fluke definition

  • noun:
    • Any of numerous flatfishes, specially a flounder for the genus Paralichthys.
    • some of numerous flatfishes, specially a flounder associated with genus Paralichthys.
    • some of numerous flatfishes, specifically a flounder of this genus Paralichthys.
    • some of different flatfishes, specifically a flounder of the genus Paralichthys.
    • See trematode.
    • view trematode.
    • See trematode.
    • See trematode.
    • some of different flatfishes, particularly a flounder regarding the genus Paralichthys.
    • Nautical The triangular knife after an arm of an anchor, designed to capture into the ground.
    • Nautical The triangular knife at the end of an arm of an anchor, built to capture inside floor.
    • Nautical The triangular blade at the end of an arm of an anchor, designed to get in the floor.
    • See trematode.
    • A barb or barbed mind, because on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • A barb or barbed head, because on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • Nautical The triangular blade after an arm of an anchor, built to get into the surface.
    • A barb or barbed head, because on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • Either associated with the two horizontally flattened divisions for the tail of a whale.
    • Either associated with two horizontally flattened divisions regarding the end of a whale.
    • A barb or barbed mind, because on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • Either regarding the two horizontally flattened divisions of end of a whale.
    • A stroke of good fortune.
    • Either of the two horizontally flattened divisions regarding the tail of a whale.
    • A stroke of great chance.
    • A chance incident; any sort of accident.
    • A stroke of good chance.
    • an opportunity occurrence; an accident.
    • Games An accidentally great or successful stroke in billiards or pool.
    • an opportunity occurrence; any sort of accident.
    • Games An accidentally great or successful swing in billiards or pool.
    • A lucky or improbable event, using implication your occurrence cannot be duplicated.
    • Games An accidentally good or effective swing in billiards or pool.
    • A lucky or improbable incident, because of the implication the occurrence cannot be duplicated.
    • Nautical The triangular knife at the conclusion of an arm of an anchor, made to get in the floor.
    • A barb or barbed mind, since on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • A lucky or improbable incident, using the implication your occurrence couldn't be repeated.
    • Either for the two horizontally flattened divisions regarding the end of a whale.
    • A flounder.
    • A flounder.
    • A stroke of great fortune.
    • A stroke of great fortune.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm associated with Trematoda class, related to the tapeworm.
    • an opportunity event; a major accident.
    • A flounder.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm of this Trematoda class, about the tapeworm.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm for the Trematoda course, linked to the tapeworm.
    • Games An accidentally good or effective swing in billiards or share.
    • Either associated with the two lobes of a whale's or comparable creature's end.
    • Either associated with two lobes of a whale's or similar creature's end.
    • an opportunity occurrence; an accident.
    • Either of this two lobes of a whale's or similar animal's tail.
    • the triangular blades at the end of an anchor, designed to capture the floor.
    • some of the triangular blades at the conclusion of an anchor, designed to get the bottom.
    • the triangular blades at the conclusion of an anchor, built to catch the bottom.
    • A metal hook from the head of particular staff tools (including a bill), produced in numerous types based function, whether useful for grappling or to enter armour when swung at an opponent.
    • A metal hook in the head of particular staff weapons (such as for instance a bill), produced in numerous kinds based on purpose, whether used for grappling or even penetrate armour when swung at an opponent.
    • A lucky or improbable occurrence, utilizing the implication your event cannot be duplicated.
    • Games An accidentally good or effective swing in billiards or share.
    • generally, a winglike formation on a central piece.
    • generally, a winglike development on a central piece.
    • A lucky or improbable occurrence, using implication that the occurrence couldn't be duplicated.
    • A metal hook regarding mind of specific staff weapons (such as for example a bill), built in different forms dependent on purpose, whether useful for grappling or to enter armour when swung at an opponent.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • In general, a winglike development on a central piece.
    • Any United states flounder of this genus Paralichthys, specifically Paralicthys dentatus, found in the Atlantic Ocean as well as in adjacent bays.
    • Any US flounder of the genus Paralichthys, specially Paralicthys dentatus, found in the Atlantic Ocean as well as in adjacent bays.
    • any one of various flatfishes, specifically a flounder of this genus Paralichthys.
    • A flounder.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of several species, having an appartment, lanceolate body and two suckers. Two species (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are observed within the livers of sheep, and create the disease labeled as decay.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of a few species, having an appartment, lanceolate human body as well as 2 suckers. Two species (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are located inside livers of sheep, and produce the disease labeled as decompose.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm of this Trematoda course, about the tapeworm.
    • See trematode.
    • A flounder.
    • The section of an anchor which fastens inside surface; a flook. See anchor.
    • Any United states flounder for the genus Paralichthys, specifically Paralicthys dentatus, found in the Atlantic Ocean plus in adjacent bays.
    • Either regarding the two lobes of a whale's or comparable animal's end.
    • Nautical The triangular knife at the end of an arm of an anchor, made to catch in the floor.
    • The part of an anchor which fastens inside ground; a flook. See anchor.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm regarding the Trematoda course, associated with the tapeworm.
    • the lobes of a whale's tail, so-called through the resemblance toward fluke of an anchor.
    • Any of the triangular blades at the end of an anchor, designed to capture the floor.
    • among lobes of a whale's tail, so called from resemblance to your fluke of an anchor.
    • A barb or barbed mind, since on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • Either of two lobes of a whale's or comparable creature's tail.
    • An instrument for cleaning up a hole drilled in stone for blasting.
    • A metal hook regarding head of particular staff tools (particularly a bill), manufactured in numerous kinds dependent on function, whether useful for grappling or even to enter armour when swung at an opponent.
    • a guitar for cleaning up a hole drilled in stone for blasting.
    • Either of the two horizontally flattened divisions of the tail of a whale.
    • An accidental and favorable stroke at billiards (known as a scratch in the usa); for this reason, any accidental or unexpected benefit.
    • Any of the triangular blades at the conclusion of an anchor, designed to get the floor.
    • A stroke of great fortune.
    • An accidental and positive stroke at billiards (known as a scratch in the usa); thus, any accidental or unforeseen benefit.
    • In general, a winglike formation on a central piece.
    • A metal hook regarding head of certain staff tools (such as for example a bill), produced in different forms depending on function, whether used for grappling or even to enter armour whenever swung at an opponent.
    • an opportunity occurrence; an accident.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • The part of an anchor which captures inside ground. See anchor.
    • generally, a winglike development on a central piece.
    • The section of an anchor which grabs when you look at the surface. See anchor.
    • Games An accidentally great or successful swing in billiards or share.
    • Any American flounder of the genus Paralichthys, especially Paralicthys dentatus, found in the Atlantic Ocean and in adjacent bays.
    • one of many barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: called by English whalemen wither.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • One of the barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: called by English whalemen wither.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of a number of species, having a flat, lanceolate body as well as 2 suckers. Two species (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are observed when you look at the livers of sheep, and create the disease labeled as decay.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of several species, having an appartment, lanceolate body as well as 2 suckers. Two types (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are observed within the livers of sheep, and produce the disease called rot.
    • A lucky or improbable event, with all the implication that the occurrence couldn't be repeated.
    • Any United states flounder for the genus Paralichthys, especially Paralicthys dentatus, found in the Atlantic Ocean plus in adjacent bays.
    • Either half of the tail of a cetacean or sirenian: so named from the resemblance towards the fluke of an anchor.
    • some of numerous flatfishes, especially a flounder regarding the genus Paralichthys.
    • Either 50 % of the tail of a cetacean or sirenian: so called from the similarity toward fluke of an anchor.
    • The section of an anchor which fastens when you look at the ground; a flook. See anchor.
    • The part of an anchor which fastens in ground; a flook. See anchor.
    • See trematode.
    • In mining, a musical instrument regularly clean a hole earlier than billing it with powder for blasting.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of a number of types, having a-flat, lanceolate human body as well as 2 suckers. Two types (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are located inside livers of sheep, and create the disease labeled as decompose.
    • In mining, an instrument always cleanse a hole previous to recharging it with dust for blasting.
    • the lobes of a whale's tail, so called through the resemblance towards the fluke of an anchor.
    • the lobes of a whale's tail, so-called from the resemblance on fluke of an anchor.
    • An instrument for cleaning up a hole drilled in rock for blasting.
    • Nautical The triangular knife at the end of an arm of an anchor, designed to capture in the floor.
    • A flounder.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally successful stroke; the advantage gained when, playing for one thing, one gets another; hence, any unexpected or accidental advantage or turn; a chance; a scratch.
    • The element of an anchor which fastens inside ground; a flook. See anchor.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally effective swing; the advantage attained when, playing for starters, one gets another; therefore, any unforeseen or accidental benefit or turn; the possibility; a scratch.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm of Trematoda class, about the tapeworm.
    • An accidental and favorable stroke at billiards (known as a scratch in the usa); for this reason, any accidental or unanticipated advantage.
    • A barb or barbed head, since on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • Hence— to be refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance up to speed ship.
    • among lobes of a whale's tail, so called from resemblance to the fluke of an anchor.
    • a guitar for cleansing a hole drilled in rock for blasting.
    • thus— To become refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance on board ship.
    • Either of this two lobes of a whale's or similar animal's tail.
    • Either regarding the two horizontally flattened divisions of this tail of a whale.
    • ergo— To go to sleep; bunk or turn in.
    • For this reason— To go to sleep; bunk or turn-in.
    • a musical instrument for cleaning up a hole drilled in rock for blasting.
    • The section of an anchor which captures inside floor. See anchor.
    • Any of the triangular blades after an anchor, made to get the floor.
    • A stroke of great luck.
    • An accidental and positive stroke at billiards (known as a scratch in the United States); hence, any accidental or unanticipated advantage.
    • A metal hook regarding mind of specific staff tools (such a bill), manufactured in various forms according to function, whether employed for grappling or even to enter armour when swung at an opponent.
    • the barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: known as by English whalemen wither.
    • an opportunity occurrence; any sort of accident.
    • Either half the end of a cetacean or sirenian: so called from the resemblance into fluke of an anchor.
    • generally speaking, a winglike formation on a central piece.
    • Games An accidentally good or effective stroke in billiards or share.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • The part of an anchor which captures inside floor. See anchor.
    • In mining, a guitar accustomed cleanse a hole before charging you it with powder for blasting.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally effective swing; the bonus attained whenever, playing to begin with, one gets another; therefore, any unanticipated or accidental benefit or turn; a chance; a scratch.
    • One of the barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: known as by English whalemen wither.
    • Any American flounder of genus Paralichthys, particularly Paralicthys dentatus, based in the Atlantic Ocean as well as in adjacent bays.
    • A lucky or improbable event, aided by the implication that the occurrence could not be duplicated.
    • An accidental and positive swing at billiards (called a scratch in america); thus, any accidental or unanticipated benefit.
    • A name given in your area in the uk to types of flatfish.
    • thus— To become refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance aboard ship.
    • Either half the end of a cetacean or sirenian: so called from the similarity into the fluke of an anchor.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of a number of species, having a flat, lanceolate human body as well as 2 suckers. Two types (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are found in livers of sheep, and create the illness labeled as decompose.
    • A name provided in your area in Great Britain to types of flatfish.
    • The element of an anchor which fastens inside surface; a flook. See anchor.
    • In mining, a musical instrument always clean a hole previous to charging it with dust for blasting.
    • therefore— to attend sleep; bunk or turn in.
    • The section of an anchor which catches inside surface. See anchor.
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm associated with order Trematoidea, infesting parts of guy alongside pets, particularly the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so named from the similarity of their hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • spend cotton fiber.
    • among lobes of a whale's end, so named from resemblance to the fluke of an anchor.
    • A flounder.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally successful swing; the advantage gained whenever, playing for one thing, one gets another; for this reason, any unforeseen or accidental benefit or turn; a chance; a scratch.
    • A lock of locks.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm regarding the Trematoda class, regarding the tapeworm.
    • ergo— In order to become refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance on-board ship.
    • An instrument for cleaning out a hole drilled in rock for blasting.
    • A result of accident or happy opportunity instead of of ability.
    • Either associated with the two lobes of a whale's or similar creature's end.
    • For this reason— to visit bed; bunk or turn-in.
    • A failure, since a yacht-race for lack of wind.
    • the triangular blades after an anchor, designed to catch the ground.
    • A name offered in your area in the uk to species of flatfish.
    • A metal hook regarding head of specific staff tools (including a bill), produced in numerous kinds based on function, whether employed for grappling or even penetrate armour when swung at an opponent.
    • a stroke of fortune
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm of the purchase Trematoidea, infesting various parts of man also animals, particularly the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so called from resemblance of their hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • as a whole, a winglike formation on a central piece.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • either associated with two lobes for the end of a cetacean
    • Any US flounder of genus Paralichthys, specially Paralicthys dentatus, based in the Atlantic Ocean and in adjacent bays.
    • flat bladelike projection in the arm of an anchor
    • A name offered in your area in the uk to species of flatfish.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of a few types, having an appartment, lanceolate human body and two suckers. Two types (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are located in the livers of sheep, and create the disease labeled as decompose.
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm of this order Trematoidea, infesting various parts of guy along with other creatures, especially the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so-called from the resemblance of their hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • parasitic flatworms having exterior suckers for affixing to a host
    • The section of an anchor which fastens within the surface; a flook. See anchor.
    • Waste cotton.
    • the barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: called by English whalemen wither.
    • any one of numerous flatfishes, particularly a flounder for the genus Paralichthys.
    • One of the lobes of a whale's tail, so called through the resemblance towards the fluke of an anchor.
    • A lock of tresses.
    • due to accident or fortunate possibility without of skill.
    • a guitar for cleaning out a hole drilled in rock for blasting.
    • A failure, at the time of a yacht-race for lack of wind.
    • An accidental and positive swing at billiards (called a scratch in america); hence, any accidental or unforeseen advantage.
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm of purchase Trematoidea, infesting parts of man alongside pets, especially the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so named from similarity of its hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • An accidental and positive swing at billiards (known as a scratch in the us); thus, any accidental or unanticipated advantage.
    • a stroke of fortune
    • spend cotton fiber.
    • any one of various flatfishes, particularly a flounder of genus Paralichthys.
    • See trematode.
    • Either 1 / 2 of the end of a cetacean or sirenian: so named from its similarity on fluke of an anchor.
    • The element of an anchor which captures when you look at the surface. See anchor.
    • one of several barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: known as by English whalemen wither.
    • See trematode.
    • Nautical The triangular blade at the end of an arm of an anchor, designed to capture in surface.
    • In mining, a musical instrument accustomed cleanse a hole previous to charging it with dust for blasting.
    • spend cotton fiber.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • A lock of locks.
    • Either half of the end of a cetacean or sirenian: so named from the similarity to the fluke of an anchor.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally effective stroke; the bonus attained when, playing for starters, one gets another; hence, any unexpected or accidental advantage or turn; the possibility; a scratch.
    • Nautical The triangular blade at the end of an arm of an anchor, made to get inside floor.
    • A barb or barbed mind, since on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • The element of an anchor which grabs into the floor. See anchor.
    • either for the two lobes of tail of a cetacean
    • due to accident or happy opportunity as opposed to of ability.
    • one of several barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: called by English whalemen wither.
    • A barb or barbed head, because on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • Hence— To become refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance up to speed ship.
    • Either regarding the two horizontally flattened divisions for the end of a whale.
    • In mining, a guitar accustomed clean a hole earlier than recharging it with powder for blasting.
    • A failure, as of a yacht-race for insufficient wind.
    • level bladelike projection on arm of an anchor
    • Either half the end of a cetacean or sirenian: so called from the similarity to the fluke of an anchor.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally effective swing; the bonus attained when, playing for one thing, one gets another; therefore, any unforeseen or accidental advantage or change; the possibility; a scratch.
    • A stroke of good luck.
    • For this reason— to attend bed; bunk or turn-in.
    • parasitic flatworms having outside suckers for affixing to a number
    • In mining, a guitar used to cleanse a hole before charging it with dust for blasting.
    • thus— In order to become refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance on-board ship.
    • Any of numerous flatfishes, specifically a flounder associated with the genus Paralichthys.
    • A chance occurrence; a major accident.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally successful stroke; the benefit attained whenever, playing for starters, one gets another; thus, any unexpected or accidental advantage or change; an opportunity; a scratch.
    • For this reason— to visit bed; bunk or submit.
    • Any of various flatfishes, specially a flounder of the genus Paralichthys.
    • A lock of locks.
    • Either associated with two horizontally flattened divisions for the end of a whale.
    • See trematode.
    • Any of numerous flatfishes, specifically a flounder of this genus Paralichthys.
    • Nautical The triangular knife at the end of an arm of an anchor, made to catch in surface.
    • See trematode.
    • A result of accident or lucky possibility without of skill.
    • a stroke of chance
    • A stroke of good fortune.
    • See trematode.
    • Games An accidentally good or effective swing in billiards or pool.
    • Nautical The triangular knife after an arm of an anchor, built to catch within the floor.
    • a deep failing, since a yacht-race for decreased wind.
    • A chance occurrence; a major accident.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • A lucky or improbable incident, using the implication your event cannot be duplicated.
    • Nautical The triangular blade at the conclusion of an arm of an anchor, designed to get within the surface.
    • A barb or barbed mind, because on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • A name provided in your area in the uk to types of flatfish.
    • A barb or barbed head, since on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • either for the two lobes for the end of a cetacean
    • A barb or barbed head, because on an arrow or a harpoon.
    • Either of two horizontally flattened divisions regarding the tail of a whale.
    • Games An accidentally great or successful stroke in billiards or pool.
    • Either of the two horizontally flattened divisions of tail of a whale.
    • a stroke of chance
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm of the purchase Trematoidea, infesting differing of man alongside animals, particularly the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so-called from similarity of their hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • A stroke of great luck.
    • Either of two horizontally flattened divisions associated with end of a whale.
    • level bladelike projection on the supply of an anchor
    • thus— To become refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance aboard ship.
    • parasitic flatworms having outside suckers for attaching to a host
    • an opportunity event; an accident.
    • A stroke of good fortune.
    • Waste cotton fiber.
    • A stroke of good luck.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • ergo— to attend bed; bunk or turn-in.
    • an opportunity occurrence; any sort of accident.
    • Games An accidentally great or effective swing in billiards or pool.
    • an opportunity occurrence; any sort of accident.
    • A name offered in your area in Great Britain to species of flatfish.
    • A lucky or improbable incident, with the implication your occurrence couldn't be duplicated.
    • A flounder.
    • A lock of tresses.
    • either associated with two lobes of the end of a cetacean
    • Games An accidentally great or successful stroke in billiards or pool.
    • A lucky or improbable occurrence, because of the implication that occurrence cannot be duplicated.
    • Games An accidentally great or effective swing in billiards or pool.
    • level bladelike projection on supply of an anchor
    • due to accident or fortunate possibility as opposed to of ability.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm regarding the Trematoda course, linked to the tapeworm.
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm of the order Trematoidea, infesting various parts of man along with other animals, particularly the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so-called through the similarity of the hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • A lucky or improbable incident, using implication that event could not be duplicated.
    • Either for the two lobes of a whale's or comparable creature's end.
    • a deep failing, since a yacht-race for lack of wind.
    • parasitic flatworms having external suckers for connecting to a number
    • A lucky or improbable event, using implication the event cannot be duplicated.
    • Waste cotton fiber.
    • Any of the triangular blades at the end of an anchor, designed to catch the floor.
    • A name given locally in the uk to species of flatfish.
    • A metal hook on head of specific staff weapons (such as a bill), made in different kinds based purpose, whether useful for grappling or even to enter armour when swung at an opponent.
    • A flounder.
    • a stroke of fortune
    • A lock of locks.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • generally speaking, a winglike formation on a central piece.
    • A flounder.
    • A flounder.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm of this Trematoda course, related to the tapeworm.
    • A result of accident or happy possibility without of skill.
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm of the purchase Trematoidea, infesting differing of guy along with other animals, especially the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so-called through the similarity of the hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm for the Trematoda course, pertaining to the tapeworm.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm of the Trematoda course, regarding the tapeworm.
    • Either associated with two lobes of a whale's or similar animal's tail.
    • failing, as of a yacht-race for not enough wind.
    • either associated with two lobes associated with the tail of a cetacean
    • Waste cotton fiber.
    • Either associated with the two lobes of a whale's or comparable creature's end.
    • the triangular blades at the conclusion of an anchor, designed to get the ground.
    • Any American flounder of genus Paralichthys, specially Paralicthys dentatus, based in the Atlantic Ocean plus in adjacent bays.
    • level bladelike projection on arm of an anchor
    • Either regarding the two lobes of a whale's or similar creature's end.
    • A lock of tresses.
    • A flounder.
    • A metal hook from the mind of specific staff tools (such as for example a bill), built in different kinds depending on function, whether used for grappling or even to penetrate armour whenever swung at an opponent.
    • the triangular blades at the end of an anchor, designed to capture the ground.
    • parasitic flatworms having outside suckers for attaching to a host
    • a stroke of luck
    • A parasitic trematode worm of several species, having a flat, lanceolate body and two suckers. Two species (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are found inside livers of sheep, and produce the illness labeled as rot.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • In general, a winglike development on a central piece.
    • A metal hook in the head of specific staff weapons (including a bill), manufactured in numerous kinds dependent on function, whether employed for grappling or to enter armour when swung at an opponent.
    • some of the triangular blades after an anchor, designed to catch the floor.
    • A result of accident or fortunate possibility without of skill.
    • A trematode; a parasitic flatworm associated with Trematoda course, associated with the tapeworm.
    • The part of an anchor which fastens within the ground; a flook. See anchor.
    • generally, a winglike development on a central piece.
    • either regarding the two lobes regarding the tail of a cetacean
    • failing, at the time of a yacht-race for insufficient wind.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • A metal hook regarding the head of particular staff tools (including a bill), manufactured in various types based on purpose, whether used for grappling or to penetrate armour when swung at an opponent.
    • Either of two lobes of a whale's or comparable animal's end.
    • among lobes of a whale's tail, so-called through the similarity to the fluke of an anchor.
    • Any US flounder of the genus Paralichthys, particularly Paralicthys dentatus, found in the Atlantic Ocean as well as in adjacent bays.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • some of the triangular blades at the end of an anchor, built to capture the bottom.
    • as a whole, a winglike formation on a central piece.
    • flat bladelike projection on arm of an anchor
    • a guitar for cleansing a hole drilled in stone for blasting.
    • a stroke of fortune
    • A parasitic trematode worm of several species, having a-flat, lanceolate human anatomy as well as 2 suckers. Two types (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are observed in livers of sheep, and create the disease labeled as decompose.
    • Any US flounder of the genus Paralichthys, particularly Paralicthys dentatus, based in the Atlantic Ocean plus in adjacent bays.
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • An accidental and positive swing at billiards (known as a scratch in the us); for this reason, any accidental or unexpected benefit.
    • A metal hook regarding mind of certain staff tools (such as for example a bill), made in various types depending on purpose, whether useful for grappling or even to penetrate armour whenever swung at an opponent.
    • parasitic flatworms having additional suckers for affixing to a bunch
    • A parasitic trematode worm of a few types, having an appartment, lanceolate human body and two suckers. Two types (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are found in livers of sheep, and create the illness called rot.
    • The section of an anchor which fastens in floor; a flook. See anchor.
    • Any United states flounder associated with the genus Paralichthys, specifically Paralicthys dentatus, found in the Atlantic Ocean and in adjacent bays.
    • as a whole, a winglike development on a central piece.
    • among the lobes of a whale's end, so named from similarity to the fluke of an anchor.
    • The section of an anchor which fastens when you look at the floor; a flook. See anchor.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of a number of types, having a set, lanceolate human anatomy and two suckers. Two types (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are located when you look at the livers of sheep, and produce the disease called decay.
    • The part of an anchor which captures in surface. See anchor.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • The part of an anchor which fastens within the floor; a flook. See anchor.
    • the barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: called by English whalemen wither.
    • either associated with two lobes for the tail of a cetacean
    • a guitar for cleaning out a hole drilled in stone for blasting.
    • among lobes of a whale's tail, so-called through the resemblance towards the fluke of an anchor.
    • flat bladelike projection on the arm of an anchor
    • among lobes of a whale's tail, so named from the similarity towards the fluke of an anchor.
    • a musical instrument for cleaning up a hole drilled in stone for blasting.
    • An accidental and favorable swing at billiards (called a scratch in the us); hence, any accidental or unexpected advantage.
    • parasitic flatworms having outside suckers for attaching to a bunch
    • The European flounder. See flounder.
    • An accidental and favorable swing at billiards (called a scratch in the United States); hence, any accidental or unanticipated advantage.
    • a musical instrument for cleansing a hole drilled in stone for blasting.
    • Any US flounder of the genus Paralichthys, particularly Paralicthys dentatus, based in the Atlantic Ocean plus adjacent bays.
    • Either 50 % of the tail of a cetacean or sirenian: so called from the similarity to the fluke of an anchor.
    • A parasitic trematode worm of a number of species, having a-flat, lanceolate human anatomy and two suckers. Two species (Fasciola hepatica and Distoma lanceolatum) are located into the livers of sheep, and produce the disease called decay.
    • In mining, an instrument familiar with cleanse a hole previous to billing it with powder for blasting.
    • An accidental and positive swing at billiards (called a scratch in the usa); thus, any accidental or unanticipated advantage.
    • The section of an anchor which fastens within the ground; a flook. See anchor.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally successful stroke; the advantage gained whenever, playing for one thing, one gets another; hence, any unanticipated or accidental benefit or turn; the opportunity; a scratch.
    • The element of an anchor which grabs into the ground. See anchor.
    • among lobes of a whale's end, so called from the similarity to your fluke of an anchor.
    • The part of an anchor which catches in the floor. See anchor.
    • An instrument for cleaning out a hole drilled in rock for blasting.
    • One of the barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: called by English whalemen wither.
    • one of many barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: known as by English whalemen wither.
    • The section of an anchor which catches in floor. See anchor.
    • An accidental and favorable swing at billiards (known as a scratch in america); for this reason, any accidental or unanticipated advantage.
    • Either 1 / 2 of the end of a cetacean or sirenian: so named from the resemblance into the fluke of an anchor.
    • the barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: known as by English whalemen wither.
    • Either half the tail of a cetacean or sirenian: so named from the similarity toward fluke of an anchor.
    • thus— In order to become refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance agreeable ship.
    • In mining, an instrument accustomed clean a hole before charging it with powder for blasting.
    • Either 50 % of the tail of a cetacean or sirenian: so named from the resemblance into the fluke of an anchor.
    • ergo— to visit bed; bunk or submit.
    • The part of an anchor which grabs in the ground. See anchor.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally effective swing; the bonus attained when, playing to begin with, one gets another; for this reason, any unanticipated or accidental advantage or turn; the possibility; a scratch.
    • In mining, a musical instrument always cleanse a hole earlier than billing it with powder for blasting.
    • one of many barbs of a harpoon or toggle-iron; a flue: known as by English whalemen wither.
    • In mining, a guitar always clean a hole before recharging it with dust for blasting.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally successful stroke; the bonus gained whenever, playing for starters, one gets another; ergo, any unforeseen or accidental advantage or turn; an opportunity; a scratch.
    • thus— In order to become refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance up to speed ship.
    • Either half of the end of a cetacean or sirenian: so called from the resemblance into fluke of an anchor.
    • Hence— to be refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance onboard ship.
    • In mining, a guitar always clean a hole earlier than asking it with powder for blasting.
    • Hence— To go to sleep; bunk or turn in.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally effective swing; the advantage gained when, playing for one thing, one gets another; thus, any unexpected or accidental advantage or turn; the opportunity; a scratch.
    • Hence— to be refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance aboard ship.
    • For this reason— To go to sleep; bunk or turn in.
    • A name offered in your area in the uk to types of flatfish.
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm associated with the purchase Trematoidea, infesting various parts of man also animals, especially the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so named from the similarity of their hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • spend cotton.
    • A lock of hair.
    • A result of accident or fortunate possibility in the place of of skill.
    • a deep failing, by a yacht-race for decreased wind.
    • For this reason— To go to bed; bunk or turn in.
    • [⟨ fluke, verb] In billiards, an accidentally effective swing; the advantage attained whenever, playing for starters, one gets another; thus, any unforeseen or accidental benefit or change; the opportunity; a scratch.
    • ergo— to be refractory or mutinous; make a disturbance on board ship.
    • A name offered locally in the uk to species of flatfish.
    • therefore— To go to sleep; bunk or turn in.
    • a stroke of luck
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm regarding the order Trematoidea, infesting differing of guy and other creatures, especially the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so-called from the similarity of its hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • A name offered in your area in the uk to species of flatfish.
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm associated with the order Trematoidea, infesting various parts of man alongside pets, especially the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so-called from resemblance of the hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • spend cotton.
    • A name provided locally in the uk to types of flatfish.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • either for the two lobes of the end of a cetacean
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm of purchase Trematoidea, infesting various parts of guy along with other pets, particularly the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so-called through the similarity of their hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • A lock of tresses.
    • level bladelike projection from the supply of an anchor
    • spend cotton fiber.
    • a direct result accident or happy opportunity as opposed to of skill.
    • A name provided in your area in the uk to types of flatfish.
    • parasitic flatworms having additional suckers for attaching to a number
    • failing, as of a yacht-race for not enough wind.
    • A lock of hair.
    • A trematoid worm; an entozoic parasitic worm regarding the purchase Trematoidea, infesting various parts of man as well as other creatures, particularly the liver, bile-ducts, etc.: so called from resemblance of the hydatid to a fluke or flounder.
    • a direct result accident or happy opportunity in the place of of skill.
    • Waste cotton.
    • Waste cotton fiber.
    • a deep failing, at the time of a yacht-race for decreased wind.
    • A lock of hair.
    • a stroke of luck
    • A lock of tresses.
    • A result of accident or lucky chance without of skill.
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • due to accident or happy opportunity in place of of ability.
    • either associated with the two lobes regarding the end of a cetacean
    • A failure, by a yacht-race for not enough wind.
    • failing, since a yacht-race for not enough wind.
    • flat bladelike projection regarding arm of an anchor
    • a stroke of chance
    • a stroke of fortune
    • parasitic flatworms having external suckers for affixing to a host
    • a stroke of fortune
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • either regarding the two lobes associated with the end of a cetacean
    • a barb on a harpoon or arrow
    • either of the two lobes of end of a cetacean
    • level bladelike projection in the arm of an anchor
    • level bladelike projection from the arm of an anchor
    • parasitic flatworms having additional suckers for attaching to a bunch
    • parasitic flatworms having outside suckers for affixing to a number
    • either associated with two lobes associated with the end of a cetacean
    • flat bladelike projection in the supply of an anchor
    • parasitic flatworms having additional suckers for connecting to a number
  • verb:
    • To obtain a fruitful outcome by pure chance.
    • to have a fruitful result by pure possibility.
    • To fortuitously pot a ball in an unintended way.
    • To luckily pot a ball in an unintended means.
    • to have an effective result by pure chance.
    • To fortuitously pot a ball in an unintended means.
    • to have a fruitful result by pure chance.
    • To fortuitously pot a ball in an unintended means.
    • to get a fruitful result by pure possibility.
    • To luckily pot a ball in an unintended method.
    • for or score by a fluke.
    • To get or get by a fluke.
    • to acquire a successful result by pure opportunity.
    • To luckily pot a ball in an unintended means.
    • to obtain or score by a fluke.
    • for or score by a fluke.
    • for or score by a fluke.
    • To obtain a fruitful outcome by pure opportunity.
    • To fortuitously pot a ball in an unintended means.
    • to have or score by a fluke.
    • for or score by a fluke.
    • to have a fruitful outcome by pure possibility.
    • To fortunately pot a ball in an unintended method.
    • to have an effective result by pure possibility.
    • to acquire a successful outcome by pure possibility.
    • To obtain a successful result by pure chance.
    • To luckily pot a ball in an unintended means.
    • To obtain an effective outcome by pure chance.
    • To fortuitously pot a ball in an unintended method.
    • To fortuitously pot a ball in an unintended method.
    • To fortunately pot a ball in an unintended means.
    • for or get by a fluke.
    • getting or score by a fluke.
    • to have or get by a fluke.
    • for or score by a fluke.
    • To get or get by a fluke.
  • others:
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • To fasten, as a whale, by way of a chain or rope.
    • To fasten, as a whale, by way of a chain or rope.
    • In whaling, to utilize the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: frequently with an indefinite it.
    • In whaling, to utilize the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: often with an indefinite it.
    • To gain a bonus over a competitor or adversary accidentally or opportunity; especially, which will make a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • to get an edge over a competitor or opponent by accident or possibility; specially, to produce a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • To fasten, as a whale, through a chain or line.
    • In whaling, to utilize the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: often with an indefinite it.
    • To gain a bonus over a competitor or opponent accidentally or possibility; specifically, to make a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • In shooting, going to by a chance shot.
    • To fasten, as a whale, in the form of a chain or line.
    • In whaling, to utilize the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: usually with an indefinite it.
    • To gain a bonus over a competitor or adversary by accident or opportunity; specially, to help make a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In shooting, going to by the opportunity shot.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • In shooting, to hit by the possibility shot.
    • To fasten, as a whale, in the shape of a chain or line.
    • In whaling, to make use of the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: frequently with an indefinite it.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • To gain a bonus over a competitor or adversary by accident or opportunity; specially, which will make a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • To fasten, as a whale, by means of a chain or line.
    • In shooting, to hit by the opportunity shot.
    • In whaling, to make use of the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: frequently with an indefinite it.
    • to achieve an edge over a competitor or opponent by accident or chance; especially, to create a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • To fasten, as a whale, through a chain or line.
    • In whaling, to use the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: frequently with an indefinite it.
    • In shooting, going to by the possibility shot.
    • to get an advantage over a competitor or opponent by accident or possibility; specially, which will make a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In shooting, going to by the opportunity shot.
    • In shooting, going to by a chance shot.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • To fasten, as a whale, through a chain or rope.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • To fasten, as a whale, through a chain or line.
    • In whaling, to utilize the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: often with an indefinite it.
    • to get a plus over a competitor or opponent by accident or chance; specifically, to create a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • In whaling, to utilize the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: usually with an indefinite it.
    • In shooting, going to by the possibility shot.
    • To fasten, as a whale, through a chain or rope.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • to get an edge over a competitor or opponent by accident or chance; specially, to make a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In whaling, to utilize the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: often with an indefinite it.
    • To fasten, as a whale, by way of a chain or line.
    • To gain an edge over a competitor or adversary unintentionally or chance; specially, which will make a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In whaling, to use the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: usually with an indefinite it.
    • In whaling: To disable the flukes of, as a whale, by spading.
    • to get an edge over a competitor or adversary unintentionally or opportunity; specifically, to make a scratch in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • To fasten, as a whale, by means of a chain or rope.
    • In whaling, to utilize the flukes, as a fish or cetacean: frequently with an indefinite it.
    • to get a plus over a competitor or opponent accidentally or possibility; specially, to create a scrape in billiards. See fluke, n., 5.
    • In shooting, hitting by the possibility shot.
    • In shooting, to hit by a chance shot.
    • In shooting, hitting by a chance shot.
    • In shooting, hitting by a chance shot.

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