flute definition

  • noun:
    • Music A high-pitched woodwind instrument composed of a slender pipe closed at one end with keys and little finger holes on the side and an opening nearby the closed-end across that the breathing is blown. Also known as transverse flute.
    • Music any one of various comparable reedless woodwind instruments, for instance the recorder.
    • Music An organ stop whose flue pipeline creates a flutelike tone.
    • Architecture an extended, generally rounded groove incised as a decorative motif on shaft of a column, including.
    • an equivalent groove or furrow, as in a pleated ruffle of cloth or on an item of furniture.
    • A tall slim wineglass, often used for wine.
    • A woodwind instrument consisting of a metal, timber or bamboo tube with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole in side of 1 end or through a narrow station at one end against a sharp side, while addressing nothing, some or all holes with all the fingers to alter the note played.
    • A glass with a long, thin bowl and a lengthy stem, utilized for consuming wine, specially champagne.
    • A helical groove increasing a drill little bit allowing the drilled out product in the future up out of the gap because it's drilled.
    • A semicylindrical straight groove in a pillar, or the same groove in a rifle barrel accustomed reduce the weight.
    • songs A high-pitched woodwind tool composed of a slender tube shut at one end with secrets and hand holes privately and an opening close to the closed end across that the breathing is blown. Also called transverse flute.
    • A musical wind-instrument, comprising a hollow cylinder or pipeline, with holes along its size, ended by the fingers or by tips that are established by the fingers. The current flute is closed within high end, and blown utilizing the lips at a lateral opening.
    • A channel of curved part; -- usually put on certainly one of a vertical series of these types of networks regularly decorate columns and pilasters in ancient design. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • an identical channel or groove manufactured in timber or any other product, esp. in plaited cloth, such as a female's ruffle.
    • a lengthy French breakfast roll.
    • an end in an organ, having a flutelike sound.
    • some sort of flyboat; a storeship.
    • In songs, a musical instrument associated with pipeline kind, where the tone is from the influence of a current of environment upon the side of a hole when you look at the part of a tube. See pipe, fife.
    • Specifically— In ancient music, a direct flute with a conical wooden tube having a varying number of finger-holes. Sometimes two tubes were attached to one mouthpiece.
    • In medieval music, one of a family group of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass types, all having conical wood pipes with several finger-holes. The current flageolet as well as the penny-whistle tend to be types regarding the treble sort.
    • In contemporary songs, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wooden or metal tube with holes controlled simply by levers, and achieving a-compass of about three octaves up from middle C: also known as the German flute. The change from the medieval direct flutes took place early in the eighteenth century. A design for orchestral use had been conceived by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute giving toues an octave greater than the standard flute.
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wooden pipes, having a flute-like tone, often of four-foot pitch.
    • In design, one of a number of curved furrows, frequently semicircular in program, of which each is divided from the next by a narrow fillet.
    • an identical groove in almost any product, as in a female's ruffle.
    • In ornamental art, a concave despair fairly lengthy as well as any form, the sides certainly not parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • some sort of lengthy, slim French roll.
    • A shuttle used in tapestry-weaving. A separate shuttle is employed per colour of which the woof is composed.
    • A tall and incredibly narrow wine-glass, utilized especially for sparkling wines. Also called flute-glass.
    • Music some of numerous comparable reedless woodwind tools, such as the recorder.
    • Music An organ end whoever flue pipeline creates a flutelike tone.
    • Architecture an extended, often rounded groove incised as a decorative theme in the shaft of a column, like.
    • A similar groove or furrow, like in a pleated ruffle of cloth or on some furniture.
    • A tall slim wineglass, usually utilized for champagne.
    • A woodwind tool comprising a metal, lumber or bamboo tube with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole inside part of just one end or through a narrow station at one end against a-sharp edge, while addressing none, some or most of the holes with all the fingers to vary the note played.
    • A glass with an extended, slim bowl and a long stem, used for drinking wine, particularly champagne.
    • A helical groove going up a drill little bit that allows the drilled out product to come up out of the hole as it's drilled.
    • A semicylindrical straight groove in a pillar, or an equivalent groove in a rifle barrel regularly reduce the extra weight.
    • A musical wind instrument, consisting of a hollow cylinder or pipeline, with holes along its length, stopped by the fingers or by keys that are exposed by the fingers. The present day flute is shut within higher end, and blown because of the lips at a lateral opening.
    • A channel of curved area; -- generally placed on among a vertical a number of these types of networks familiar with decorate articles and pilasters in traditional architecture. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • an equivalent station or groove produced in lumber or any other material, esp. in plaited cloth, as with a girl's ruffle.
    • an extended French breakfast roll.
    • A stop in an organ, having a flutelike sound.
    • a type of flyboat; a storeship.
    • an extended vessel or boat, with level ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and inflammation in the centre.
    • and also the variety of brands applied both to flutes correct and to fluty stops when you look at the organ is quite great. Hence the older direct flutes may called directly, à-bec, or beaked: they were produced in sizes, with different fundamental tones, and were after that distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute normally called traverse flute, flute douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. Into the modern orchestra, besides the standard flute in C, the smaller size, labeled as the octave or piccolo flute, is used; but in military groups a few types are located, because the terz or tierce flute, plus the 4th or quart flute, the fundamental shades that tend to be , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour had been an alto flute, its fundamental tone being A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone tend to be of two sorts, with ended or with available pipelines and that belong correctly to your stopped diapason in addition to open diapason classes correspondingly (see diapason). Unfortuitously, a lot of the names employed for these stops either don't have any fixed and recognized definition or tend to be solely fanciful.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with open material pipelines of narrow measure and acute tone.
    • In songs, a guitar associated with the pipeline sort, where tone is created by the impact of an ongoing of atmosphere upon the side of a hole in part of a tube. See pipe, fife.
    • a high-pitched woodwind instrument; a slender pipe shut at one end with hand holes on a single end and an opening near the closed-end across that your breath is blown
    • particularly— In old songs, a direct flute with a conical wooden pipe having a varying wide range of finger-holes. Often two tubes were attached to one mouthpiece.
    • In medieval music, among a household of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass types, all having conical wood pipes with a few finger-holes. The current flageolet as well as the penny whistle are derivatives regarding the treble type.
    • In modern songs, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wooden or metal pipe with holes controlled to some extent by levers, and having a-compass of approximately three octaves up from middle C: also called the German flute. The alteration from the medieval direct flutes were held early in the eighteenth century. Top design for orchestral usage had been designed by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute providing toues an octave greater than the standard flute.
    • a groove or furrow in cloth etc (specifically a shallow concave groove in the shaft of a column)
    • a tall thin wineglass
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wood pipelines, having a flute-like tone, typically of four-foot pitch.
    • In architecture, certainly one of a series of curved furrows, usually semicircular in plan, of which each is separated from after that by a narrow fillet.
    • the same groove in virtually any material, such as a female's ruffle.
    • In attractive art, a concave depression relatively lengthy and of any form, the edges not parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • A kind of lengthy, thin French roll.
    • A shuttle utilized in tapestry-weaving. A separate shuttle is required for every colour of that the woof is made up.
    • A tall and very narrow wine-glass, utilized specifically for sparkling wines. Also referred to as flute-glass.
    • A long vessel or vessel, with flat ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and swelling at the center.
    • as well as the variety of brands used both to flutes proper and to fluty stops into the organ is quite great. Hence the older direct flutes are known as right, à-bec, or beaked: we were holding built in sizes, with different fundamental tones, and were after that distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute is also called traverse flute, flute douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. In modern-day orchestra, form standard flute in C, the smaller dimensions, labeled as the octave or piccolo flute, is used; in armed forces rings several varieties are found, since the terz or tierce flute, as well as the 4th or quart flute, the fundamental shades of which tend to be , and F correspondingly. The old flute d'armour ended up being an alto flute, its fundamental tone becoming A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone are of two types, with ended or with available pipelines and belonging precisely on ended diapason additionally the open diapason courses correspondingly (see diapason). Sadly, all of the names useful for these stops either do not have fixed and recognized meaning or tend to be solely fanciful.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with open metal pipelines of narrow measure and acute tone.
    • a high-pitched woodwind tool; a slender tube shut at one end with little finger holes on a single end and an opening close to the closed-end across that the breath is blown
    • a groove or furrow in cloth etc (particularly a shallow concave groove in the shaft of a column)
    • a tall thin wineglass
    • Music A high-pitched woodwind tool consisting of a slender pipe shut at one end with secrets and little finger holes quietly and an opening near the closed-end across that the breath is blown. Also known as transverse flute.
    • songs any one of various comparable reedless woodwind devices, including the recorder.
    • songs An organ stop whose flue pipeline creates a flutelike tone.
    • Architecture A long, typically rounded groove incised as a decorative theme on shaft of a column, including.
    • A similar groove or furrow, like in a pleated ruffle of fabric or on some furniture.
    • A tall narrow wineglass, often useful for champagne.
    • A woodwind tool comprising a metal, lumber or bamboo tube with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole inside part of 1 end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp advantage, while addressing none, some or most of the holes utilizing the hands to alter the note played.
    • A glass with a long, slim bowl and an extended stem, employed for drinking wine, especially wine.
    • A helical groove increasing a drill bit makes it possible for the drilled out material to come up from the opening because's drilled.
    • A semicylindrical straight groove in a pillar, or an identical groove in a rifle barrel accustomed decrease the extra weight.
    • A musical wind instrument, consisting of a hollow cylinder or pipe, with holes along its length, ended because of the fingers or by secrets that are established because of the fingers. The modern flute is closed in the top end, and blown because of the mouth at a lateral hole.
    • A channel of curved part; -- usually placed on one of a vertical a number of such stations familiar with embellish articles and pilasters in classical structure. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • an equivalent station or groove made in timber or any other product, esp. in plaited fabric, as with a lady's ruffle.
    • an extended French breakfast roll.
    • an end in an organ, having a flutelike sound.
    • some sort of flyboat; a storeship.
    • In music, an instrument for the pipeline sort, where tone is made by the effect of a current of atmosphere upon the edge of a hole when you look at the side of a tube. See pipe, fife.
    • especially— In ancient music, an immediate flute with a conical wooden tube having a varying quantity of finger-holes. Often two pipes were attached to one mouthpiece.
    • In medieval songs, certainly one of a family of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass types, all having conical wooden tubes with several finger-holes. The present day flageolet additionally the penny whistle are derivatives of this treble sort.
    • In modern-day songs, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wood or metal tube with holes managed in part by levers, and achieving a-compass of about three octaves up from center C: also called the German flute. The change from the medieval direct flutes took place early in the eighteenth century. The most effective design for orchestral usage had been developed by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute providing toues an octave greater than the normal flute.
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wood pipelines, having a flute-like tone, usually of four-foot pitch.
    • In design, certainly one of some curved furrows, typically semicircular in program, that each is divided through the next by a narrow fillet.
    • an identical groove in virtually any material, such as a woman's ruffle.
    • In attractive art, a concave depression fairly lengthy as well as any form, the edges not always parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • A kind of lengthy, slim French roll.
    • A shuttle used in tapestry-weaving. An independent shuttle is required for every single colour of that the woof is made up.
    • A tall and incredibly slim wine-glass, made use of especially for gleaming wines. Also called flute-glass.
    • A long vessel or boat, with level ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and inflammation at the center.
    • and number of brands used both to flutes proper and to fluty stops into the organ is quite great. Therefore the older direct flutes are called straight, à-bec, or beaked: they certainly were made in different sizes, with different fundamental tones, and were then distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute can be known as traverse flute, flute-douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. Inside modern-day orchestra, aside from the standard flute in C, small dimensions, labeled as the octave or piccolo flute, can be used; however in armed forces rings several varieties are found, once the terz or tierce flute, while the fourth or quart flute, the essential shades which tend to be , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour ended up being an alto flute, its fundamental tone being A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone are of two sorts, with stopped or with available pipes and that belong properly to the stopped diapason in addition to available diapason classes respectively (see diapason). Unfortunately, the majority of the brands used for these stops either have no fixed and acknowledged meaning or tend to be purely fanciful.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with open steel pipes of thin measure and penetrating tone.
    • a high-pitched woodwind tool; a slender tube shut at one end with finger holes on one end and an opening nearby the closed end across which the air is blown
    • Music A high-pitched woodwind tool composed of a slender pipe shut at one end with secrets and little finger holes on the side and an opening nearby the closed end across that the breath is blown. Also known as transverse flute.
    • a groove or furrow in fabric etc (especially a shallow concave groove regarding shaft of a column)
    • Music some of numerous similar reedless woodwind tools, such as the recorder.
    • a tall thin wineglass
    • Music An organ stop whose flue pipe creates a flutelike tone.
    • Architecture an extended, often curved groove incised as a decorative theme on shaft of a column, for instance.
    • the same groove or furrow, as with a pleated ruffle of cloth or on a piece of furnishings.
    • A tall narrow wineglass, often employed for champagne.
    • A woodwind tool consisting of a metal, lumber or bamboo pipe with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole inside side of 1 end or through a narrow channel at one end against a-sharp advantage, while covering none, some or every one of the holes because of the hands to vary the note played.
    • A glass with a long, slim dish and an extended stem, useful for drinking wine, particularly wine.
    • A helical groove increasing a drill little bit enabling the drilled out product ahead up out of the hole because it's drilled.
    • A semicylindrical straight groove in a pillar, or an identical groove in a rifle barrel accustomed decrease the extra weight.
    • A musical wind-instrument, composed of a hollow cylinder or pipe, with holes along its size, stopped by the hands or by keys that are exposed by the hands. The modern flute is closed at high end, and blown with the lips at a lateral gap.
    • songs A high-pitched woodwind tool comprising a slender pipe shut at one end with keys and finger holes quietly and an opening near the closed end across that your breathing is blown. Also known as transverse flute.
    • A channel of curved area; -- typically put on certainly one of a vertical a number of these types of stations familiar with enhance articles and pilasters in ancient design. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • songs Any of numerous similar reedless woodwind devices, including the recorder.
    • the same channel or groove made in lumber or any other material, esp. in plaited fabric, like in a lady's ruffle.
    • songs An organ stop whose flue pipeline produces a flutelike tone.
    • an extended French breakfast roll.
    • an end in an organ, having a flutelike sound.
    • Architecture a lengthy, typically rounded groove incised as a decorative theme regarding shaft of a column, for example.
    • some sort of flyboat; a storeship.
    • an identical groove or furrow, as in a pleated ruffle of cloth or on a piece of furnishings.
    • A tall slim wineglass, frequently utilized for champagne.
    • A woodwind tool consisting of a metal, wood or bamboo pipe with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole in the part of just one end or through a narrow station at one end against a-sharp side, while covering not one, some or all of the holes with all the hands to alter the note played.
    • In songs, a guitar associated with pipe type, when the tone is created by the influence of a current of air upon the side of a hole within the part of a tube. See pipe, fife.
    • A glass with a long, slim dish and an extended stem, utilized for consuming wine, especially champagne.
    • A helical groove increasing a drill little bit that allows the drilled out product in the future up out of the opening whilst's drilled.
    • A semicylindrical vertical groove in a pillar, or the same groove in a rifle barrel used to decrease the extra weight.
    • songs A high-pitched woodwind instrument composed of a slender tube shut at one end with keys and hand holes privately and an opening nearby the closed end across that the air is blown. Also referred to as transverse flute.
    • Specifically— In ancient music, a direct flute with a conical wooden tube having a varying number of finger-holes. Sometimes two tubes were attached to one mouthpiece.
    • Music A high-pitched woodwind tool comprising a slender pipe shut at one end with secrets and finger holes privately and an opening nearby the closed-end across which the breathing is blown. Also known as transverse flute.
    • songs Any of numerous similar reedless woodwind instruments, including the recorder.
    • In medieval music, certainly one of a household of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass varieties, all having conical wood pipes with a number of finger-holes. The modern flageolet as well as the penny whistle are types for the treble sort.
    • songs A high-pitched woodwind instrument consisting of a slender pipe shut at one end with secrets and little finger holes quietly and an opening nearby the closed end across that the air is blown. Also referred to as transverse flute.
    • Music Any of various similar reedless woodwind devices, like the recorder.
    • Music An organ end whose flue pipeline creates a flutelike tone.
    • songs An organ end whose flue pipeline creates a flutelike tone.
    • Music A high-pitched woodwind instrument consisting of a slender tube shut at one end with keys and little finger holes on the side and an opening near the closed end across that your air is blown. Also called transverse flute.
    • In contemporary music, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wooden or metal tube with holes managed to some extent by levers, and having a-compass of about three octaves up from center C: also called the German flute. The change from medieval direct flutes took place early in the eighteenth century. The most effective model for orchestral use ended up being conceived by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute offering toues an octave higher than the ordinary flute.
    • songs any one of different similar reedless woodwind instruments, including the recorder.
    • songs A high-pitched woodwind tool composed of a slender tube closed at one end with keys and little finger holes on the side and an opening near the closed end across which the air is blown. Also known as transverse flute.
    • Music A high-pitched woodwind tool consisting of a slender tube closed at one end with keys and hand holes privately and an opening nearby the closed end across which the air is blown. Also called transverse flute.
    • songs A high-pitched woodwind instrument composed of a slender tube closed at one end with keys and little finger holes privately and an opening nearby the closed end across that the air is blown. Also called transverse flute.
    • songs some of various similar reedless woodwind devices, like the recorder.
    • Architecture A long, usually rounded groove incised as a decorative motif in the shaft of a column, for instance.
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wooden pipes, having a flute-like tone, typically of four-foot pitch.
    • songs Any of numerous comparable reedless woodwind instruments, for instance the recorder.
    • Music An organ end whoever flue pipeline produces a flutelike tone.
    • songs any one of numerous comparable reedless woodwind tools, like the recorder.
    • Music some of different similar reedless woodwind devices, like the recorder.
    • Music An organ stop whoever flue pipeline produces a flutelike tone.
    • In architecture, among a few curved furrows, often semicircular in program, of which each is divided through the next by a narrow fillet.
    • A similar groove or furrow, such as a pleated ruffle of fabric or on a piece of furnishings.
    • Architecture a lengthy, usually rounded groove incised as a decorative motif regarding shaft of a column, including.
    • A musical wind-instrument, comprising a hollow cylinder or pipeline, with holes along its size, stopped by the fingers or by tips which are exposed by the fingers. The modern flute is shut at the higher end, and blown with the lips at a lateral opening.
    • Music An organ stop whoever flue pipeline creates a flutelike tone.
    • Music An organ end whoever flue pipeline produces a flutelike tone.
    • Music An organ end whoever flue pipeline produces a flutelike tone.
    • Architecture A long, generally rounded groove incised as a decorative motif from the shaft of a column, for instance.
    • A tall thin wineglass, frequently employed for champagne.
    • the same groove in virtually any material, as in a lady's ruffle.
    • A channel of curved part; -- often placed on one of a vertical a number of these types of stations regularly embellish columns and pilasters in classical architecture. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • A similar groove or furrow, as in a pleated ruffle of cloth or on a bit of furniture.
    • Architecture A long, frequently rounded groove incised as a decorative theme regarding shaft of a column, as an example.
    • Architecture an extended, often curved groove incised as a decorative theme regarding shaft of a column, including.
    • the same groove or furrow, such as a pleated ruffle of cloth or on some furniture.
    • an identical station or groove manufactured in lumber or any other material, esp. in plaited fabric, like in a lady's ruffle.
    • In decorative art, a concave despair relatively long as well as any style, the sides not always parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • an identical groove or furrow, as with a pleated ruffle of cloth or on an item of furniture.
    • A tall thin wineglass, frequently utilized for champagne.
    • A similar groove or furrow, such as a pleated ruffle of fabric or on a bit of furniture.
    • Architecture A long, frequently curved groove incised as a decorative motif on shaft of a column, including.
    • a lengthy French break fast roll.
    • A tall thin wineglass, often utilized for wine.
    • A tall slim wineglass, often useful for champagne.
    • A tall thin wineglass, frequently utilized for wine.
    • Architecture an extended, usually rounded groove incised as a decorative motif from the shaft of a column, for example.
    • an equivalent groove or furrow, such as a pleated ruffle of cloth or on some furniture.
    • some sort of lengthy, thin French roll.
    • A similar groove or furrow, like in a pleated ruffle of fabric or on a bit of furniture.
    • an end in an organ, having a flutelike noise.
    • A shuttle found in tapestry-weaving. A separate shuttle is employed for every color of which the woof is made up.
    • A tall thin wineglass, often useful for wine.
    • A tall slim wineglass, often utilized for wine.
    • some sort of flyboat; a storeship.
    • A woodwind tool comprising a metal, wood or bamboo tube with a row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole inside part of just one end or through a narrow station at one end against a sharp side, while addressing none, some or all the holes using the fingers to alter the note played.
    • In music, an instrument regarding the pipeline type, when the tone is produced by the effect of a current of atmosphere upon the side of a hole into the side of a tube. See pipeline, fife.
    • A woodwind instrument comprising a metal, lumber or bamboo pipe with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole inside side of 1 end or through a narrow station at one end against a sharp edge, while covering not one, some or every one of the holes utilizing the fingers to alter the note played.
    • A woodwind tool consisting of a metal, wood or bamboo pipe with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole when you look at the side of just one end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp edge, while addressing not one, some or all of the holes using the fingers to alter the note played.
    • A glass with a long, slim dish and a lengthy stem, utilized for consuming wine, specifically champagne.
    • A glass with a long, narrow bowl and a long stem, utilized for consuming wine, specifically champagne.
    • A glass with a long, slim bowl and a long stem, useful for consuming wine, especially champagne.
    • Specifically— In ancient music, a direct flute with a conical wooden tube having a varying number of finger-holes. Sometimes two tubes were attached to one mouthpiece.
    • A woodwind instrument consisting of a metal, timber or bamboo pipe with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole when you look at the part of just one end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp side, while covering not one, some or most of the holes using fingers to alter the note played.
    • A helical groove going up a drill bit allowing the drilled out material to come up out of the gap since it's drilled.
    • A helical groove rising a drill bit that allows the drilled out material ahead up out of the gap whilst's drilled.
    • In medieval songs, among a family of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass types, all having conical wood tubes with a few finger-holes. The modern flageolet and penny whistle are derivatives associated with the treble sort.
    • A semicylindrical vertical groove in a pillar, or the same groove in a rifle barrel used to decrease the weight.
    • A glass with a long, slim dish and a lengthy stem, employed for consuming wine, especially wine.
    • A woodwind tool composed of a metal, lumber or bamboo tube with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole in the side of one end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp advantage, while addressing not one, some or every one of the holes aided by the fingers to alter the note played.
    • A helical groove increasing a drill little bit enabling the drilled out material ahead up from the gap whilst's drilled.
    • In contemporary music, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wood or metal tube with holes managed in part by levers, and having a compass of approximately three octaves upward from middle C: also known as the German flute. The change from medieval direct flutes were held at the beginning of the eighteenth century. A design for orchestral usage had been created by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute offering toues an octave higher than the standard flute.
    • A semicylindrical straight groove in a pillar, or a similar groove in a rifle barrel always decrease the weight.
    • A glass with a long, slim bowl and a lengthy stem, useful for drinking wine, specifically champagne.
    • A helical groove rising a drill bit which allows the drilled out product ahead up out from the gap as it's drilled.
    • A semicylindrical straight groove in a pillar, or a similar groove in a rifle barrel regularly cut down the weight.
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wood pipes, having a flute-like tone, usually of four-foot pitch.
    • A helical groove increasing a drill little bit allowing the drilled out material ahead up out from the gap as it's drilled.
    • A semicylindrical straight groove in a pillar, or an identical groove in a rifle barrel always cut-down the extra weight.
    • In design, certainly one of a few curved furrows, usually semicircular in plan, which each is divided from after that by a narrow fillet.
    • A semicylindrical straight groove in a pillar, or an identical groove in a rifle barrel used to cut-down the weight.
    • A tall and incredibly narrow wine-glass, made use of specifically for sparkling wines. Also called flute-glass.
    • an identical groove in virtually any material, such as a lady's ruffle.
    • In attractive art, a concave despair reasonably lengthy and of any style, the sides not necessarily parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • A musical wind-instrument, comprising a hollow cylinder or pipe, with holes along its size, ended because of the fingers or by secrets that are exposed because of the hands. The present day flute is shut within high end, and blown using the lips at a lateral gap.
    • A woodwind instrument consisting of a metal, timber or bamboo pipe with a row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole within the part of just one end or through a narrow station at one end against a sharp edge, while addressing nothing, some or all of the holes with the hands to alter the note played.
    • some sort of lengthy, thin French roll.
    • A musical wind instrument, consisting of a hollow cylinder or pipeline, with holes along its length, ended by the fingers or by secrets which are established because of the hands. The modern flute is closed at top end, and blown using lips at a lateral hole.
    • a music wind instrument, comprising a hollow cylinder or pipeline, with holes along its length, stopped because of the hands or by keys that are opened because of the hands. The modern flute is closed in the higher end, and blown because of the mouth at a lateral gap.
    • A channel of curved area; -- frequently put on certainly one of a vertical group of these types of networks regularly enhance columns and pilasters in ancient structure. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • A glass with a long, thin dish and an extended stem, used for consuming wine, particularly champagne.
    • an identical channel or groove made in lumber or other product, esp. in plaited fabric, as with a girl's ruffle.
    • A channel of curved section; -- usually applied to certainly one of a vertical variety of such channels accustomed embellish articles and pilasters in classical structure. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • A helical groove going up a drill bit which allows the drilled out product ahead up out from the gap because's drilled.
    • A channel of curved area; -- frequently applied to among a vertical group of these types of networks always enhance articles and pilasters in traditional structure. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • A musical wind-instrument, consisting of a hollow cylinder or pipe, with holes along its size, ended by the fingers or by secrets that are opened by the fingers. The modern flute is closed in the upper end, and blown aided by the lips at a lateral hole.
    • A semicylindrical vertical groove in a pillar, or an equivalent groove in a rifle barrel familiar with decrease the extra weight.
    • A similar channel or groove manufactured in wood or other product, esp. in plaited cloth, as with a female's ruffle.
    • A channel of curved area; -- often applied to one of a vertical series of these types of stations accustomed embellish columns and pilasters in ancient architecture. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • A shuttle found in tapestry-weaving. A separate shuttle is utilized for each color of that your woof consists.
    • A musical wind instrument, comprising a hollow cylinder or pipe, with holes along its length, stopped because of the hands or by tips that are exposed because of the hands. The present day flute is shut during the top end, and blown with the mouth at a lateral opening.
    • A woodwind instrument composed of a metal, wood or bamboo pipe with a-row of circular holes and played by blowing across a hole in the side of 1 end or through a narrow channel at one end against a sharp advantage, while addressing nothing, some or all of the holes using fingers to alter the note played.
    • an equivalent station or groove made in timber or any other product, esp. in plaited fabric, like in a female's ruffle.
    • a lengthy French breakfast roll.
    • a lengthy vessel or boat, with level ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and inflammation in the middle.
    • the same station or groove made in timber or other material, esp. in plaited fabric, such as a girl's ruffle.
    • an extended French break fast roll.
    • A channel of curved area; -- typically put on one of a vertical number of these types of networks used to embellish columns and pilasters in ancient architecture. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • A glass with a long, narrow dish and a lengthy stem, useful for drinking wine, particularly champagne.
    • an end in an organ, having a flutelike noise.
    • an extended French breakfast roll.
    • an end in an organ, having a flutelike noise.
    • and The variety of names applied both to flutes proper and to fluty stops in the organ is very great. Thus the older direct flutes are also called straight, à-bec, or beaked: these were made in different sizes, with different fundamental tones, and were then distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute is also called traverse flute, flute douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. In the modern orchestra, besides the standard flute in C, the smaller size, called the octave or piccolo flute, is used; but in military bands several varieties are found, as the terz or tierce flute, and the fourth or quart flute, the fundamental tones of which are , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour was an alto flute, its fundamental tone being A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone are of two kinds, with stopped or with open pipes and belonging properly to the stopped diapason and the open diapason classes respectively (see diapason). Unfortunately, most of the names used for these stops either have no fixed and recognized meaning or are purely fanciful.
    • a type of flyboat; a storeship.
    • an identical station or groove built in wood or any other material, esp. in plaited cloth, such as a girl's ruffle.
    • A stop in an organ, having a flutelike noise.
    • some sort of flyboat; a storeship.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with available metal pipelines of narrow measure and penetrating tone.
    • A long French break fast roll.
    • a type of flyboat; a storeship.
    • a high-pitched woodwind instrument; a slender tube closed at one end with little finger holes using one end and an opening near the closed end across which the breath is blown
    • A musical wind instrument, comprising a hollow cylinder or pipe, with holes along its size, ended because of the fingers or by keys that are established by the hands. The present day flute is closed at top end, and blown aided by the lips at a lateral hole.
    • A channel of curved section; -- usually put on one of a vertical a number of these types of networks regularly enhance articles and pilasters in traditional architecture. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • In songs, an instrument for the pipe sort, when the tone is made by the effect of a current of atmosphere upon the side of a hole in the part of a tube. See pipeline, fife.
    • an equivalent station or groove built in lumber or other product, esp. in plaited cloth, as in a female's ruffle.
    • In music, an instrument of this pipeline kind, when the tone is created by the influence of a present of environment upon the edge of a hole when you look at the part of a tube. See pipeline, fife.
    • an extended French morning meal roll.
    • Specifically— In ancient music, a direct flute with a conical wooden tube having a varying number of finger-holes. Sometimes two tubes were attached to one mouthpiece.
    • A stop in an organ, having a flutelike sound.
    • In medieval songs, certainly one of a household of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass varieties, all having conical wooden tubes with a number of finger-holes. The present day flageolet as well as the penny-whistle are derivatives of the treble kind.
    • some sort of flyboat; a storeship.
    • In modern-day music, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wooden or metal tube with holes controlled simply by levers, and achieving a-compass of approximately three octaves upward from center C: also known as the German flute. The change through the medieval direct flutes were held early in the eighteenth century. Top model for orchestral usage had been created by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute giving toues an octave more than the normal flute.
    • A tall and extremely thin wine-glass, made use of particularly for sparkling wines. Also known as flute-glass.
    • a groove or furrow in cloth etc (especially a shallow concave groove on the shaft of a column)
    • In music, a musical instrument associated with pipeline kind, where tone is produced by the effect of a current of environment upon the edge of a hole into the part of a tube. See pipeline, fife.
    • a tall slim wineglass
    • especially— In old music, a primary flute with a conical wooden tube having a varying amount of finger-holes. Occasionally two pipes had been attached with one mouthpiece.
    • In medieval music, certainly one of a family of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass varieties, all having conical wooden pipes with a few finger-holes. The modern flageolet and also the penny whistle tend to be derivatives of treble sort.
    • In contemporary songs, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wooden or metal pipe with holes controlled in part by levers, and having a compass of about three octaves upward from middle C: also referred to as the German flute. The alteration through the medieval direct flutes happened at the beginning of the eighteenth century. The most effective model for orchestral use ended up being created by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute providing toues an octave greater than the ordinary flute.
    • a lengthy vessel or watercraft, with flat ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and swelling in the middle.
    • In organ-building, a stop with stopped wooden pipelines, having a flute-like tone, frequently of four-foot pitch.
    • while the variety of brands applied both to flutes proper also to fluty stops when you look at the organ is extremely great. Thus the older direct flutes are known as right, à-bec, or beaked: we were holding made in sizes, with different fundamental shades, and were after that distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute can be known as traverse flute, flute douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. In contemporary orchestra, form standard flute in C, small dimensions, called the octave or piccolo flute, is employed; but in armed forces rings a number of types are observed, as the terz or tierce flute, as well as the 4th or quart flute, the essential shades that tend to be , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour was an alto flute, its fundamental tone being A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone tend to be of two sorts, with stopped or with open pipelines and that belong correctly towards ended diapason together with open diapason courses respectively (see diapason). Unfortunately, a lot of the brands employed for these stops either don't have any fixed and recognized meaning or are purely fanciful.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with available steel pipes of thin measure and acute tone.
    • a high-pitched woodwind instrument; a slender tube shut at one end with finger holes using one end and an opening nearby the closed-end across that your breathing is blown
    • In structure, among a series of curved furrows, generally semicircular in program, which each is separated from the after that by a narrow fillet.
    • A stop in an organ, having a flutelike noise.
    • a lengthy French break fast roll.
    • A helical groove going up a drill little bit enabling the drilled out product in the future up out of the hole whilst's drilled.
    • particularly— In old music, a direct flute with a conical wooden pipe having a varying few finger-holes. Often two tubes were attached with one mouthpiece.
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wood pipelines, having a flute-like tone, typically of four-foot pitch.
    • A semicylindrical vertical groove in a pillar, or the same groove in a rifle barrel familiar with cut down the weight.
    • an equivalent groove in just about any product, as with a woman's ruffle.
    • an end in an organ, having a flutelike sound.
    • a groove or furrow in fabric etc (specially a shallow concave groove from the shaft of a column)
    • A kind of flyboat; a storeship.
    • In attractive art, a concave depression relatively long and of any form, the edges not parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • In design, one of a series of curved furrows, frequently semicircular in plan, of which each is separated through the after that by a narrow fillet.
    • In medieval songs, certainly one of a family group of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass types, all having conical wood tubes with a number of finger-holes. The modern flageolet therefore the penny whistle tend to be types for the treble type.
    • some sort of flyboat; a storeship.
    • a tall slim wineglass
    • a type of long, slim French roll.
    • an identical groove in virtually any product, as in a female's ruffle.
    • In modern-day songs, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wood or metal pipe with holes controlled in part by levers, and having a-compass of approximately three octaves up from center C: also known as the German flute. The alteration from medieval direct flutes took place early in the eighteenth century. The best model for orchestral usage had been invented by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute giving toues an octave higher than the normal flute.
    • A shuttle utilized in tapestry-weaving. A different shuttle is required for each colour of that your woof is made up.
    • In organ-building, a stop with stopped wooden pipes, having a flute-like tone, generally of four-foot pitch.
    • In songs, an instrument of the pipeline sort, where tone is generated by the influence of a present of environment upon the side of a hole when you look at the part of a tube. See pipe, fife.
    • In ornamental art, a concave depression fairly lengthy and of any form, the sides definitely not parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • A tall and extremely slim wine-glass, used particularly for sparkling wines. Also called flute-glass.
    • In music, a musical instrument associated with pipeline kind, when the tone is created by the effect of a current of environment upon the side of a hole inside side of a tube. See pipeline, fife.
    • A kind of long, slim French roll.
    • In structure, among a number of curved furrows, frequently semicircular in plan, that each is separated from next by a narrow fillet.
    • particularly— In ancient songs, a primary flute with a conical wood pipe having a varying number of finger-holes. Sometimes two tubes were attached to one mouthpiece.
    • an equivalent groove in almost any material, as in a female's ruffle.
    • A shuttle utilized in tapestry-weaving. A different shuttle is utilized for each color of that the woof consists.
    • particularly— In ancient songs, a primary flute with a conical wooden tube having a varying few finger-holes. Often two pipes had been mounted on one mouthpiece.
    • In medieval songs, among a family of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass varieties, all having conical wood pipes with a few finger-holes. The current flageolet therefore the penny-whistle are types associated with treble type.
    • A musical wind instrument, consisting of a hollow cylinder or pipeline, with holes along its length, ended because of the hands or by tips which are opened because of the fingers. The modern flute is shut during the top end, and blown with all the mouth at a lateral opening.
    • In medieval songs, one of a family of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass varieties, all having conical wood pipes with a number of finger-holes. The modern flageolet while the penny-whistle tend to be types of the treble kind.
    • In attractive art, a concave depression reasonably lengthy as well as any style, the sides certainly not parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • A tall and very thin wine-glass, used especially for sparkling wines. Also referred to as flute-glass.
    • A channel of curved section; -- frequently placed on one of a vertical a number of such stations always embellish articles and pilasters in classical structure. See Illust. under Base, n.
    • In contemporary songs, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wooden or metal tube with holes managed in part by levers, and achieving a-compass of about three octaves up from middle C: also referred to as the German flute. The change from medieval direct flutes took place early in the eighteenth century. The greatest model for orchestral use had been designed by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute providing toues an octave more than the ordinary flute.
    • some sort of lengthy, thin French roll.
    • In modern music, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wood or metal pipe with holes managed in part by levers, and achieving a-compass of approximately three octaves up from center C: also called the German flute. The change from medieval direct flutes were held at the beginning of the eighteenth century. The most effective design for orchestral usage ended up being designed by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute providing toues an octave more than the ordinary flute.
    • In organ-building, a stop with stopped wooden pipes, having a flute-like tone, usually of four-foot pitch.
    • an equivalent station or groove made in lumber or any other material, esp. in plaited fabric, such as a girl's ruffle.
    • In music, an instrument associated with the pipe sort, where tone is from the effect of a present of environment upon the side of a hole when you look at the side of a tube. See pipe, fife.
    • A shuttle utilized in tapestry-weaving. A different shuttle is employed for each colour of that your woof consists.
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wooden pipes, having a flute-like tone, typically of four-foot pitch.
    • a lengthy vessel or vessel, with level ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and inflammation in the middle.
    • A long French break fast roll.
    • In structure, one of some curved furrows, often semicircular in plan, which each is separated from after that by a narrow fillet.
    • especially— In ancient music, an immediate flute with a conical wood pipe having a varying amount of finger-holes. Occasionally two pipes had been attached to one mouthpiece.
    • plus the number of brands applied both to flutes correct and to fluty stops within the organ is quite great. Hence the older direct flutes may also be called straight, à-bec, or beaked: they were made in sizes, with various fundamental tones, and were then distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute can also be called traverse flute, flute-douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. Within the modern orchestra, besides the standard flute in C, small dimensions, labeled as the octave or piccolo flute, is employed; in army bands several varieties are observed, given that terz or tierce flute, as well as the 4th or quart flute, the fundamental tones which are , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour ended up being an alto flute, its fundamental tone becoming A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone are of two types, with ended or with open pipelines and belonging correctly towards stopped diapason and also the available diapason classes correspondingly (see diapason). Unfortunately, all of the names useful for these stops either haven't any fixed and acknowledged definition or are purely fanciful.
    • In structure, certainly one of some curved furrows, often semicircular in plan, which each is divided from the after that by a narrow fillet.
    • A tall and incredibly narrow wine-glass, used particularly for sparkling wines. Also called flute-glass.
    • an equivalent groove in virtually any product, as in a lady's ruffle.
    • In medieval music, among a family group of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass varieties, all having conical wooden tubes with a few finger-holes. The modern flageolet plus the penny-whistle tend to be types associated with the treble kind.
    • A stop in an organ, having a flutelike sound.
    • A long vessel or boat, with flat ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and swelling in the middle.
    • the same groove in any material, as with a lady's ruffle.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with available metal pipelines of slim measure and acute tone.
    • In modern songs, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wood or metal pipe with holes managed to some extent by levers, and achieving a compass of about three octaves up from center C: also known as the German flute. The change from medieval direct flutes were held at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Best design for orchestral use ended up being devised by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute giving toues an octave greater than the ordinary flute.
    • some sort of flyboat; a storeship.
    • In decorative art, a concave depression fairly lengthy and of any style, the sides not always parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • in addition to variety of names used both to flutes appropriate and also to fluty stops when you look at the organ is very great. Thus the older direct flutes are known as straight, à-bec, or beaked: they certainly were produced in different sizes, with various fundamental tones, and had been after that distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute can be known as traverse flute, flute-douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. In the modern orchestra, besides the standard flute in C, small size, labeled as the octave or piccolo flute, is used; in army groups a number of varieties are observed, as the terz or tierce flute, additionally the fourth or quart flute, the basic shades of which are , and F correspondingly. The old flute d'armour had been an alto flute, its fundamental tone becoming A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone are of two kinds, with ended or with open pipes and belonging properly towards the ended diapason therefore the open diapason classes respectively (see diapason). Sadly, all the names used for these stops either have no fixed and acknowledged definition or tend to be strictly fanciful.
    • In decorative art, a concave despair relatively lengthy as well as any form, the edges definitely not parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • a high-pitched woodwind tool; a slender pipe shut at one end with finger holes on a single end and an opening close to the closed-end across which the air is blown
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wood pipes, having a flute-like tone, generally of four-foot pitch.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with open material pipes of narrow measure and penetrating tone.
    • a type of lengthy, thin French roll.
    • a type of lengthy, thin French roll.
    • a groove or furrow in fabric etc (specifically a shallow concave groove regarding the shaft of a column)
    • A shuttle utilized in tapestry-weaving. A separate shuttle is utilized for every color of that the woof is made up.
    • a lengthy vessel or ship, with level ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and swelling at the center.
    • A shuttle utilized in tapestry-weaving. A separate shuttle is required for every colour of which the woof is composed.
    • a high-pitched woodwind tool; a slender pipe closed at one end with little finger holes on one end and an opening close to the closed-end across which the air is blown
    • A tall and incredibly slim wine-glass, made use of specifically for gleaming wines. Also known as flute-glass.
    • and The number of brands applied both to flutes appropriate and to fluty stops in the organ is extremely great. Therefore the older direct flutes may called straight, à-bec, or beaked: they were manufactured in sizes, with various fundamental tones, and had been after that distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute can be called traverse flute, flute-douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. When you look at the modern-day orchestra, form standard flute in C, the smaller size, called the octave or piccolo flute, is employed; in military groups a few varieties are found, since the terz or tierce flute, plus the 4th or quart flute, might shades which tend to be , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour was an alto flute, its fundamental tone becoming A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone tend to be of two sorts, with ended or with available pipelines and that belong correctly into the stopped diapason plus the open diapason courses correspondingly (see diapason). Unfortunately, almost all of the brands utilized for these stops either don't have any fixed and acknowledged definition or are strictly fanciful.
    • a tall narrow wineglass
    • In structure, certainly one of a few curved furrows, generally semicircular in plan, that each is separated from the after that by a narrow fillet.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with open material pipes of narrow measure and acute tone.
    • In songs, an instrument associated with the pipe kind, where the tone is generated by the influence of an ongoing of air upon the side of a hole in the part of a tube. See pipe, fife.
    • A similar groove in virtually any material, as with a lady's ruffle.
    • Specifically— In old songs, an immediate flute with a conical wooden pipe having a varying wide range of finger-holes. Sometimes two pipes were attached to one mouthpiece.
    • In ornamental art, a concave despair fairly lengthy and of any form, the edges not necessarily parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • a groove or furrow in fabric etc (especially a shallow concave groove regarding shaft of a column)
    • a high-pitched woodwind tool; a slender tube shut at one end with hand holes on one end and an opening near the closed-end across which the air is blown
    • A tall and very slim wine-glass, used specifically for gleaming wines. Also known as flute-glass.
    • a tall thin wineglass
    • some sort of lengthy, thin French roll.
    • In medieval music, certainly one of a family of direct flutes, comprising treble, alto, tenor, and bass varieties, all having conical wood pipes with a number of finger-holes. The modern flageolet in addition to penny whistle are types associated with the treble kind.
    • a groove or furrow in cloth etc (specially a shallow concave groove on the shaft of a column)
    • A shuttle found in tapestry-weaving. Another shuttle is employed for every color of that the woof is composed.
    • an extended vessel or ship, with level ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and swelling in the centre.
    • In modern music, a transverse flute, having a conical or cylindrical wood or metal pipe with holes managed to some extent by levers, and achieving a compass of about three octaves upward from center C: also known as the German flute. The alteration through the medieval direct flutes occurred early in the eighteenth century. A design for orchestral usage was created by Theobald Boehm in 1832. The piccolo-flute or piccolo is a flute providing toues an octave greater than the standard flute.
    • A tall and incredibly narrow wine-glass, used particularly for gleaming wines. Also called flute-glass.
    • a tall slim wineglass
    • while the selection of brands used both to flutes appropriate also to fluty stops in the organ is extremely great. Hence the older direct flutes will also be known as straight, à-bec, or beaked: these were manufactured in different sizes, with various fundamental tones, and were after that distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute normally known as traverse flute, flute-douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. When you look at the modern orchestra, besides the standard flute in C, small size, called the octave or piccolo flute, is employed; however in army bands a few types are located, while the terz or tierce flute, therefore the 4th or quart flute, the fundamental shades that are , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour ended up being an alto flute, its fundamental tone being A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone are of two types, with stopped or with available pipes and that belong properly into the ended diapason additionally the available diapason classes correspondingly (see diapason). Regrettably, a lot of the names utilized for these stops either haven't any fixed and acknowledged definition or tend to be purely fanciful.
    • In organ-building, an end with stopped wood pipelines, having a flute-like tone, generally of four-foot pitch.
    • a lengthy vessel or boat, with level ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and inflammation in the centre.
    • In architecture, among a number of curved furrows, frequently semicircular in program, of which each is divided from the next by a narrow fillet.
    • together with number of names used both to flutes correct and to fluty stops within the organ is extremely great. Thus the older direct flutes may known as directly, à-bec, or beaked: these were produced in sizes, with various fundamental tones, and had been then distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute can be called traverse flute, flute-douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. Within the modern-day orchestra, aside from the standard flute in C, small dimensions, labeled as the octave or piccolo flute, can be used; in armed forces groups several varieties are observed, due to the fact terz or tierce flute, and fourth or quart flute, the basic tones which are , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour ended up being an alto flute, its fundamental tone being A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone tend to be of two sorts, with ended or with available pipelines and that belong correctly toward ended diapason in addition to open diapason classes respectively (see diapason). Unfortunately, all of the names useful for these stops either haven't any fixed and recognized meaning or tend to be purely fanciful.
    • an equivalent groove in just about any material, as with a lady's ruffle.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with open material pipes of slim measure and penetrating tone.
    • In attractive art, a concave depression fairly lengthy and of any form, the sides not always parallel. Compare gadroon.
    • a lengthy vessel or ship, with flat ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and swelling at the center.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with open steel pipelines of thin measure and acute tone.
    • a high-pitched woodwind tool; a slender tube shut at one end with finger holes using one end and an opening near the closed-end across which the breathing is blown
    • plus the selection of names applied both to flutes proper also to fluty stops inside organ is very great. Therefore the older direct flutes may called directly, à-bec, or beaked: these were manufactured in sizes, with various fundamental shades, and were then distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute is also called traverse flute, flute-douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. Within the contemporary orchestra, form standard flute in C, the smaller dimensions, labeled as the octave or piccolo flute, is employed; however in military rings a few varieties are located, once the terz or tierce flute, while the fourth or quart flute, the fundamental tones of which tend to be , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour was an alto flute, its fundamental tone becoming A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone tend to be of two types, with ended or with open pipes and that belong properly towards the stopped diapason therefore the open diapason classes respectively (see diapason). Regrettably, all of the brands useful for these stops either don't have any fixed and acknowledged definition or tend to be strictly fanciful.
    • some sort of lengthy, thin French roll.
    • A shuttle found in tapestry-weaving. Another shuttle is employed per color of that the woof is made up.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with available metal pipes of narrow measure and acute tone.
    • a groove or furrow in cloth etc (specially a shallow concave groove on the shaft of a column)
    • a high-pitched woodwind instrument; a slender pipe closed at one end with little finger holes using one end and an opening near the closed-end across that the breath is blown
    • A tall and incredibly thin wine-glass, made use of specifically for sparkling wines. Also called flute-glass.
    • a tall narrow wineglass
    • A long vessel or vessel, with flat ribs or floor-timbers, round behind and inflammation in the middle.
    • and The variety of names applied both to flutes proper and to fluty stops in the organ is very great. Thus the older direct flutes are also called straight, à-bec, or beaked: these were made in different sizes, with different fundamental tones, and were then distinguished as discant, alto, tenor, and bass flutes. The transverse flute is also called traverse flute, flute douce, flauto traverse, flute traversière, German flute, cross-flute, etc. In the modern orchestra, besides the standard flute in C, the smaller size, called the octave or piccolo flute, is used; but in military bands several varieties are found, as the terz or tierce flute, and the fourth or quart flute, the fundamental tones of which are , and F respectively. The old flute d'armour was an alto flute, its fundamental tone being A. Organ-stops of a fluty tone are of two kinds, with stopped or with open pipes and belonging properly to the stopped diapason and the open diapason classes respectively (see diapason). Unfortunately, most of the names used for these stops either have no fixed and recognized meaning or are purely fanciful.
    • In organ-building, a flue-stop with available metal pipes of thin measure and acute tone.
    • a high-pitched woodwind instrument; a slender pipe shut at one end with hand holes on one end and an opening close to the closed end across which the breath is blown
    • a groove or furrow in cloth etc (specifically a shallow concave groove from the shaft of a column)
    • a high-pitched woodwind tool; a slender pipe closed at one end with hand holes on a single end and an opening near the closed-end across which the breath is blown
    • a groove or furrow in cloth etc (specifically a shallow concave groove regarding shaft of a column)
    • a groove or furrow in fabric etc (specially a shallow concave groove regarding shaft of a column)
    • a tall narrow wineglass
    • a tall narrow wineglass
    • a tall thin wineglass
  • verb-transitive:
    • Music To play (a tune) on a flute.
    • To produce in a flutelike tone.
    • to create flutes in (a column, including).
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with an obvious, soft note, that way of a flute.
    • to make flutes or stations in, like in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • musical to try out (a tune) on a flute.
    • To produce in a flutelike tone.
    • to produce flutes in (a column, including).
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with a clear, soft note, that way of a flute.
    • to create flutes or channels in, as in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • musical To play (a tune) on a flute.
    • To produce in a flutelike tone.
    • to produce flutes in (a column, as an example).
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with a clear, smooth note, that way of a flute.
    • to make flutes or channels in, as in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • musical to relax and play (a tune) on a flute.
    • To produce in a flutelike tone.
    • To make flutes in (a column, including).
    • Music to try out (a tune) on a flute.
    • to try out, whistle, or sing with a clear, smooth note, that way of a flute.
    • to create in a flutelike tone.
    • which will make flutes in (a column, for example).
    • To form flutes or stations in, as with a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • Music To play (a tune) on a flute.
    • Music to try out (a tune) on a flute.
    • to make in a flutelike tone.
    • musical To play (a tune) on a flute.
    • Music to relax and play (a tune) on a flute.
    • Music To play (a tune) on a flute.
    • To produce in a flutelike tone.
    • To produce in a flutelike tone.
    • to make in a flutelike tone.
    • to make in a flutelike tone.
    • musical to relax and play (a tune) on a flute.
    • to help make flutes in (a column, for example).
    • to create flutes in (a column, as an example).
    • to produce flutes in (a column, for example).
    • to produce flutes in (a column, including).
    • Music To play (a tune) on a flute.
    • To produce in a flutelike tone.
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with a clear, smooth note, like that of a flute.
    • to create in a flutelike tone.
    • which will make flutes in (a column, including).
    • to create flutes or networks in, as with a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • to create flutes in (a column, for example).
    • to produce flutes in (a column, for example).
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with a definite, smooth note, like this of a flute.
    • to try out, whistle, or sing with a clear, soft note, like this of a flute.
    • to create flutes or stations in, as in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • to make flutes or stations in, as in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • to try out, whistle, or sing with a definite, soft note, that way of a flute.
    • to create flutes or networks in, as in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with an obvious, smooth note, that way of a flute.
    • to create flutes or networks in, like in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with a clear, smooth note, like that of a flute.
    • To form flutes or stations in, as in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with a definite, soft note, that way of a flute.
    • To form flutes or stations in, like in a column, a ruffle, etc.
    • to relax and play, whistle, or sing with a definite, smooth note, that way of a flute.
    • to make flutes or stations in, such as a column, a ruffle, etc.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • musical To play a flute.
    • To sing, whistle, or consult with a flutelike tone.
    • to try out on, or as on, a flute; to create a flutelike sound.
    • musical to relax and play a flute.
    • To sing, whistle, or speak with a flutelike tone.
    • to relax and play in, or as on, a flute; to create a flutelike sound.
    • musical To play a flute.
    • To sing, whistle, or consult with a flutelike tone.
    • to relax and play in, or since on, a flute; which will make a flutelike sound.
    • musical to try out a flute.
    • To sing, whistle, or consult with a flutelike tone.
    • to relax and play in, or because on, a flute; to create a flutelike noise.
    • musical To play a flute.
    • To sing, whistle, or consult a flutelike tone.
    • to try out in, or because on, a flute; to create a flutelike noise.
    • musical to relax and play a flute.
    • Music to try out a flute.
    • Music To play a flute.
    • musical To play a flute.
    • To sing, whistle, or talk to a flutelike tone.
    • To sing, whistle, or speak with a flutelike tone.
    • To sing, whistle, or consult with a flutelike tone.
    • musical To play a flute.
    • Music to try out a flute.
    • To sing, whistle, or consult with a flutelike tone.
    • To sing, whistle, or talk to a flutelike tone.
    • musical to try out a flute.
    • To sing, whistle, or talk to a flutelike tone.
    • To sing, whistle, or consult a flutelike tone.
    • to relax and play in, or because on, a flute; in order to make a flutelike noise.
    • to try out on, or because on, a flute; to make a flutelike sound.
    • To play in, or because on, a flute; which will make a flutelike sound.
    • to relax and play on, or since on, a flute; which will make a flutelike sound.
    • to try out in, or because on, a flute; which will make a flutelike sound.
    • To play on, or because on, a flute; to make a flutelike sound.
    • to try out in, or because on, a flute; to help make a flutelike sound.
  • verb:
    • To play on a flute.
    • To make a flutelike sound.
    • To utter with a flutelike noise.
    • to make flutes or stations in (like in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to reduce a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
    • to relax and play on a flute.
    • which will make a flutelike sound.
    • To utter with a flutelike sound.
    • To form flutes or channels in (as in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical vertical groove in (such as a pillar, etc.).
    • kind flutes in
    • type flutes in
    • to try out on a flute.
    • to help make a flutelike noise.
    • To utter with a flutelike noise.
    • To form flutes or stations in (as with a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
    • type flutes in
    • To play on a flute.
    • which will make a flutelike sound.
    • To utter with a flutelike noise.
    • to create flutes or networks in (such as a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
    • to try out on a flute.
    • To make a flutelike sound.
    • To utter with a flutelike sound.
    • to create flutes or networks in (as with a column, a ruffle, etc.); to reduce a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
    • to relax and play on a flute.
    • To play on a flute.
    • to create a flutelike sound.
    • To play on a flute.
    • to produce a flutelike noise.
    • to relax and play on a flute.
    • To utter with a flutelike sound.
    • to produce a flutelike sound.
    • to produce a flutelike noise.
    • To utter with a flutelike sound.
    • To play on a flute.
    • to make flutes or stations in (as in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical straight groove in (like in a pillar, etc.).
    • To utter with a flutelike sound.
    • to make flutes or networks in (as in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to reduce a semicylindrical straight groove in (such as a pillar, etc.).
    • to make flutes or networks in (like in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
    • to create a flutelike sound.
    • To utter with a flutelike noise.
    • To utter with a flutelike sound.
    • To form flutes or networks in (like in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to reduce a semicylindrical vertical groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
    • To form flutes or stations in (such as a column, a ruffle, etc.); to cut a semicylindrical vertical groove in (like in a pillar, etc.).
    • To play on a flute.
    • to create a flutelike noise.
    • To utter with a flutelike noise.
    • to create flutes or channels in (like in a column, a ruffle, etc.); to reduce a semicylindrical straight groove in (such as a pillar, etc.).
    • kind flutes in
    • form flutes in
    • to try out on a flute.
    • to create a flutelike noise.
    • To utter with a flutelike noise.
    • To form flutes or stations in (as with a column, a ruffle, etc.); to reduce a semicylindrical straight groove in (as in a pillar, etc.).
    • type flutes in
    • form flutes in
    • type flutes in
    • form flutes in
    • kind flutes in
    • kind flutes in
    • type flutes in
  • others:
    • To play on a flute; produce a soft, obvious note like that of a flute.
    • To play or sing lightly and demonstrably in records resembling those of a flute.
    • To form flutes or grooves in, such as a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • to try out on a flute; create a soft, clear note like this of a flute.
    • To play or sing softly and obviously in records resembling those of a flute.
    • to create flutes or grooves in, such as a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • to try out on a flute; produce a soft, clear note like this of a flute.
    • to try out or sing softly and demonstrably in notes resembling those of a flute.
    • To form flutes or grooves in, such as a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • To play on a flute; produce a soft, clear note like that of a flute.
    • To play or sing softly and demonstrably in notes resembling those of a flute.
    • to create flutes or grooves in, as with a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • to try out on a flute; produce a soft, clear note like this of a flute.
    • To play or sing softly and plainly in notes resembling those of a flute.
    • to create flutes or grooves in, as in a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • To play on a flute; create a soft, obvious note that way of a flute.
    • to relax and play or sing lightly and clearly in notes resembling those of a flute.
    • to make flutes or grooves in, as with a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • to try out on a flute; create a soft, obvious note that way of a flute.
    • to try out or sing softly and obviously in notes resembling those of a flute.
    • to create flutes or grooves in, as in a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • To play on a flute; create a soft, clear note like that of a flute.
    • to relax and play or sing lightly and clearly in records resembling those of a flute.
    • To form flutes or grooves in, as in a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • to try out on a flute; create a soft, obvious note like this of a flute.
    • to relax and play or sing lightly and demonstrably in records resembling those of a flute.
    • to make flutes or grooves in, such as a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • to relax and play on a flute; produce a soft, clear note like this of a flute.
    • to relax and play or sing softly and plainly in notes resembling those of a flute.
    • To form flutes or grooves in, like in a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • to relax and play on a flute; create a soft, clear note like this of a flute.
    • To play or sing softly and clearly in notes resembling those of a flute.
    • to make flutes or grooves in, as in a ruffle. See gauffer.
    • To play on a flute; produce a soft, obvious note like that of a flute.
    • to relax and play or sing softly and clearly in records resembling those of a flute.
    • to create flutes or grooves in, as with a ruffle. See gauffer.

Related Sources

  • Sentence for "flute"
  • Quotes for "flute"
  • Cross Reference for "flute"
  • Etymologically Related for "flute"
  • Urban Dictionary for "flute"
    • "an enhanced pea-shooter with a variety…
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