fluorene definition

  • noun:
    • A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon comprising two benzene bands joined up with collectively directly, and also via a methylene connection; it is used in light-emitting diodes.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having an attractive violet fluorescence; whence its title. It happens when you look at the higher boiling services and products of coal-tar, and it is acquired unnaturally.
    • A polycyclic fragrant hydrocarbon comprising two benzene bands joined together right, and in addition via a methylene connection; it is found in light-emitting diodes.
    • A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composed of two benzene bands joined up with together directly, also via a methylene connection; it really is found in light-emitting diodes.
    • a great hydrocarbon, C13 H10, contained in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If you don't rather pure it offers a violet fluorescence. Also known as orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A polycyclic fragrant hydrocarbon composed of two benzene bands joined up with together straight, as well as via a methylene bridge; it really is found in light-emitting diodes.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a beautiful violet fluorescence; whence its name. It happens within the higher boiling services and products of coal-tar, and is acquired artificially.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a lovely violet fluorescence; whence its name. It happens in higher boiling products of coal tar, and it is obtained artificially.
    • a good hydrocarbon, C13 H10, found in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If you don't very pure it offers a violet fluorescence. Also called orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • a great hydrocarbon, C13 H10, found in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If you don't very pure it has a violet fluorescence. Also referred to as orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a beautiful violet fluorescence; whence its title. It takes place inside greater boiling products of coal tar, and it is acquired unnaturally.
    • a great hydrocarbon, C13 H10, contained in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If not quite pure it offers a violet fluorescence. Also called orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composed of two benzene rings joined up with collectively straight, and via a methylene connection; it is used in light-emitting diodes.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a lovely violet fluorescence; whence its title. It happens in greater boiling services and products of coal tar, and is obtained artificially.
    • A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon consisting of two benzene bands joined up with collectively straight, and also via a methylene connection; its utilized in light-emitting diodes.
    • A solid hydrocarbon, C13 H10, contained in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If not quite pure it has a violet fluorescence. Also called orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a beautiful violet fluorescence; whence its title. It happens into the greater boiling services and products of coal-tar, and is obtained artificially.
    • A solid hydrocarbon, C13 H10, contained in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If not quite pure it has a violet fluorescence. Also called orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A polycyclic fragrant hydrocarbon comprising two benzene bands joined up with together straight, and in addition via a methylene bridge; it's found in light-emitting diodes.
    • A polycyclic fragrant hydrocarbon composed of two benzene rings joined up with together right, and in addition via a methylene connection; it is found in light-emitting diodes.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a lovely violet fluorescence; whence its name. It occurs inside higher boiling services and products of coal-tar, and is gotten artificially.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having an attractive violet fluorescence; whence its name. It takes place when you look at the higher boiling services and products of coal-tar, and is obtained artificially.
    • A solid hydrocarbon, C13 H10, within portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If you don't very pure it's a violet fluorescence. Also known as orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A solid hydrocarbon, C13 H10, contained in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If not quite pure it has a violet fluorescence. Also called orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composed of two benzene bands joined collectively right, and in addition via a methylene connection; its utilized in light-emitting diodes.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having an attractive violet fluorescence; whence its name. It does occur when you look at the greater boiling products of coal tar, and is gotten artificially.
    • an excellent hydrocarbon, C13 H10, found in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If not quite pure it's a violet fluorescence. Also called orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composed of two benzene bands joined together straight, also via a methylene connection; it is used in light-emitting diodes.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a lovely violet fluorescence; whence its name. It takes place into the higher boiling products of coal tar, and it is acquired unnaturally.
    • A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composed of two benzene rings joined up with together straight, also via a methylene bridge; its found in light-emitting diodes.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a beautiful violet fluorescence; whence its title. It takes place inside higher boiling products of coal-tar, and it is obtained unnaturally.
    • an excellent hydrocarbon, C13 H10, contained in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If not quite pure it has a violet fluorescence. Also known as orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon comprising two benzene rings joined up with collectively directly, and in addition via a methylene bridge; its used in light-emitting diodes.
    • A solid hydrocarbon, C13 H10, contained in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. If not quite pure it has a violet fluorescence. Also called orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.
    • A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C13H10 having a beautiful violet fluorescence; whence its name. It occurs within the higher boiling products of coal-tar, and is acquired artificially.
    • a good hydrocarbon, C13 H10, found in portions of coal-tar boiling at 300–400° C. or even quite pure it's a violet fluorescence. Also known as orthodiphenylenemethane or 2,2′ -melhylenebiphenyl. It melts at 113° C.

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  • Sentence for "fluorene"
    • M.P. 273°-276° C., and yields fluorene
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