce upon; to cheat by inspiring silly self-confidence.
    • To infatuate; to make foolish.
    • To infatuate; to make foolish.
    • To use as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying way; to impose upon; to cheat by inspiring silly confidence.
    • to make use of as a fool; to deceive in a shameful or mortifying fashion; to enforce upon; to cheat by inspiring foolish confidence.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • Informal To talk or act facetiously or in jest; joke: I happened to be simply fooling when I said I'd to leave.
    • Informal To behave comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; imagine: He said he had a toothache but he was only fooling.
    • to take part in idle or frivolous task.
    • To toy, tinker, or mess: should not fool with suits.
    • Informal To talk or work facetiously or in jest; laugh: I became only fooling whenever I said I'd to leave.
    • Informal To respond comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; pretend: He stated he previously a toothache but he had been just fooling.
    • to take part in idle or frivolous activity.
    • To toy, tinker, or mess: shouldn't fool with suits.
    • Informal To talk or work facetiously or perhaps in jest; joke: I was only fooling when I stated I experienced to go out of.
    • Informal To act comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; imagine: He stated he previously a toothache but he had been just fooling.
    • To engage in idle or frivolous task.
    • To toy, tinker, or mess: should never fool with matches.
    • To play the fool; to trifle; to model; to blow amount of time in idle sport or mirth.
    • Informal To talk or work facetiously or perhaps in jest; laugh: I was only fooling once I said I had to leave.
    • Informal To respond comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; imagine: He stated he previously a toothache but he was only fooling.
    • to try out the trick; to trifle; to toy; to expend amount of time in idle recreation or mirth.
    • to take part in idle or frivolous task.
    • To model, tinker, or mess: should not fool with suits.
    • To play the fool; to trifle; to model; to expend time in idle recreation or mirth.
    • Informal To speak or act facetiously or perhaps in jest; laugh: I happened to be simply fooling whenever I stated I had to leave.
    • Informal To respond comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; pretend: He stated he previously a toothache but he had been just fooling.
    • To engage in idle or frivolous activity.
    • To toy, tinker, or mess: should not fool with matches.
    • Informal To speak or act facetiously or perhaps in jest; laugh: I happened to be just fooling whenever I said I'd to go out of.
    • Informal To behave comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; imagine: He said he'd a toothache but he had been only fooling.
    • to take part in idle or frivolous task.
    • To doll, tinker, or mess: should never fool with suits.
    • Informal To speak or work facetiously or perhaps in jest; laugh: I became simply fooling once I said I had to leave.
    • Informal To respond comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; pretend: He said he'd a toothache but he had been only fooling.
    • To engage in idle or frivolous activity.
    • Informal To speak or work facetiously or in jest; joke: I happened to be only fooling whenever I stated I experienced to leave.
    • To toy, tinker, or mess: shouldn't fool with matches.
    • Informal To speak or act facetiously or perhaps in jest; laugh: I was just fooling whenever I stated I'd to go out of.
    • Informal To behave comically; clown.
    • to relax and play the fool; to trifle; to doll; to expend time in idle sport or mirth.
    • Informal To act comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; pretend: He said he'd a toothache but he was only fooling.
    • To engage in idle or frivolous activity.
    • Informal To feign; imagine: He said he previously a toothache but he had been just fooling.
    • to take part in idle or frivolous activity.
    • To toy, tinker, or mess: shouldn't fool with matches.
    • to try out the fool; to trifle; to model; to spend time in idle sport or mirth.
    • To toy, tinker, or mess: should not fool with matches.
    • Informal To talk or work facetiously or perhaps in jest; laugh: I happened to be just fooling once I stated I'd to go out of.
    • to try out the fool; to trifle; to doll; to pay time in idle sport or mirth.
    • Informal To respond comically; clown.
    • Informal To speak or work facetiously or perhaps in jest; joke: I happened to be simply fooling when I said I had to go out of.
    • Informal To feign; pretend: He said he'd a toothache but he had been only fooling.
    • To engage in idle or frivolous activity.
    • Informal To respond comically; clown.
    • To doll, tinker, or mess: should not fool with suits.
    • Informal To speak or act facetiously or in jest; laugh: I happened to be only fooling whenever I stated I experienced to go out of.
    • Informal To talk or act facetiously or in jest; laugh: I was simply fooling when I stated I had to leave.
    • Informal To feign; pretend: He said he'd a toothache but he had been only fooling.
    • To engage in idle or frivolous activity.
    • Informal To act comically; clown.
    • Informal To respond comically; clown.
    • Informal To feign; imagine: He said he previously a toothache but he had been only fooling.
    • To toy, tinker, or mess: should not fool with suits.
    • Informal To feign; imagine: He said he'd a toothache but he had been just fooling.
    • to take part in idle or frivolous activity.
    • To engage in idle or frivolous task.
    • To model, tinker, or mess: should not fool with matches.
    • To model, tinker, or mess: shouldn't fool with matches.
    • To play the fool; to trifle; to model; to invest amount of time in idle sport or mirth.
    • to relax and play the trick; to trifle; to toy; to invest amount of time in idle recreation or mirth.
    • to try out the fool; to trifle; to toy; to pay amount of time in idle recreation or mirth.
    • to try out the fool; to trifle; to toy; to invest amount of time in idle recreation or mirth.
    • to relax and play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to expend amount of time in idle sport or mirth.
    • to relax and play the trick; to trifle; to model; to invest amount of time in idle sport or mirth.
    • to relax and play the fool; to trifle; to doll; to expend time in idle sport or mirth.
  • adjective:
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: down on some fool errand or any other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: down on some fool errand or any other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: off on some trick errand or any other.
    • casual Foolish; stupid: off on some trick errand or any other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: down on some trick errand or other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: down on some fool errand or other.
    • casual Foolish; stupid: off on some fool errand or other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: off on some fool errand or other.
    • casual Foolish; stupid: down on some trick errand or other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: down on some trick errand or any other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: off on some fool errand or other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: down on some fool errand or any other.
    • Informal Foolish; stupid: down on some trick errand or any other.
  • phrasal-verb:
    • fool around Informal to take part in idle or informal activity; putter: ended up being fooling around utilizing the old automobile hoping of repairing it.
    • trick around Informal to take part in frivolous activity; make enjoyable.
    • trick around Informal to take part in informal, frequently promiscuous sexual functions.
    • fool around Informal to take part in idle or informal task; putter: had been fooling around because of the old car in hopes of repairing it.
    • fool away To waste (time or cash) foolishly; squander: fooled away the week's pay on Friday night.
    • fool around Informal To engage in frivolous task; make fun.
    • fool around Informal to take part in everyday, often promiscuous intimate acts.
    • trick away To waste (time or money) foolishly; squander: tricked away the week's pay on Friday night.
    • fool around Informal To engage in idle or casual task; putter: was fooling around using the old automobile hoping of repairing it.
    • fool around Informal To engage in frivolous task; make enjoyable.
    • fool around Informal to take part in everyday, usually promiscuous sexual functions.
    • fool away To waste (time or cash) foolishly; squander: tricked away the few days's pay on Friday night.
    • trick around Informal To engage in idle or informal activity; putter: had been fooling around using old car hoping of fixing it.
    • trick around Informal to take part in frivolous activity; make fun.
    • trick around Informal to take part in everyday, usually promiscuous sexual acts.
    • trick away To waste (time or cash) foolishly; squander: tricked away the week's pay on Friday night.
    • fool around Informal to take part in idle or casual task; putter: had been fooling around utilizing the old automobile in hopes of repairing it.
    • fool around Informal To engage in frivolous activity; make enjoyable.
    • fool around Informal to take part in casual, often promiscuous sexual acts.
    • fool away To waste (time or cash) foolishly; squander: tricked away the week's pay on Friday night.
    • fool around Informal To engage in idle or casual task; putter: had been fooling around with the old automobile hoping of fixing it.
    • fool around Informal to take part in frivolous task; make enjoyable.
    • trick around Informal to take part in casual, often promiscuous intimate acts.
    • trick away To waste (time or cash) foolishly; squander: tricked away the few days's pay on Friday night.
    • fool around Informal to take part in idle or informal activity; putter: was fooling around using old automobile assured of fixing it.
    • trick around Informal to take part in frivolous task; make enjoyable.
    • trick around Informal To engage in casual, often promiscuous sexual acts.
    • fool away To waste (time or cash) foolishly; squander: tricked away the few days's pay on Friday evening.
    • trick around Informal To engage in idle or everyday activity; putter: ended up being fooling around with all the old car assured of repairing it.
    • fool around Informal to take part in idle or informal activity; putter: was fooling around with the old vehicle assured of repairing it.
    • trick around Informal To engage in frivolous task; make fun.
    • trick around Informal To engage in frivolous activity; make enjoyable.
    • trick around Informal To engage in casual, frequently promiscuous intimate acts.
    • trick away To waste (time or money) foolishly; squander: fooled away the few days's pay on Friday evening.
    • fool around Informal To engage in casual, often promiscuous sexual acts.
    • trick away To waste (time or cash) foolishly; squander: tricked away the few days's pay on Friday night.
    • trick around Informal To engage in idle or informal activity; putter: ended up being fooling around utilizing the old vehicle hoping of repairing it.
    • trick around Informal to take part in idle or casual task; putter: was fooling around using the old vehicle in hopes of correcting it.
    • trick around Informal to take part in idle or everyday task; putter: had been fooling around because of the old car hoping of fixing it.
    • trick around Informal to take part in frivolous task; make enjoyable.
    • fool around Informal To engage in frivolous task; make fun.
    • trick around Informal To engage in frivolous activity; make enjoyable.
    • fool around Informal to take part in informal, usually promiscuous intimate acts.
    • fool around Informal to take part in informal, frequently promiscuous intimate functions.
    • fool away To waste (time or cash) foolishly; squander: tricked away the few days's pay on Friday night.
    • fool away To waste (time or money) foolishly; squander: tricked away the week's pay on Friday night.
    • trick around Informal to take part in idle or casual task; putter: ended up being fooling around using old vehicle assured of fixing it.
    • fool around Informal To engage in casual, usually promiscuous sexual acts.
    • fool around Informal to take part in frivolous task; make fun.
    • trick away To waste (time or money) foolishly; squander: fooled away the week's pay on Friday evening.
    • fool around Informal To engage in everyday, usually promiscuous sexual functions.
    • trick away To waste (time or money) foolishly; squander: tricked away the week's pay on Friday evening.
  • idiom:
    • play To act in an irresponsible or foolish manner.
    • play To act in a playful or comical way.
    • play to do something in an irresponsible or silly way.
    • play To behave in a playful or comical manner.
    • play To act in an irresponsible or foolish fashion.
    • play To respond in a playful or comical way.
    • play To act in an irresponsible or silly fashion.
    • perform To respond in a playful or comical fashion.
    • play To act in an irresponsible or silly fashion.
    • play to do something in an irresponsible or foolish manner.
    • play To act in a playful or comical way.
    • play To respond in a playful or comical manner.
    • play to do something in an irresponsible or silly fashion.
    • play To act in a playful or comical manner.
    • play to behave in an irresponsible or foolish way.
    • play To act in a playful or comical fashion.
    • play to behave in an irresponsible or foolish fashion.
    • perform To respond in a playful or comical way.
    • play to behave in an irresponsible or silly manner.
    • play to behave in an irresponsible or silly way.
    • play To behave in a playful or comical way.
    • play To act in a playful or comical manner.
    • play to do something in an irresponsible or silly way.
    • play To behave in a playful or comical manner.
    • play to behave in an irresponsible or silly fashion.
    • play To respond in a playful or comical manner.
  • verb:
    • To deceive; to create a fool of someone.
    • To fool; to help make a fool of someone.
    • To deceive; to make a fool of somebody.
    • trick or hoax
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • invest frivolously and unwisely
    • enjoy horseplay
    • To fool; in order to make a fool of somebody.
    • To trick; to make a fool of someone.
    • To trick; to create a fool of someone.
    • fool or hoax
    • trick or hoax
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • spend frivolously and unwisely
    • invest frivolously and unwisely
    • have pleasure in horseplay
    • have pleasure in horseplay
    • To deceive; in order to make a fool of somebody.
    • To fool; which will make a fool of someone.
    • To fool; which will make a fool of somebody.
    • trick or hoax
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • trick or hoax
    • spend frivolously and unwisely
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • To fool; to make a fool of someone.
    • To fool; to produce a fool of someone.
    • indulge in horseplay
    • invest frivolously and unwisely
    • To fool; which will make a fool of someone.
    • fool or hoax
    • enjoy horseplay
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • To deceive; in order to make a fool of someone.
    • spend frivolously and unwisely
    • indulge in horseplay
    • fool or hoax
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • fool or hoax
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • spend frivolously and unwisely
    • trick or hoax
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • spend frivolously and unwisely
    • enjoy horseplay
    • fool or hoax
    • indulge in horseplay
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • invest frivolously and unwisely
    • enjoy horseplay
    • spend frivolously and unwisely
    • fool or hoax
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • fool or hoax
    • have pleasure in horseplay
    • invest frivolously and unwisely
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • have pleasure in horseplay
    • fool or hoax
    • invest frivolously and unwisely
    • make a fool or dupe of
    • invest frivolously and unwisely
    • enjoy horseplay
    • indulge in horseplay
  • others:
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to relax and play the fool; become a weak-minded or silly person; potter aimlessly or mischievously; model; trifle.
    • to try out the buffoon; behave as a fool or jester.
    • to produce a fool of; reveal to contempt; disappoint; deceive; impose on.
    • to produce silly; infatuate.
    • To beguile; cheat: as, to fool one regarding his cash.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to relax and play the trick; act like a weak-minded or silly person; potter aimlessly or mischievously; doll; trifle.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • To play the buffoon; work as a fool or jester.
    • to try out the trick; behave like a weak-minded or silly person; potter aimlessly or mischievously; model; trifle.
    • In order to make a fool of; reveal to contempt; disappoint; deceive; impose on.
    • to try out the buffoon; work as a fool or jester.
    • which will make silly; infatuate.
    • which will make a fool of; reveal to contempt; dissatisfy; deceive; impose on.
    • To beguile; cheat: as, to fool one out-of their money.
    • To make silly; infatuate.
    • To beguile; cheat: because, to fool one away from their money.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to try out the trick; become a weak-minded or silly person; potter aimlessly or mischievously; model; trifle.
    • to try out the buffoon; behave as a fool or jester.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to try out the trick; act like a weak-minded or foolish individual; potter aimlessly or mischievously; doll; trifle.
    • In order to make a fool of; reveal to contempt; dissatisfy; deceive; impose on.
    • To play the buffoon; become a fool or jester.
    • to produce a fool of; expose to contempt; disappoint; deceive; impose on.
    • to create foolish; infatuate.
    • To beguile; cheat: because, to fool one away from their cash.
    • To make foolish; infatuate.
    • To beguile; cheat: because, to fool one off his money.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to relax and play the trick; become a weak-minded or foolish person; potter aimlessly or mischievously; model; trifle.
    • To play the buffoon; behave as a fool or jester.
    • In order to make a trick of; reveal to contempt; disappoint; deceive; impose on.
    • In order to make foolish; infatuate.
    • To beguile; cheat: because, to fool one out-of his cash.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to try out the fool; become a weak-minded or foolish person; potter aimlessly or mischievously; doll; trifle.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to relax and play the trick; become a weak-minded or foolish individual; potter aimlessly or mischievously; model; trifle.
    • to relax and play the buffoon; become a fool or jester.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • To play the buffoon; act as a fool or jester.
    • to create a fool of; expose to contempt; disappoint; deceive; enforce on.
    • To play the fool; behave like a weak-minded or silly individual; potter aimlessly or mischievously; model; trifle.
    • which will make a fool of; reveal to contempt; disappoint; deceive; impose on.
    • To play the buffoon; act as a fool or jester.
    • to help make silly; infatuate.
    • To make a fool of; expose to contempt; dissatisfy; deceive; impose on.
    • To beguile; cheat: since, to fool one off his money.
    • to help make silly; infatuate.
    • To beguile; cheat: because, to fool one out-of their cash.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to produce foolish; infatuate.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • To beguile; cheat: as, to fool one from his money.
    • To play the fool; become a weak-minded or silly person; potter aimlessly or mischievously; doll; trifle.
    • to relax and play the buffoon; act as a fool or jester.
    • to relax and play the trick; act like a weak-minded or silly individual; potter aimlessly or mischievously; model; trifle.
    • which will make a fool of; reveal to contempt; disappoint; deceive; impose on.
    • to try out the buffoon; act as a fool or jester.
    • to produce foolish; infatuate.
    • which will make a fool of; expose to contempt; disappoint; deceive; impose on.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • To beguile; cheat: since, to fool one away from their money.
    • to try out the trick; behave like a weak-minded or foolish person; potter aimlessly or mischievously; doll; trifle.
    • to produce silly; infatuate.
    • to relax and play the buffoon; behave as a fool or jester.
    • To beguile; cheat: because, to fool one off their money.
    • To make a fool of; expose to contempt; dissatisfy; deceive; impose on.
    • In order to make foolish; infatuate.
    • To beguile; cheat: as, to fool one regarding their cash.
    • Foolish; silly.
    • to relax and play the fool; behave like a weak-minded or foolish individual; potter aimlessly or mischievously; toy; trifle.
    • To play the buffoon; behave as a fool or jester.
    • to produce a fool of; reveal to contempt; disappoint; deceive; impose on.
    • to help make silly; infatuate.
    • To beguile; cheat: since, to fool one out of his cash.

Related Sources

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