flutter definition

  • verb-intransitive:
    • To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular manner: curtains that fluttered in breeze.
    • To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular manner: curtains that fluttered into the snap.
    • To fly by a quick light flapping of the wings.
    • To travel by an instant light flapping regarding the wings.
    • To flap the wings without traveling.
    • To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular fashion: curtains that fluttered into the breeze.
    • To Go or fall-in a way suggestive of tremulous trip: "Her hands rose, fell, and fluttered utilizing the rhythm associated with the tune” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular way: curtains that fluttered in the snap.
    • To flap the wings without flying.
    • To fly by an instant light flapping of wings.
    • To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular fashion: curtains that fluttered when you look at the snap.
    • To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular fashion: curtains that fluttered in the breeze.
    • To fly by a fast light flapping of wings.
    • To vibrate or overcome rapidly or erratically: My heart fluttered extremely.
    • To flap the wings without flying.
    • To move or fall-in a fashion suggestive of tremulous flight: "Her arms rose, fell, and fluttered using rhythm for the track” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To wave or flap quickly in an irregular fashion: curtains that fluttered into the piece of cake.
    • To move quickly in a nervous, restless, or excited fashion; flit.
    • To flap the wings without flying.
    • To wave or flap quickly in an irregular manner: curtains that fluttered inside snap.
    • To travel by a quick light flapping of wings.
    • To Go or fall in a fashion suggestive of tremulous trip: "Her hands rose, fell, and fluttered utilizing the rhythm associated with the tune” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To vibrate or defeat quickly or erratically: My heart fluttered extremely.
    • To fly by an instant light flapping for the wings.
    • To fly by a quick light flapping of wings.
    • To move or fall in a fashion suggestive of tremulous trip: "The Woman hands rose, fell, and fluttered using rhythm of the track” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To flap the wings without traveling.
    • To flap the wings without flying.
    • To vibrate or beat quickly or erratically: My heart fluttered wildly.
    • To move quickly in a nervous, restless, or excited fashion; flit.
    • To travel by an instant light flapping of wings.
    • To Go or fall-in a manner suggestive of tremulous journey: "Her arms rose, fell, and fluttered using rhythm of this song” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To vibrate or overcome quickly or erratically: My heart fluttered wildly.
    • To flap the wings without flying.
    • to maneuver rapidly in a nervous, restless, or excited style; flit.
    • To flap the wings without traveling.
    • To move or fall in a manner suggestive of tremulous flight: "Her arms rose, fell, and fluttered with the rhythm of the song” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To vibrate or defeat quickly or erratically: My heart fluttered extremely.
    • To move rapidly in a nervous, restless, or excited style; flit.
    • To Maneuver or fall-in a manner suggestive of tremulous flight: "Her hands rose, fell, and fluttered with all the rhythm for the tune” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To move or fall in a fashion suggestive of tremulous flight: "Her arms rose, dropped, and fluttered using rhythm associated with tune” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To vibrate or defeat rapidly or erratically: My heart fluttered wildly.
    • To vibrate or overcome quickly or erratically: My heart fluttered extremely.
    • to go rapidly in a nervous, restless, or excited style; flit.
    • To move rapidly in a nervous, restless, or excited manner; flit.
    • To move rapidly in a nervous, restless, or excited style; flit.
    • To vibrate or overcome rapidly or erratically: My heart fluttered extremely.
    • to go quickly in a nervous, restless, or excited style; flit.
    • To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular manner: curtains that fluttered into the breeze.
    • To travel by a fast light flapping of wings.
    • To flap the wings without flying.
    • To move or fall-in a fashion suggestive of tremulous flight: "Her hands rose, fell, and fluttered with all the rhythm for the track” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To vibrate or beat rapidly or erratically: My heart fluttered extremely.
    • to go rapidly in a nervous, restless, or excited style; flit.
    • To wave or flap quickly in an irregular way: curtains that fluttered into the snap.
    • To wave or flap quickly in an irregular manner: curtains that fluttered inside breeze.
    • To fly by a quick light flapping of this wings.
    • To fly by a fast light flapping regarding the wings.
    • To flap the wings without flying.
    • To flap the wings without traveling.
    • To Go or fall in a manner suggestive of tremulous trip: "Her arms rose, dropped, and fluttered with the rhythm associated with tune” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To Maneuver or fall in a manner suggestive of tremulous flight: "Her hands rose, dropped, and fluttered using the rhythm regarding the song” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To wave or flap rapidly in an irregular fashion: curtains that fluttered in piece of cake.
    • To vibrate or beat quickly or erratically: My heart fluttered extremely.
    • To vibrate or overcome rapidly or erratically: My heart fluttered extremely.
    • to go quickly in a nervous, restless, or excited manner; flit.
    • to go quickly in a nervous, restless, or excited style; flit.
    • To fly by a quick light flapping of the wings.
    • To flap the wings without flying.
    • To Maneuver or fall in a manner suggestive of tremulous trip: "Her arms rose, fell, and fluttered using rhythm regarding the track” ( Evelyn Waugh).
    • To vibrate or defeat quickly or erratically: My heart fluttered wildly.
    • To move quickly in a nervous, restless, or excited style; flit.
  • verb-transitive:
    • Resulting In to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black eyelashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black colored lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering the woman bristly black eyelashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • Resulting In to flutter: "fluttering the woman bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To vibrate or move quickly.
    • To vibrate or move rapidly.
    • to operate a vehicle in disorder; to put into confusion.
    • to operate a vehicle in condition; to put into confusion.
    • To vibrate or move rapidly.
    • to-drive in disorder; to throw into confusion.
    • To vibrate or move quickly.
    • to push in condition; to put into confusion.
    • To vibrate or go rapidly.
    • To vibrate or go rapidly.
    • To drive in condition; to toss into confusion.
    • To drive in condition; to throw into confusion.
    • To vibrate or go quickly.
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • to-drive in condition; to throw into confusion.
    • To vibrate or move rapidly.
    • to operate a vehicle in disorder; to toss into confusion.
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering the woman bristly black colored lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering the woman bristly black eyelashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To vibrate or move quickly.
    • To drive in condition; to put into confusion.
    • To cause to flutter: "fluttering her bristly black lashes as swiftly as butterflies' wings” ( Margaret Mitchell).
    • To vibrate or move quickly.
    • to push in condition; to throw into confusion.
    • To vibrate or go rapidly.
    • to operate a vehicle in condition; to put into confusion.
    • To vibrate or move quickly.
    • to-drive in condition; to put into confusion.
  • noun:
    • The act of fluttering.
    • A condition of nervous excitement or agitation: everybody was in a flutter over the development that manager was resigning.
    • The act of fluttering.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • The act of fluttering.
    • A condition of nervous excitement or agitation: Everyone was in a flutter throughout the news that manager had been resigning.
    • The act of fluttering.
    • Pathology unusually rapid pulsation, specifically of atria or ventricles of heart.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • A condition of nervous pleasure or agitation: individuals were in a flutter on the news that the director ended up being resigning.
    • a disorder of stressed pleasure or agitation: individuals were in a flutter within the news that the manager had been resigning.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • Rapid fluctuation in pitch of an audio reproduction caused by variants when you look at the speed regarding the recording or reproducing gear.
    • Pathology unusually quick pulsation, particularly of atria or ventricles associated with heart.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • Chiefly British a little wager; a gamble: "If they fancy a flutter, Rick gets all of them better chances compared to bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • The act of fluttering.
    • a disorder of nervous pleasure or agitation: everybody was in a flutter across development that manager ended up being resigning.
    • fast fluctuation within the pitch of a sound reproduction resulting from variants into the rate for the recording or reproducing gear.
    • an ailment of nervous excitement or agitation: everybody was in a flutter across news your director was resigning.
    • Pathology Abnormally fast pulsation, particularly of atria or ventricles of the heart.
    • an ailment of stressed pleasure or agitation: Everyone was in a flutter on the development that the director was resigning.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • Chiefly British A small bet; a gamble: "If they like a flutter, Rick will get them better odds than the bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • Pathology Abnormally fast pulsation, specifically regarding the atria or ventricles associated with heart.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • Rapid fluctuation inside pitch of a sound reproduction caused by variants into the speed associated with the recording or reproducing equipment.
    • a disorder of stressed pleasure or agitation: everybody was in a flutter throughout the development the manager had been resigning.
    • Rapid fluctuation into the pitch of an audio reproduction caused by variants into the speed for the recording or reproducing equipment.
    • Chiefly British A small bet; a gamble: "If they like a flutter, Rick will get them better odds than the bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • Pathology Abnormally fast pulsation, especially associated with atria or ventricles of heart.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • The act of fluttering.
    • Chiefly British a tiny wager; a gamble: "when they like a flutter, Rick gets all of them better chances than the bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • Rapid fluctuation when you look at the pitch of an audio reproduction caused by variations when you look at the rate for the recording or reproducing equipment.
    • Pathology unusually fast pulsation, especially of atria or ventricles of the heart.
    • A state of agitation.
    • Chiefly British a little wager; a gamble: "should they fancy a flutter, Rick are certain to get all of them much better odds than the bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • The work of fluttering.
    • Rapid fluctuation inside pitch of a sound reproduction caused by variations when you look at the rate regarding the recording or reproducing gear.
    • An abnormal fast pulsation of heart.
    • a situation of agitation.
    • a little wager or risky financial investment.
    • Chiefly British a little bet; a gamble: "when they like a flutter, Rick will get them better odds versus bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • The act of fluttering.
    • An abnormal quick pulsation regarding the heart.
    • A state of agitation.
    • Pathology uncommonly quick pulsation, especially for the atria or ventricles regarding the heart.
    • Pathology Abnormally quick pulsation, specifically of atria or ventricles for the heart.
    • An abnormal quick pulsation of this heart.
    • a little wager or risky investment.
    • The act of fluttering.
    • a little wager or dangerous investment.
    • A state of agitation.
    • fast fluctuation inside pitch of a sound reproduction resulting from variants into the rate associated with recording or reproducing gear.
    • fast fluctuation into the pitch of a sound reproduction resulting from variants in the rate of this recording or reproducing gear.
    • Chiefly British A small bet; a gamble: "If they like a flutter, Rick will get them better odds than the bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • Chiefly British a tiny wager; a gamble: "should they like a flutter, Rick gets all of them better odds as compared to bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • The act of fluttering.
    • An abnormal rapid pulsation associated with heart.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • A state of agitation.
    • a tiny wager or risky investment.
    • The act of fluttering; fast and unusual movement; vibration.
    • circumstances of agitation.
    • The work of fluttering; fast and irregular motion; vibration.
    • The work of fluttering; quick and irregular movement; vibration.
    • An abnormal quick pulsation regarding the heart.
    • An abnormal rapid pulsation for the heart.
    • Hurry; tumult; agitation for the head; confusion; condition.
    • Hurry; tumult; agitation of this brain; confusion; disorder.
    • A small bet or risky investment.
    • The work of fluttering; quick and irregular motion; vibration.
    • A small bet or high-risk financial investment.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • Hurry; tumult; agitation of the mind; confusion; disorder.
    • Hurry; tumult; agitation of head; confusion; disorder.
    • A state of agitation.
    • The act of fluttering.
    • The act of fluttering; fast and unusual motion; vibration.
    • An abnormal rapid pulsation of heart.
    • rush; tumult; agitation of mind; confusion; disorder.
    • The act of fluttering; quick and unusual movement; vibration.
    • a situation of agitation.
    • A small wager or high-risk financial investment.
    • rush; tumult; agitation of this brain; confusion; condition.
    • An abnormal fast pulsation of this heart.
    • A small wager or dangerous financial investment.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • The act of fluttering; fast and unusual motion; vibration.
    • Quick and unusual movement, by wings; fast vibration, undulation, or pulsation: as, the flutter of an admirer or for the heart.
    • A condition of nervous excitement or agitation: everybody was in a flutter over the development that the director had been resigning.
    • fast and unusual motion, as of wings; quick vibration, undulation, or pulsation: since, the flutter of an admirer or for the heart.
    • rush; tumult; agitation of brain; confusion; disorder.
    • Agitation; confusion; confused or excited feeling or action.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • Agitation; confusion; perplexed or excited sensation or action.
    • A flow of mingled water and vapor from the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This happens in locomotives whenever boiler primes, or works water in to the cylinders.
    • The work of fluttering; quick and irregular motion; vibration.
    • Pathology Abnormally quick pulsation, particularly regarding the atria or ventricles of this heart.
    • A flow of mingled water and steam from the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This happens in locomotives whenever boiler primes, or works water into the cylinders.
    • Rapid fluctuation within the pitch of an audio reproduction caused by variations within the rate of recording or reproducing equipment.
    • rush; tumult; agitation for the mind; confusion; condition.
    • Chiefly British a tiny wager; a gamble: "when they fancy a flutter, Rick will get them better odds as compared to bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • fast and unusual movement, by wings; quick vibration, undulation, or pulsation: as, the flutter of a fan or associated with heart.
    • Quick and unusual movement, since wings; fast vibration, undulation, or pulsation: because, the flutter of a fan or for the heart.
    • the motion produced by flapping along
    • the act of moving backwards and forwards
    • Agitation; confusion; perplexed or excited experience or action.
    • Agitation; confusion; puzzled or excited sensation or activity.
    • A flow of mingled water and steam through the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This happens in locomotives if the boiler primes, or works water in to the cylinders.
    • fast and irregular motion, since wings; rapid vibration, undulation, or pulsation: as, the flutter of an admirer or associated with heart.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • unusually rapid beating associated with the auricles of the heart (especially in a typical rhythm); can lead to heart block
    • Agitation; confusion; confused or excited feeling or action.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • A state of agitation.
    • A flow of mingled liquid and vapor from gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This takes place in locomotives if the boiler primes, or works water to the cylinders.
    • The act of fluttering.
    • An abnormal quick pulsation associated with the heart.
    • a disorder of nervous pleasure or agitation: individuals were in a flutter within the development that the manager had been resigning.
    • A condition of nervous pleasure or agitation: Everyone was in a flutter within the development that manager had been resigning.
    • Quick and irregular motion, at the time of wings; quick vibration, undulation, or pulsation: since, the flutter of an admirer or for the heart.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • A flow of mingled water and vapor through the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This does occur in locomotives once the boiler primes, or works liquid in to the cylinders.
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • Quick and irregular motion, by wings; quick vibration, undulation, or pulsation: as, the flutter of an admirer or for the heart.
    • Agitation; confusion; perplexed or excited experience or activity.
    • the movement produced by flapping up-and-down
    • Pathology Abnormally rapid pulsation, particularly of the atria or ventricles of the heart.
    • the motion made by flapping down and up
    • a tiny bet or high-risk financial investment.
    • Pathology uncommonly quick pulsation, specially of atria or ventricles of heart.
    • the work of moving back-and-forth
    • the motion produced by flapping up-and-down
    • A flow of mingled liquid and vapor through the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This occurs in locomotives when the boiler primes, or works water into the cylinders.
    • Agitation; confusion; puzzled or excited sensation or action.
    • Rapid fluctuation in pitch of a sound reproduction caused by variants within the speed of this recording or reproducing equipment.
    • Quick and irregular movement, since wings; rapid vibration, undulation, or pulsation: because, the flutter of an admirer or associated with heart.
    • the work of moving back-and-forth
    • the movement created by flapping up and down
    • A flow of mingled liquid and vapor from gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This happens in locomotives as soon as the boiler primes, or works water to the cylinders.
    • Agitation; confusion; perplexed or excited sensation or action.
    • Chiefly British a tiny bet; a gamble: "should they fancy a flutter, Rick are certain to get them much better chances as compared to bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • the act of going to and fro
    • The act of fluttering; fast and irregular movement; vibration.
    • the act of going backwards and forwards
    • A flow of mingled liquid and steam from the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This takes place in locomotives if the boiler primes, or works water to the cylinders.
    • unusually fast beating of the auricles of heart (especially in a frequent rhythm); can lead to heart block
    • Hurry; tumult; agitation regarding the mind; confusion; condition.
    • unusually quick beating regarding the auricles associated with heart (especially in a typical rhythm); may result in heart block
    • the movement made by flapping along
    • uncommonly quick beating of the auricles of heart (especially in an everyday rhythm); can result in heart block
    • the act of moving back-and-forth
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • The work of fluttering.
    • Rapid fluctuation into the pitch of a sound reproduction resulting from variations when you look at the rate of the recording or reproducing gear.
    • unusually quick beating of the auricles for the heart (especially in an everyday rhythm); can lead to heart block
    • A condition of stressed pleasure or agitation: individuals were in a flutter within the development the director was resigning.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • the motion made by flapping up and down
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • the movement produced by flapping down and up
    • Chiefly British A small bet; a gamble: "If they like a flutter, Rick will get them better odds than the bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • the act of moving to and fro
    • A commotion; a stir.
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • abnormally rapid beating associated with auricles associated with heart (especially in a normal rhythm); can result in heart block
    • the act of moving forward and backward
    • Pathology Abnormally quick pulsation, especially associated with the atria or ventricles for the heart.
    • uncommonly fast beating of this auricles associated with the heart (especially in a frequent rhythm); can lead to heart block
    • a situation of agitation.
    • fast fluctuation in pitch of an audio reproduction resulting from variants when you look at the speed associated with recording or reproducing equipment.
    • uncommonly quick beating of auricles associated with heart (especially in a frequent rhythm); may result in heart block
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • Chiefly British A small bet; a gamble: "If they like a flutter, Rick will get them better odds than the bookies” ( John le Carré).
    • The work of fluttering.
    • An abnormal rapid pulsation associated with the heart.
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • a situation of agitation.
    • fast and unusual movement, by wings; fast vibration, undulation, or pulsation: since, the flutter of a fan or of heart.
    • a little bet or high-risk financial investment.
    • An abnormal rapid pulsation of heart.
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • Agitation; confusion; confused or excited experience or action.
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • A small bet or dangerous financial investment.
    • The work of fluttering; fast and unusual movement; vibration.
    • The work of fluttering.
    • Hurry; tumult; agitation of this brain; confusion; condition.
    • A flow of mingled water and steam through the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This occurs in locomotives whenever boiler primes, or works liquid to the cylinders.
    • circumstances of agitation.
    • The act of fluttering; fast and unusual movement; vibration.
    • rush; tumult; agitation associated with brain; confusion; condition.
    • the motion made by flapping up and down
    • the work of moving back and forth
    • uncommonly quick beating associated with the auricles of heart (especially in a regular rhythm); can result in heart block
    • fast and irregular movement, by wings; rapid vibration, undulation, or pulsation: since, the flutter of an admirer or of heart.
    • An abnormal fast pulsation associated with the heart.
    • Agitation; confusion; perplexed or excited experience or action.
    • Quick and irregular movement, since wings; quick vibration, undulation, or pulsation: since, the flutter of a fan or for the heart.
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • A flow of mingled liquid and vapor from the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This does occur in locomotives whenever boiler primes, or works water to the cylinders.
    • a tiny bet or risky investment.
    • Agitation; confusion; perplexed or excited feeling or action.
    • The work of fluttering; fast and unusual movement; vibration.
    • the movement produced by flapping along
    • rush; tumult; agitation of head; confusion; condition.
    • the work of moving forward and backward
    • unusually quick beating of this auricles regarding the heart (especially in a typical rhythm); can lead to heart block
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • A flow of mingled water and steam from gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This does occur in locomotives as soon as the boiler primes, or works liquid to the cylinders.
    • the movement created by flapping up and down
    • the act of going backwards and forwards
    • uncommonly fast beating associated with the auricles for the heart (especially in a frequent rhythm); may result in heart block
    • fast and unusual motion, as of wings; rapid vibration, undulation, or pulsation: since, the flutter of a fan or of this heart.
    • Agitation; confusion; perplexed or excited sensation or action.
    • A flow of mingled water and vapor from the gage-cocks of a steam-boiler. This does occur in locomotives if the boiler primes, or works water to the cylinders.
    • the motion made by flapping up and down
    • the work of going to and fro
    • unusually fast beating of the auricles regarding the heart (especially in a normal rhythm); can result in heart block
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
    • a disorderly outburst or tumult
  • verb:
    • To flap or wave rapidly but irregularly.
    • Of a winged pet: to flap the wings without flying; to travel with a light flapping regarding the wings.
    • To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
    • resulting in anything to flap.
    • Of a winged animal: to flap the wings without flying; to fly with a light flapping of wings.
    • To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
    • resulting in something to flap.
    • Of a winged pet: to flap the wings without flying; to fly with a light flapping of this wings.
    • To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
    • Of a winged animal: to flap the wings without flying; to travel with a light flapping of the wings.
    • To cause something to flap.
    • To flap or wave rapidly but irregularly.
    • resulting in one thing to flap.
    • Of a winged pet: to flap the wings without traveling; to travel with a light flapping of wings.
    • To flap or wave rapidly but irregularly.
    • To cause anything to flap.
    • Of a winged pet: to flap the wings without traveling; to fly with a light flapping of this wings.
    • resulting in one thing to flap.
    • To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
    • To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
    • Of a winged animal: to flap the wings without traveling; to travel with a light flapping for the wings.
    • resulting in some thing to flap.
    • Of a winged pet: to flap the wings without traveling; to fly with a light flapping of wings.
    • To cause some thing to flap.
    • wink shortly
    • move along quickly and gently; skim or dart
    • To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
    • Of a winged animal: to flap the wings without traveling; to fly with a light flapping of this wings.
    • flap the wings rapidly or travel with flapping movements
    • To cause some thing to flap.
    • wink quickly
    • beat quickly
    • move along rapidly and gently; skim or dart
    • wink briefly
    • move back-and-forth extremely quickly
    • move along rapidly and gently; skim or dart
    • wink quickly
    • move along rapidly and gently; skim or dart
    • wink shortly
    • move along quickly and softly; skim or dart
    • wink quickly
    • flap the wings quickly or travel with flapping movements
    • To flap or wave rapidly but irregularly.
    • flap the wings rapidly or fly with flapping motions
    • wink quickly
    • move along quickly and lightly; skim or dart
    • flap the wings rapidly or travel with flapping moves
    • wink quickly
    • Of a winged animal: to flap the wings without traveling; to travel with a light flapping regarding the wings.
    • overcome rapidly
    • beat quickly
    • move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
    • move back-and-forth very rapidly
    • resulting in some thing to flap.
    • beat rapidly
    • move forward and backward really rapidly
    • flap the wings quickly or travel with flapping motions
    • move along quickly and lightly; skim or dart
    • move to and fro really quickly
    • flap the wings rapidly or fly with flapping motions
    • beat rapidly
    • To flap or wave quickly but irregularly.
    • flap the wings quickly or fly with flapping motions
    • overcome rapidly
    • Of a winged pet: to flap the wings without traveling; to fly with a light flapping regarding the wings.
    • flap the wings quickly or fly with flapping motions
    • move back-and-forth extremely rapidly
    • move to and fro extremely quickly
    • resulting in anything to flap.
    • overcome quickly
    • beat quickly
    • move back-and-forth very rapidly
    • move back-and-forth very quickly
    • To flap or wave rapidly but irregularly.
    • Of a winged pet: to flap the wings without flying; to fly with a light flapping of this wings.
    • To cause one thing to flap.
    • wink briefly
    • move along quickly and softly; skim or dart
    • flap the wings quickly or fly with flapping movements
    • beat quickly
    • move back and forth extremely quickly
    • wink briefly
    • move along rapidly and softly; skim or dart
    • flap the wings quickly or travel with flapping movements
    • beat quickly
    • move back and forth very quickly
    • wink shortly
    • move along quickly and gently; skim or dart
    • flap the wings rapidly or fly with flapping movements
    • beat rapidly
    • wink briefly
    • move along rapidly and gently; skim or dart
    • flap the wings quickly or fly with flapping motions
    • overcome quickly
    • move back-and-forth very quickly
    • move back-and-forth extremely rapidly
  • others:
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • To move along or even and fro in quick unusual movements; vibrate, throb, or move about rapidly or variably; hover or waver in quick movement.
    • to maneuver up-and-down or even and fro in quick unusual motions; vibrate, throb, or move about rapidly or variably; hover or waver in quick motion.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • to stay agitation; fluctuate in experience; take doubt; wait the total amount.
    • to go up and down or to and fro in quick unusual movements; vibrate, throb, or go about rapidly or variably; hover or waver in quick motion.
    • to maneuver down and up or even to and fro in fast unusual motions; vibrate, throb, or move about rapidly or variably; hover or waver in fast motion.
    • is frivolous or foppish; have fun with the element of a beau of the duration; fly from 1 thing to another.
    • To be in agitation; fluctuate in sensation; be in anxiety; wait the total amount.
    • to stay agitation; fluctuate in feeling; take uncertainty; hang on the total amount.
    • to stay agitation; fluctuate in feeling; take doubt; hold on the total amount.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • To be frivolous or foppish; play the part of a beau for the duration; fly in one thing to some other.
    • become frivolous or foppish; play the element of a beau of this duration; fly from a single thing to another.
    • to maneuver along or even to and fro in quick unusual motions; vibrate, throb, or move about quickly or variably; hover or waver in quick motion.
    • to go in quick irregular movements; agitate; vibrate: as, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • to go in quick unusual movements; agitate; vibrate: as, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • To be in agitation; fluctuate in sensation; maintain anxiety; hold on the balance.
    • resulting in to flutter; condition; place into confusion.
    • resulting in to flutter; disorder; place into confusion.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • to go in quick unusual motions; agitate; vibrate: as, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • become frivolous or foppish; have fun with the element of a beau associated with the period; fly from a single thing to some other.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • to maneuver up-and-down or even and fro in quick unusual motions; vibrate, throb, or move about quickly or variably; hover or waver in fast motion.
    • to-be frivolous or foppish; have fun with the section of a beau of this period; fly from thing to some other.
    • to go along or even and fro in quick unusual motions; vibrate, throb, or move about quickly or variably; hover or waver in quick movement.
    • To be in agitation; fluctuate in sensation; be in anxiety; wait the total amount.
    • To move in fast unusual motions; agitate; vibrate: because, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • To cause to flutter; condition; place into confusion.
    • to go in fast irregular movements; agitate; vibrate: since, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • to stay agitation; fluctuate in sensation; maintain doubt; wait the total amount.
    • To cause to flutter; condition; throw into confusion.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • becoming frivolous or foppish; have fun with the part of a beau for the duration; fly from 1 thing to another.
    • To cause to flutter; condition; throw into confusion.
    • To be frivolous or foppish; have fun with the part of a beau of the duration; fly from 1 thing to a different.
    • to go in quick irregular motions; agitate; vibrate: since, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • to go up-and-down or even and fro in quick irregular motions; vibrate, throb, or move about quickly or variably; hover or waver in quick movement.
    • to stay in agitation; fluctuate in feeling; take uncertainty; hold on the total amount.
    • To cause to flutter; disorder; place into confusion.
    • becoming frivolous or foppish; play the element of a beau of this duration; fly from thing to a different.
    • to go in quick irregular movements; agitate; vibrate: because, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • resulting in to flutter; condition; throw into confusion.
    • To move in quick irregular movements; agitate; vibrate: as, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • resulting in to flutter; condition; place into confusion.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • to go up and down or even and fro in quick unusual movements; vibrate, throb, or move about quickly or variably; hover or waver in fast motion.
    • To be in agitation; fluctuate in experience; be in doubt; hang on the total amount.
    • To be frivolous or foppish; play the part of a beau for the duration; fly in one thing to another.
    • to go in quick unusual movements; agitate; vibrate: as, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • resulting in to flutter; disorder; place into confusion.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • to maneuver up and down or even and fro in fast irregular motions; vibrate, throb, or move about quickly or variably; hover or waver in fast movement.
    • to stay agitation; fluctuate in experience; maintain uncertainty; wait the balance.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • To be frivolous or foppish; have fun with the element of a beau for the duration; fly from thing to some other.
    • to go up and down or even to and fro in quick irregular motions; vibrate, throb, or move about rapidly or variably; hover or waver in fast movement.
    • to go in fast irregular movements; agitate; vibrate: since, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • to stay agitation; fluctuate in feeling; maintain doubt; wait the total amount.
    • to-be frivolous or foppish; have fun with the section of a beau of this period; fly from 1 thing to some other.
    • resulting in to flutter; condition; throw into confusion.
    • To move in quick irregular motions; agitate; vibrate: as, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • resulting in to flutter; disorder; place into confusion.
    • To float; undulate; fluctuate.
    • to go up and down or even to and fro in fast irregular movements; vibrate, throb, or move about quickly or variably; hover or waver in fast movement.
    • to stay in agitation; fluctuate in feeling; be in doubt; hold on the total amount.
    • to-be frivolous or foppish; play the section of a beau regarding the period; fly from a single thing to another.
    • to go in quick irregular motions; agitate; vibrate: since, a bird fluttering its wings.
    • To cause to flutter; disorder; place into confusion.

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