flying buttress definition

  • noun:
    • An arched masonry help offering to keep thrust, as from a roof or vault, away from a primary structure to an outer pier or buttress. Also called arc-boutant.
    • a buttress that stands apart from construction it aids, and is linked to it by an arch (flyer).
    • See Flying buttress.
    • a buttress that stands apart from the primary construction and connected to it by an arch
    • An arched masonry help providing to keep thrust, as from a roof or vault, from a main structure to an outer pier or buttress. Also known as arc-boutant.
    • a buttress that is distinguishable through the structure that it supports, and is attached to it by an arch (flyer).
    • See Flying buttress.
    • An arched masonry support serving to bear pushed, as from a roof or vault, away from a primary structure to an outer pier or buttress. Also referred to as arc-boutant.
    • a buttress that stands apart from the construction that it aids, and it is attached to it by an arch (flyer).
    • See Flying buttress.
    • a buttress that stands apart from the primary construction and attached to it by an arch
    • An arched masonry help providing to keep pushed, as from a roof or vault, from a main framework to an outer pier or buttress. Also known as arc-boutant.
    • a buttress that is distinguishable through the primary construction and connected to it by an arch
    • a buttress that stands apart from framework it supports, and it is attached to it by an arch (flyer).
    • See Flying buttress.
    • a buttress that stands apart from the main structure and attached to it by an arch
    • An arched masonry support providing to bear thrust, as from a roof or vault, from a main construction to an outer pier or buttress. Also called arc-boutant.
    • An arched masonry support offering to bear pushed, as from a roof or vault, far from a principal framework to an outer pier or buttress. Also referred to as arc-boutant.
    • An arched masonry assistance offering to bear thrust, as from a roof or vault, from a principal construction to an outer pier or buttress. Also called arc-boutant.
    • a buttress that is distinguishable from the framework it supports, and is attached to it by an arch (flyer).
    • An arched masonry support offering to bear thrust, as from a roof or vault, away from a primary structure to an outer pier or buttress. Also referred to as arc-boutant.
    • See Flying buttress.
    • a buttress that stands apart from the framework it supports, and it is attached to it by an arch (flyer).
    • a buttress that stands apart through the structure it aids, and it is connected to it by an arch (flyer).
    • a buttress that stands apart through the framework it aids, and it is linked to it by an arch (flyer).
    • See Flying buttress.
    • See Flying buttress.
    • See Flying buttress.
    • a buttress that is distinguishable from the main framework and connected to it by an arch
    • An arched masonry help offering to bear pushed, as from a roof or vault, far from a principal structure to an outer pier or buttress. Also referred to as arc-boutant.
    • a buttress that is distinguishable through the primary construction and attached to it by an arch
    • a buttress that stands apart from the construction so it supports, and it is connected to it by an arch (flyer).
    • a buttress that is distinguishable from the main framework and linked to it by an arch
    • a buttress that stands apart from main construction and linked to it by an arch
    • See Flying buttress.
    • a buttress that is distinguishable from main framework and attached to it by an arch
  • adjective:
    • a contrivance when planning on taking within the thrust of a roof or vault which could not be supported by ordinary buttresses. It includes a straight club of masonry, typically sloping, continued an arch, and a good pier or buttress adequate to get the thrust. The phrase is normally applied simply to the right club with promoting arch.
    • a contrivance when planning on taking within the push of a roof or vault which can never be supported by ordinary buttresses. It comes with a straight club of masonry, frequently sloping, continued an arch, and a great pier or buttress sufficient for the push. The word is normally applied simply to the straight bar with encouraging arch.
    • a contrivance to take within the thrust of a roof or vault which could not be sustained by ordinary buttresses. It comes with a straight club of masonry, generally sloping, continued an arch, and a good pier or buttress sufficient for the thrust. Your message is normally applied and then the right club with encouraging arch.
    • a contrivance for taking up the push of a roof or vault that may never be supported by ordinary buttresses. It is made of a straight club of masonry, generally sloping, continued an arch, and a good pier or buttress sufficient to get the thrust. The word is normally applied simply to the right bar with encouraging arch.
    • a contrivance to take up the push of a roof or vault that may not be sustained by ordinary buttresses. It contains a straight bar of masonry, usually sloping, continued an arch, and a good pier or buttress adequate to get the thrust. The term is generally applied only to the right bar with encouraging arch.
    • a contrivance for taking within the push of a roof or vault which could never be supported by ordinary buttresses. It is made of a straight club of masonry, usually sloping, continued an arch, and a good pier or buttress adequate to receive the thrust. The word is generally used simply to the right club with supporting arch.
    • a contrivance for taking up the push of a roof or vault that may never be supported by ordinary buttresses. It is made from a straight club of masonry, frequently sloping, carried on an arch, and a good pier or buttress adequate for the thrust. The term is typically used only to the right club with encouraging arch.
    • a contrivance to take within the thrust of a roof or vault that may never be supported by ordinary buttresses. It is made from a straight bar of masonry, usually sloping, continued an arch, and a great pier or buttress sufficient to receive the thrust. Your message is typically used and then the straight club with promoting arch.
    • a contrivance for taking within the thrust of a roof or vault that may not be supported by ordinary buttresses. It consist of a straight club of masonry, often sloping, carried on an arch, and a good pier or buttress adequate for the push. The term is typically applied only to the right bar with promoting arch.

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