• Definition for "fleet"
    • numerous warships operating together under one demand.
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  • Sentence for "fleet"
    • If well executed _it would cause…
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  • Quotes for "fleet"
  • Phrases for "fleet"
  • Cross Reference for "fleet"
  • Same Context for "fleet"
  • Urban Dictionary for "fleet"

fleet definition

  • noun:
    • numerous warships operating together under one demand.
    • numerous warships running together under one command.
    • A group of vessels or cars, eg taxicabs or fishing boats, owned or managed as a unit.
    • several warships operating together under one demand.
    • a team of vessels or automobiles, eg taxicabs or fishing boats for sale, possessed or managed as a unit.
    • several vessels or cars, such as for example taxicabs or fishing boats for sale, had or operated as a unit.
    • numerous warships running together under one command.
    • a team of vessels or automobiles, including taxicabs or fishing boats, had or operated as a unit.
    • some warships operating collectively under one demand.
    • A group of vessels or vehicles, such taxicabs or fishing boats for sale, possessed or managed as a unit.
    • A group of vessels or cars.
    • numerous vessels in business, specially war vessels; additionally, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • Any command of vessels surpassing a squadron in proportions, or a rear-admiral's command, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with numerous smaller vessels.
    • a team of vessels or cars.
    • A group of vessels or automobiles.
    • some vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • A number of vessels in business, specially war vessels; in addition, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river susceptible to the tide.
    • A group of vessels or automobiles.
    • an area, as on a navigable lake, where barges are guaranteed.
    • Any command of vessels surpassing a squadron in size, or a rear-admiral's command, consists of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels.
    • Any demand of vessels exceeding a squadron in size, or a rear-admiral's command, made up of five sail-of-the-line, with numerous smaller vessels.
    • several vessels in company, specifically war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river subject to the wave.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river at the mercy of the tide.
    • an area, as on a navigable lake, in which barges tend to be guaranteed.
    • a spot, as on a navigable lake, in which barges tend to be guaranteed.
    • A group of vessels or vehicles.
    • Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in proportions, or a rear-admiral's command, consists of five sail-of-the-line, with numerous smaller vessels.
    • numerous vessels in business, specially war vessels; also, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river subject to the wave.
    • Any demand of vessels surpassing a squadron in dimensions, or a rear-admiral's demand, consists of five sail-of-the-line, with numerous smaller vessels.
    • a spot, as on a navigable river, where barges are secured.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river at the mercy of the wave.
    • a spot, as on a navigable river, in which barges are secured.
    • some warships running together under one demand.
    • a small grouping of vessels or vehicles, particularly taxicabs or fishing boats for sale, had or operated as a unit.
    • numerous vessels in business, specially war vessels; in addition, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- outdated, except as somewhere title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • an old prison in London, which initially endured near a stream, the Fleet (today chock-full).
    • numerous vessels in company, specifically war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- outdated, except as a location title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • A former jail in London, which originally stood near a stream, the Fleet (today filled up).
    • a team of vessels or automobiles.
    • Many vessels in business, specifically war vessels; in addition, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in size, or a rear-admiral's command, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels.
    • numerous vessels in organization, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- obsolete, except as a place title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river susceptible to the wave.
    • A number of vessels in company, specially war vessels; additionally, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- outdated, except as a spot title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • a place, as on a navigable river, in which barges tend to be guaranteed.
    • an old jail in London, which initially endured near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up).
    • A former prison in London, which originally stood near a stream, the Fleet (now chock-full).
    • some warships running collectively under one demand.
    • some vessels in business, especially war vessels; additionally, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • a team of vessels or vehicles, such as for example taxicabs or fishing boats for sale, had or operated as a unit.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- obsolete, except as somewhere title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • an old jail in London, which initially stood near a stream, the Fleet (now chock-full).
    • numerous boats or any other vessels, in organization, beneath the same command, or used in the same service, particularly in war or in fishing: as, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet on Finance companies; the fleet of a steamship business.
    • some warships operating together under one command.
    • especially, a number of vessels of war organized for offense or protection under one leader, with subordinate commanders of single vessels and quite often of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • several vessels or cars, particularly taxicabs or fishing boats for sale, owned or operated as a unit.
    • In fishing, an individual type of 100 hooks: so called if the bultow was introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • numerous ships or other vessels, in organization, underneath the exact same command, or used in the same solution, particularly in war or perhaps in fishing: as, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet from the Finance companies; the fleet of a steamship organization.
    • particularly, numerous vessels of war organized for offense or protection under one leader, with subordinate commanders of single vessels and quite often of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • In fishing, one line of 100 hooks: so called if the bultow had been introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • several ships or any other vessels, in company, beneath the same demand, or used in the same solution, particularly in war or perhaps in fishing: because, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet on the Financial institutions; the fleet of a steamship business.
    • An arm of the ocean; an inlet; a river or creek: today utilized just as an element in place-names: as, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • An arm associated with sea; an inlet; a river or creek: now utilized just as a feature in place-names: as, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • Specifically, a number of vessels of war organized for offense or defense under one leader, with subordinate commanders of solitary vessels and sometimes of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • A number of warships running collectively under one command.
    • In fishing, one type of 100 hooks: so called once the bultow ended up being introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • a small grouping of vessels or vehicles, such as for instance taxicabs or fishing boats for sale, had or managed as a unit.
    • several vessels or any other vessels, in organization, underneath the exact same demand, or utilized in the same service, especially in war or in fishing: because, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet from the Financial institutions; the fleet of a steamship organization.
    • An arm of this ocean; an inlet; a river or creek: today used only as a component in place-names: since, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • especially, some vessels of war organized for offense or defense under one leader, with subordinate commanders of single vessels and sometimes of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • In fishing, just one line of 100 hooks: so-called whenever bultow was introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • A group of vessels or cars.
    • An arm of water; an inlet; a river or creek: today used only as an element in place-names: since, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • several vessels in company, specially war vessels; in addition, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in proportions, or a rear-admiral's demand, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with numerous smaller vessels.
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variant of flute.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river susceptible to the tide.
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variation of flute.
    • a spot, as on a navigable lake, where barges are secured.
    • selection of cars operating collectively underneath the same ownership
    • some warships operating collectively under one command.
    • Many boats or any other vessels, in organization, underneath the same command, or utilized in the exact same solution, especially in war or perhaps in fishing: because, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet in the Finance companies; the fleet of a steamship organization.
    • Specifically, a number of vessels of war arranged for offense or security under one leader, with subordinate commanders of single vessels and quite often of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • A group of vessels or automobiles, such as for instance taxicabs or fishing boats, owned or run as a unit.
    • A number of vessels in organization, specially war vessels; additionally, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • a small grouping of vessels or cars.
    • some warships operating together under one demand.
    • A number of vessels in company, specifically war vessels; additionally, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variation of flute.
    • In fishing, one line of 100 hooks: so named when the bultow had been introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • a team of vessels or automobiles.
    • set of automobiles operating together underneath the exact same ownership
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- outdated, except as somewhere title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • several vessels or vehicles, such taxicabs or fishing boats, possessed or run as a unit.
    • An arm regarding the sea; an inlet; a river or creek: today used only as a component in place-names: since, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • Any demand of vessels surpassing a squadron in size, or a rear-admiral's demand, consists of five sail-of-the-line, with a variety of smaller vessels.
    • some vessels in organization, specially war vessels; also, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • A former jail in London, which initially stood near a stream, the Fleet (today chock-full).
    • group of motor vehicles running collectively under the exact same ownership
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river at the mercy of the wave.
    • a small grouping of warships arranged as a tactical product
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variation of flute.
    • Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in proportions, or a rear-admiral's demand, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with numerous smaller vessels.
    • a team of warships organized as a tactical unit
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river at the mercy of the wave.
    • an area, as on a navigable river, where barges are guaranteed.
    • a group of warships organized as a tactical device
    • an area, as on a navigable lake, where barges tend to be secured.
    • set of automobiles running collectively beneath the same ownership
    • selection of plane operating together underneath the same ownership
    • a group of steamships operating collectively under the exact same ownership
    • several warships organized as a tactical product
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variant of flute.
    • set of plane running collectively beneath the exact same ownership
    • band of aircraft operating collectively under the exact same ownership
    • several steamships operating together beneath the same ownership
    • a group of steamships operating together beneath the same ownership
    • set of automobiles operating collectively beneath the exact same ownership
    • A group of vessels or vehicles.
    • several vessels or vehicles.
    • band of plane running collectively underneath the exact same ownership
    • A number of vessels in organization, especially war vessels; additionally, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • some vessels in organization, especially war vessels; additionally, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • a small grouping of steamships running together beneath the exact same ownership
    • Any demand of vessels surpassing a squadron in proportions, or a rear-admiral's demand, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels.
    • Any demand of vessels surpassing a squadron in size, or a rear-admiral's command, consists of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river at the mercy of the wave.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet, a bay or estuary, a river subject to the wave.
    • a place, as on a navigable river, in which barges are guaranteed.
    • A location, as on a navigable river, where barges tend to be guaranteed.
    • several warships organized as a tactical unit
    • band of aircraft operating together in same ownership
    • numerous ships or other vessels, in business, beneath the exact same command, or used in similar solution, especially in war or perhaps in fishing: as, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet on the Banking institutions; the fleet of a steamship company.
    • a group of steamships running collectively in same ownership
    • especially, many vessels of war arranged for offense or security under one leader, with subordinate commanders of solitary vessels and often of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • several vessels in organization, specially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • In fishing, one distinct 100 hooks: so called as soon as the bultow had been introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • An arm of the water; an inlet; a river or creek: now utilized only as an element in place-names: because, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • some vessels in organization, particularly war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- obsolete, except as someplace title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • an old prison in London, which originally endured near a stream, the Fleet (today filled up).
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variant of flute.
    • band of motor vehicles running together underneath the exact same ownership
    • a group of warships arranged as a tactical product
    • Many vessels in organization, specially war vessels; additionally, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- outdated, except as a location name, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- outdated, except as someplace title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • an old prison in London, which initially stood near a stream, the Fleet (now chock-full).
    • some vessels in company, specifically war vessels; in addition, the collective naval power of a country, etc.
    • an old prison in London, which initially stood near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up).
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- obsolete, except as a location title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • A former prison in London, which initially endured near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up).
    • group of plane running together under the exact same ownership
    • numerous vessels in company, especially war vessels; additionally, the collective naval force of a country, etc.
    • a small grouping of steamships running collectively beneath the exact same ownership
    • A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; -- obsolete, except as a place title, -- as Fleet Street in London.
    • A former prison in London, which initially stood near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up).
    • some ships or other vessels, in organization, underneath the exact same command, or utilized in the same solution, especially in war or perhaps in fishing: because, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet regarding the Financial institutions; the fleet of a steamship organization.
    • exclusively, many vessels of war organized for offense or defense under one commander, with subordinate commanders of single vessels and sometimes of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • In fishing, one type of 100 hooks: so-called once the bultow was introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • An arm of the ocean; an inlet; a river or creek: now utilized just as an element in place-names: as, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • some ships or other vessels, in business, beneath the exact same demand, or used in the exact same solution, especially in war or in fishing: as, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet from the Financial institutions; the fleet of a steamship company.
    • A number of ships or other vessels, in organization, underneath the same command, or employed in the same service, particularly in war or perhaps in fishing: as, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet on Financial institutions; the fleet of a steamship business.
    • particularly, some vessels of war arranged for offense or protection under one commander, with subordinate commanders of single vessels and sometimes of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • especially, many vessels of war arranged for offense or security under one commander, with subordinate commanders of solitary vessels and quite often of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • In fishing, a single type of 100 hooks: so-called once the bultow was introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • In fishing, one type of 100 hooks: so named as soon as the bultow was introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variant of flute.
    • An arm of ocean; an inlet; a river or creek: today made use of just as an element in place-names: as, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • An arm for the water; an inlet; a river or creek: now made use of just as an element in place-names: as, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • selection of cars operating collectively beneath the same ownership
    • numerous boats or other vessels, in business, beneath the same demand, or employed in the exact same service, particularly in war or perhaps in fishing: because, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet regarding the Banking institutions; the fleet of a steamship organization.
    • Specifically, several vessels of war arranged for offense or security under one leader, with subordinate commanders of solitary vessels and sometimes of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • a team of warships organized as a tactical unit
    • In fishing, an individual line of 100 hooks: so called when the bultow ended up being introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variation of flute.
    • An arm of ocean; an inlet; a river or creek: today utilized just as a feature in place-names: as, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variation of flute.
    • selection of aircraft running collectively in same ownership
    • number of automobiles running together beneath the exact same ownership
    • a group of steamships running together under the same ownership
    • set of automobiles operating collectively underneath the same ownership
    • several warships organized as a tactical unit
    • Many vessels or other vessels, in business, beneath the exact same demand, or used in the exact same service, especially in war or in fishing: as, a fleet of men-of-war, or of war-canoes; the fishing-fleet in the Finance companies; the fleet of a steamship business.
    • a small grouping of warships organized as a tactical product
    • especially, some vessels of war arranged for offense or security under one commander, with subordinate commanders of solitary vessels and quite often of squadrons; a naval armament.
    • In fishing, a single type of 100 hooks: so-called when the bultow had been introduced in Newfoundland (1846).
    • selection of plane working together beneath the exact same ownership
    • a small grouping of steamships running together under the same ownership
    • An arm of this sea; an inlet; a river or creek: now utilized just as an element in place-names: as, Northfleet, Southfleet, Fleetditch.
    • band of plane working collectively in exact same ownership
    • several steamships operating together beneath the same ownership
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variation of flute.
    • band of cars operating collectively underneath the same ownership
    • A dialectal (Scotch) variation of flute.
    • a team of warships arranged as a tactical device
    • selection of motor vehicles running together underneath the same ownership
    • band of aircraft working collectively underneath the same ownership
    • a team of warships organized as a tactical unit
    • several steamships operating together beneath the same ownership
    • number of aircraft operating together under the exact same ownership
    • a group of steamships operating together under the same ownership
  • adjective:
    • Moving swiftly; fast or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Moving swiftly; rapid or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Moving swiftly; quick or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • Moving swiftly; rapid or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • going swiftly; quick or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • Swift in motion; going with velocity; light and quick in going from place to place; nimble; fast.
    • Swift in movement; going with velocity; light and fast in going from location to location; nimble; fast.
    • Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and fast in going from destination to destination; nimble; fast.
    • Light; superficially thin; perhaps not acute deep, as earth.
    • Light; superficially slim; not acute deep, as earth.
    • Light; superficially thin; perhaps not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and fast in going from destination to spot; nimble; quickly.
    • Light; superficially slim; not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • Swift in motion; going with velocity; light and fast in-going from spot to location; nimble; fast.
    • Light; superficially thin; perhaps not acute deep, as earth.
    • Swift in movement; going with velocity; light and fast in going from location to destination; nimble.
    • Moving swiftly; fast or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Light; superficially thin; maybe not penetrating deep, as earth.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • Swift in motion; going with velocity; light and quick in going from place to place; nimble.
    • Light; superficially slim; perhaps not penetrating deep, as earth.
    • Swift in movement; moving with velocity; light and fast in-going from place to destination; nimble.
    • Light; superficially slim; perhaps not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and fast in-going from place to location; nimble.
    • Light; superficially thin; not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and quick in-going from location to destination; nimble.
    • Light; superficially slim; not acute deep, as earth.
    • going swiftly; quick or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Swift in movement; moving with velocity; light and quick in going from spot to location; nimble; fast.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • Light; superficially thin; maybe not acute deep, as soil.
    • Moving swiftly; fast or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • going swiftly; quick or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Swift in movement; moving with velocity; light and quick in-going from place to place; nimble.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • Light; superficially slim; not acute deep, as earth.
    • moving extremely fast
    • going swiftly; fast or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • going quickly
    • Moving swiftly; rapid or nimble. See Synonyms at fast1.
    • Fleeting; evanescent.
    • moving extremely fast
    • going quickly
    • Swift in motion; going with velocity; light and fast in-going from place to spot; nimble; quickly.
    • Light; superficially slim; perhaps not acute deep, as soil.
    • Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and fast in-going from place to place; nimble; quickly.
    • Light; superficially thin; maybe not acute deep, as soil.
    • Swift in motion; going with velocity; light and quick in going from destination to location; nimble; quickly.
    • Light; superficially thin; maybe not acute deep, as soil.
    • moving extremely fast
    • Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and quick in going from spot to spot; nimble; quickly.
    • Swift in movement; going with velocity; light and quick in-going from spot to place; nimble.
    • Light; superficially thin; perhaps not acute deep, as soil.
    • Swift in motion; going with velocity; light and fast in going from spot to spot; nimble; fast.
    • Light; superficially slim; not acute deep, as soil.
    • Light; superficially slim; maybe not penetrating deep, as earth.
    • Swift in movement; moving with velocity; light and quick in-going from place to place; nimble.
    • Light; superficially thin; perhaps not penetrating deep, as earth.
    • Swift in movement; going with velocity; light and quick in-going from spot to spot; nimble.
    • moving quickly
    • Light; superficially thin; perhaps not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • Swift in motion; going with velocity; light and fast in-going from location to place; nimble.
    • Light; superficially thin; not acute deep, as soil.
    • Swift in movement; going with velocity; light and fast in-going from spot to location; nimble.
    • Light; superficially slim; not penetrating deep, as earth.
    • going extremely fast
    • going extremely fast
    • going very fast
    • moving quickly
    • moving very fast
  • verb-intransitive:
    • To move or pass swiftly.
    • to maneuver or pass swiftly.
    • To fade-out; vanish.
    • to go or pass swiftly.
    • To fade-out; vanish.
    • Archaic To move.
    • to maneuver or pass swiftly.
    • To fade out; vanish.
    • Archaic To flow.
    • Obsolete To move.
    • Archaic To flow.
    • Obsolete To move.
    • to go or pass swiftly.
    • To fade out; vanish.
    • Obsolete To drift.
    • To fade out; vanish.
    • Archaic To move.
    • Archaic To move.
    • Obsolete To drift.
    • Obsolete To move.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To travel swiftly; to pass through more than quickly; to hasten; to flit as a light substance.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To slip in the whelps and/or barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- stated of a cable or hawser.
    • To move or change in position; -- said of individuals.
    • To fly swiftly; to pass over rapidly; to accelerate; to flit as a light compound.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To slip from the whelps or even the barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- stated of a cable or hawser.
    • To move or improvement in place; -- stated of persons.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To travel swiftly; to pass through more than rapidly; to hasten; to flit as a light material.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To slip from the whelps or even the barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- said of a cable or hawser.
    • to go or improvement in place; -- stated of persons.
    • To fly swiftly; to pass more than rapidly; to hasten; to flit as a light substance.
    • to slide regarding whelps and/or barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- stated of a cable or hawser.
    • To fly swiftly; to pass over rapidly; to hasten; to flit as a light material.
    • to go or change in position; -- said of individuals.
    • to go or pass swiftly.
    • to slide on the whelps and/or barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- said of a cable or hawser.
    • To fade-out; vanish.
    • To move or change in position; -- said of people.
    • Archaic To move.
    • Obsolete To move.
    • to go or pass swiftly.
    • To fade out; vanish.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To fly swiftly; to pass over quickly; to accelerate; to flit as a light substance.
    • To slip on whelps or the barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- said of a cable or hawser.
    • to maneuver or change in position; -- stated of people.
    • To move or pass swiftly.
    • To fade-out; vanish.
    • Archaic To flow.
    • Archaic To flow.
    • Obsolete To drift.
    • Obsolete To drift.
    • to go or pass swiftly.
    • To fade-out; vanish.
    • Archaic To move.
    • Obsolete To drift.
    • To move or pass swiftly.
    • to go or pass swiftly.
    • To fade out; vanish.
    • To fade out; vanish.
    • Archaic To flow.
    • Archaic To move.
    • Obsolete To drift.
    • Obsolete To move.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To travel swiftly; to pass through over quickly; to hasten; to flit as a light compound.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To travel swiftly; to pass through more than quickly; to accelerate; to flit as a light compound.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To slip on whelps or even the barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- stated of a cable or hawser.
    • To fly swiftly; to pass through over quickly; to accelerate; to flit as a light compound.
    • To move or improvement in place; -- stated of persons.
    • To slip regarding whelps or even the barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- stated of a cable or hawser.
    • To move or improvement in position; -- stated of persons.
    • To slip on the whelps or perhaps the barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- stated of a cable or hawser.
    • to maneuver or improvement in position; -- said of individuals.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To sail; to float.
    • To fly swiftly; to pass over rapidly; to accelerate; to flit as a light compound.
    • To travel swiftly; to pass more than quickly; to accelerate; to flit as a light material.
    • To slip regarding whelps or the barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- stated of a cable or hawser.
    • To slip regarding whelps and/or barrel of a capstan or windlass; -- said of a cable or hawser.
    • To move or change in position; -- said of persons.
    • to go or change in position; -- stated of individuals.
  • verb-transitive:
    • resulting in (time) to pass through rapidly.
    • Nautical To alter the positioning of (tackle or rope, including).
    • To cause (time) to pass through quickly.
    • To cause (time) to pass through quickly.
    • Nautical to improve the positioning of (tackle or line, including).
    • Nautical To alter the position of (tackle or rope, as an example).
    • resulting in (time) to pass rapidly.
    • To cause (time) to pass through rapidly.
    • Nautical to change the position of (tackle or line, for instance).
    • Nautical To alter the career of (tackle or rope, as an example).
    • to pass through over rapidly; to skin the outer lining of.
    • To hasten more than; to cause to pass away lighty, or in mirth and happiness.
    • to pass through more than rapidly; to surface the top of.
    • to-draw apart the blocks of; -- stated of a tackle.
    • To cause to slide down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • To accelerate over; resulting in to pass through away lighty, or perhaps in mirth and joy.
    • To move or change in position; used just in special phrases.
    • To draw apart the blocks of; -- stated of a tackle.
    • To cause to slide down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
    • To pass more than quickly; to surface the outer lining of.
    • To move or improvement in place; utilized only in special expressions.
    • To accelerate over; resulting in to pass away lighty, or in mirth and delight.
    • To pass more than rapidly; to skin the area of.
    • To hasten over; resulting in to pass away lighty, or perhaps in mirth and delight.
    • To pass over rapidly; to surface the area of.
    • to-draw aside the blocks of; -- stated of a tackle.
    • To make the ointment from; to skim.
    • To hasten more than; to cause to pass away lighty, or perhaps in mirth and happiness.
    • resulting in (time) to pass through rapidly.
    • to attract apart the blocks of; -- stated of a tackle.
    • resulting in to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or string.
    • Nautical to improve the positioning of (tackle or line, like).
    • To cause to slide down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • to go or improvement in place; made use of only in unique expressions.
    • to go or improvement in position; made use of only in special expressions.
    • To use the cream from; to skim.
    • To draw apart the obstructs of; -- stated of a tackle.
    • To make the lotion from; to skim.
    • resulting in to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • To move or improvement in position; made use of just in unique expressions.
    • To use the lotion from; to skim.
    • To make the lotion from; to skim.
    • to pass through over quickly; to skin the outer lining of.
    • To accelerate over; to cause to pass through away lighty, or in mirth and delight.
    • To draw apart the blocks of; -- said of a tackle.
    • To cause to slip along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or string.
    • To cause (time) to pass quickly.
    • To move or change in place; utilized just in unique expressions.
    • Nautical to change the position of (tackle or line, like).
    • resulting in (time) to pass through rapidly.
    • Nautical to improve the position of (tackle or rope, for example).
    • To cause (time) to pass through quickly.
    • Nautical to improve the positioning of (tackle or rope, as an example).
    • To use the lotion from; to skim.
    • To cause (time) to pass rapidly.
    • resulting in (time) to pass quickly.
    • Nautical to improve the positioning of (tackle or line, for example).
    • Nautical To alter the positioning of (tackle or rope, including).
    • To pass more than rapidly; to surface the surface of.
    • To hasten over; resulting in to pass away lighty, or perhaps in mirth and pleasure.
    • To pass over rapidly; to skin the surface of.
    • To accelerate over; resulting in to pass away lighty, or perhaps in mirth and happiness.
    • to-draw aside the obstructs of; -- said of a tackle.
    • to-draw apart the blocks of; -- said of a tackle.
    • resulting in to slide down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or string.
    • resulting in to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • to go or improvement in position; used just in unique phrases.
    • To move or improvement in position; used only in special phrases.
    • to pass through over rapidly; to skin the surface of.
    • To hasten more than; resulting in to pass through away lighty, or perhaps in mirth and delight.
    • to pass through more than quickly; to skin the surface of.
    • To pass over quickly; to surface the area of.
    • To accelerate more than; to cause to pass through away lighty, or in mirth and happiness.
    • To take the ointment from; to skim.
    • To accelerate over; to cause to pass away lighty, or perhaps in mirth and delight.
    • to-draw apart the blocks of; -- said of a tackle.
    • to attract apart the blocks of; -- stated of a tackle.
    • To cause to slip along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a line or string.
    • To cause to slide down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
    • To move or improvement in place; utilized only in unique phrases.
    • to-draw aside the blocks of; -- stated of a tackle.
    • To move or change in place; utilized just in unique phrases.
    • To cause to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • To move or change in place; made use of only in special phrases.
    • To use the cream from; to skim.
    • To make the cream from; to skim.
    • To take the lotion from; to skim.
    • To use the ointment from; to skim.
  • verb:
    • To float.
    • to pass through over rapidly; to skim the top of
    • To accelerate over; resulting in to pass through away softly, or in mirth and pleasure
    • To float.
    • To float.
    • to pass through more than rapidly; to skim the outer lining of
    • to maneuver up a rope, to be able to carry to even more advantage; specially to-draw aside the obstructs of a tackle.
    • To pass more than rapidly; to skim the outer lining of
    • To shift the position of dead-eyes if the shrouds tend to be become too much time.
    • To accelerate over; resulting in to pass away softly, or in mirth and delight
    • To accelerate more than; to cause to pass through away gently, or in mirth and delight
    • resulting in to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • To move up a rope, to be able to haul to more benefit; especially to-draw apart the blocks of a tackle.
    • To move up a rope, so as to carry to more advantage; specially to-draw apart the blocks of a tackle.
    • To move the positioning of dead-eyes whenever shrouds are become a long time.
    • To shift the positioning of dead-eyes when the shrouds tend to be become too long.
    • To take the lotion from; to skim.
    • To cause to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
    • resulting in to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • To float.
    • To make the cream from; to skim.
    • To use the lotion from; to skim.
    • to pass through more than rapidly; to skim the surface of
    • To float.
    • To hasten over; to cause to pass through away softly, or perhaps in mirth and happiness
    • to pass through more than rapidly; to skim the surface of
    • to go up a rope, in order to carry to more benefit; especially to-draw aside the blocks of a tackle.
    • To accelerate over; to cause to pass through away softly, or perhaps in mirth and pleasure
    • To shift the position of dead-eyes once the shrouds are become a long time.
    • to go up a rope, to be able to carry to even more advantage; particularly to draw apart the obstructs of a tackle.
    • To shift the positioning of dead-eyes once the shrouds tend to be become too-long.
    • resulting in to slide down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
    • To make the lotion from; to skim.
    • resulting in to slip along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • To use the ointment from; to skim.
    • To float.
    • To pass more than quickly; to skim the surface of
    • To accelerate over; resulting in to pass away lightly, or perhaps in mirth and delight
    • to maneuver up a rope, in order to haul to more benefit; especially to-draw aside the obstructs of a tackle.
    • To shift the position of dead-eyes as soon as the shrouds are become too much time.
    • To cause to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • To use the ointment from; to skim.
    • To float.
    • To pass more than rapidly; to skim the area of
    • To hasten more than; resulting in to pass through away gently, or in mirth and happiness
    • to go up a rope, in order to haul to even more benefit; specifically to attract apart the blocks of a tackle.
    • move along rapidly and softly; skim or dart
    • To shift the position of dead-eyes when the shrouds are become too much time.
    • move along rapidly and softly; skim or dart
    • vanish gradually
    • To float.
    • resulting in to slide down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
    • move along rapidly and softly; skim or dart
    • To pass more than rapidly; to skim the outer lining of
    • To float.
    • vanish slowly
    • disappear gradually
    • To accelerate over; to cause to pass away lightly, or in mirth and delight
    • To use the ointment from; to skim.
    • to go up a rope, in order to carry to more benefit; especially to attract apart the obstructs of a tackle.
    • To pass more than rapidly; to skim the outer lining of
    • move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart
    • To accelerate over; resulting in to pass away softly, or in mirth and happiness
    • vanish gradually
    • To shift the positioning of dead-eyes as soon as the shrouds are become too-long.
    • To move up a rope, in order to haul to even more advantage; specially to draw aside the blocks of a tackle.
    • To cause to slip along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.
    • To move the career of dead-eyes whenever shrouds tend to be become a long time.
    • To take the lotion from; to skim.
    • resulting in to slip down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • To use the lotion from; to skim.
    • To float.
    • To float.
    • To pass over rapidly; to skim the top of
    • To pass more than rapidly; to skim the outer lining of
    • To hasten over; to cause to pass away lightly, or perhaps in mirth and pleasure
    • To hasten more than; to cause to pass through away softly, or perhaps in mirth and happiness
    • to go up a rope, to be able to carry to even more benefit; specially to-draw aside the blocks of a tackle.
    • To move up a rope, to be able to carry to even more benefit; specifically to-draw aside the blocks of a tackle.
    • To move the positioning of dead-eyes if the shrouds tend to be become a long time.
    • To cause to slide along the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or string.
    • To make the cream from; to skim.
    • move along rapidly and softly; skim or dart
    • To shift the positioning of dead-eyes when the shrouds are become too much time.
    • To cause to slide down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or sequence.
    • vanish gradually
    • To take the lotion from; to skim.
    • move along quickly and lightly; skim or dart
    • vanish slowly
    • move along quickly and gently; skim or dart
    • disappear slowly
    • move along rapidly and softly; skim or dart
    • move along quickly and gently; skim or dart
    • vanish slowly
    • disappear gradually
    • move along rapidly and softly; skim or dart
    • disappear gradually
    • move along quickly and gently; skim or dart
    • disappear gradually
  • others:
    • To float.
    • To swim.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To move; run, as water; circulation away.
    • To overflow; are plentiful.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • To float.
    • To fly swiftly; flit, as a light substance; expire rapidly.
    • To swim.
    • Nautical, to alter location: said of men at the office: because, to fleet ahead or aft in a boat.
    • To float.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To travel swiftly over; skim over the surface of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • To swim.
    • To flow; run, as liquid; flow away.
    • resulting in to pass swiftly or gently.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To overflow; abound.
    • To float.
    • To flow; run, as liquid; circulation away.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • To swim.
    • To overflow; are plentiful.
    • To travel swiftly; flit, as a light material; perish quickly.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To flow; run, as liquid; movement away.
    • To fly swiftly; flit, as a light material; expire quickly.
    • Nautical, to improve location: stated of males at work: because, to fleet ahead or aft in a boat.
    • Nautical, to improve the positioning of: as, to fleet a tackle (to improve its place after the blocks are drawn collectively to be able to make use of it again); to fleet the men aft (to order guys to go further aft).
    • To overflow; are plentiful.
    • Nautical, to change destination: said of men at work: because, to fleet forward or aft in a boat.
    • To travel swiftly over; skim throughout the surface of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • To float.
    • To travel swiftly over; skim within the surface of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • To travel swiftly; flit, as a light material; pass away rapidly.
    • To cause to pass swiftly or gently.
    • To swim.
    • Nautical, to alter spot: said of men at the office: as, to fleet ahead or aft in a boat.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • Nautical, to change the career of: as, to fleet a tackle (to improve its place after the obstructs are attracted collectively in order to use it once more); to fleet the males aft (to purchase males to maneuver further aft).
    • To travel swiftly over; skim throughout the surface of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • To flow; run, as water; movement away.
    • To cause to pass swiftly or gently.
    • Nautical, to improve the position of: as, to fleet a tackle (to improve its position after the blocks are drawn collectively to be able to put it to use once again); to fleet the guys aft (to purchase guys to move further aft).
    • To overflow; abound.
    • To cause to pass swiftly or gently.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • Nautical, to change the career of: as, to fleet a tackle (to change its position after the blocks tend to be attracted collectively in order to utilize it once more); to fleet the males aft (to purchase guys to move additional aft).
    • Swift of movement; moving or in a position to move with rapidity; quick.
    • To travel swiftly; flit, as a light substance; perish quickly.
    • To skim, as lotion from milk.
    • Nautical, to alter place: stated of men in the office: since, to fleet forward or aft in a boat.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water through the area of (the ocean), as practised at the mouth for the Rhone, of this Nile, etc.
    • Swift of movement; moving or able to go with rapidity; rapid.
    • To travel swiftly over; skim over the surface of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; thin; perhaps not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • To skim, as lotion from milk.
    • To cause to pass swiftly or lightly.
    • In a fashion to be able to impact only the area; superficially.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water through the area of (the sea), as practised in the lips associated with the Rhone, associated with the Nile, etc.
    • Swift of motion; going or able to go with rapidity; fast.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; slim; perhaps not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • To skim, as cream from milk.
    • Skimmed; skim: put on skim-milk or even to cheese produced from it: as, fleet milk, fleet mozzarella cheese.
    • In a manner to be able to influence just the area; superficially.
    • Swift of motion; moving or in a position to go with rapidity; rapid.
    • Nautical, to improve the career of: as, to fleet a tackle (to change its position following the obstructs are drawn collectively so as to use it once more); to fleet the males aft (to order guys to maneuver further aft).
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water from area of (the sea), as practised at mouth of Rhone, for the Nile, etc.
    • To skim, as ointment from milk.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; slim; maybe not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water from the area of (the sea), as practised within mouth of this Rhone, of Nile, etc.
    • Skimmed; skim: put on skim-milk or to cheese made from it: since, fleet milk, fleet cheese.
    • In a way to be able to affect only the surface; superficially.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; thin; not penetrating deep, as earth.
    • Skimmed; skim: applied to skim-milk or even cheese produced from it: as, fleet milk, fleet mozzarella cheese.
    • In a way so as to impact only the area; superficially.
    • Swift of movement; going or capable move with rapidity; rapid.
    • To skim, as lotion from milk.
    • To float.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water through the surface of (the sea), as practised at mouth associated with Rhone, for the Nile, etc.
    • Skimmed; skim: placed on skim-milk or even cheese made of it: as, fleet milk, fleet mozzarella cheese.
    • To swim.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; thin; perhaps not penetrating deep, as earth.
    • In a fashion to be able to affect just the area; superficially.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To flow; run, as liquid; movement away.
    • Skimmed; skim: put on skim-milk or even cheese made of it: since, fleet milk, fleet mozzarella cheese.
    • To overflow; abound.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • To travel swiftly; flit, as a light compound; perish rapidly.
    • Nautical, to improve place: stated of males at the office: since, to fleet ahead or aft in a boat.
    • To travel swiftly over; skim across area of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • resulting in to pass through swiftly or gently.
    • Nautical, to alter the career of: as, to fleet a tackle (to improve its place following the blocks are attracted collectively to be able to use it again); to fleet the guys aft (to order males to go additional aft).
    • Swift of motion; going or capable go with rapidity; rapid.
    • To skim, as cream from milk.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water from surface of (the ocean), as practised during the mouth associated with Rhone, of the Nile, etc.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; thin; not acute deep, as soil.
    • To float.
    • In a fashion to be able to influence only the area; superficially.
    • To swim.
    • Skimmed; skim: put on skim-milk or even to cheese made from it: as, fleet milk, fleet cheese.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To flow; run, as water; circulation away.
    • To overflow; are plentiful.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • To fly swiftly; flit, as a light compound; perish quickly.
    • Nautical, to change place: said of males at the office: as, to fleet ahead or aft in a boat.
    • To float.
    • To float.
    • To swim.
    • To fly swiftly over; skim over the area of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • To swim.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • resulting in to pass through swiftly or softly.
    • To move; run, as water; flow away.
    • To overflow; are plentiful.
    • Nautical, to change the career of: as, to fleet a tackle (to improve its place following the blocks tend to be drawn collectively so as to utilize it once more); to fleet the guys aft (to purchase males to move further aft).
    • To flow; run, as water; flow away.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • To overflow; abound.
    • To float.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • To travel swiftly; flit, as a light compound; expire rapidly.
    • To swim.
    • To fly swiftly; flit, as a light substance; expire quickly.
    • Nautical, to change destination: said of men in the office: since, to fleet ahead or aft in a boat.
    • Nautical, to change spot: stated of males at the office: because, to fleet forward or aft in a boat.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To fly swiftly over; skim on the area of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • To fly swiftly over; skim on the surface of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • To flow; run, as liquid; circulation away.
    • resulting in to pass through swiftly or lightly.
    • Swift of movement; moving or capable go with rapidity; rapid.
    • To float.
    • To overflow; are plentiful.
    • To cause to pass swiftly or softly.
    • To skim, as cream from milk.
    • Nautical, to alter the career of: as, to fleet a tackle (to alter its place following the obstructs tend to be drawn collectively in order to make use of it again); to fleet the males aft (to purchase guys to go additional aft).
    • Nautical, to alter the career of: as, to fleet a tackle (to improve its place after the blocks tend to be attracted together so as to make use of it once more); to fleet the males aft (to purchase guys to move additional aft).
    • To swim.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh-water through the surface of (the sea), as practised at the mouth of this Rhone, of the Nile, etc.
    • To sail; navigate.
    • To fly swiftly; flit, as a light substance; pass away rapidly.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; slim; not acute deep, as soil.
    • To flow; run, as water; flow away.
    • Nautical, to alter spot: stated of men at work: as, to fleet forward or aft in a boat.
    • In a fashion in order to affect just the area; superficially.
    • To overflow; abound.
    • To travel swiftly over; skim within the area of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • To gutter, as a candle.
    • resulting in to pass swiftly or lightly.
    • Swift of movement; moving or capable move with rapidity; rapid.
    • Skimmed; skim: placed on skim-milk or to cheese produced from it: since, fleet milk, fleet cheese.
    • To fly swiftly; flit, as a light compound; perish rapidly.
    • Nautical, to improve the position of: as, to fleet a tackle (to improve its place following the obstructs tend to be drawn together in order to put it to use again); to fleet the males aft (to purchase guys to maneuver further aft).
    • Swift of motion; moving or capable move with rapidity; rapid.
    • To skim, as lotion from milk.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water from surface of (the ocean), as practised at mouth of the Rhone, of this Nile, etc.
    • To skim, as ointment from milk.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; slim; maybe not acute deep, as soil.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water from area of (the sea), as practised within mouth associated with the Rhone, of this Nile, etc.
    • In a manner to be able to impact only the area; superficially.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; thin; perhaps not acute deep, as soil.
    • In a fashion to be able to affect only the surface; superficially.
    • Skimmed; skim: applied to skim-milk or even to cheese made of it: because, fleet milk, fleet cheese.
    • Nautical, to change place: said of men at the job: as, to fleet forward or aft in a boat.
    • Swift of movement; moving or able to move with rapidity; fast.
    • To skim, as ointment from milk.
    • To fly swiftly over; skim across area of: as, a ship that fleets the gulf.
    • Skimmed; skim: put on skim-milk or to cheese made from it: because, fleet milk, fleet mozzarella cheese.
    • resulting in to pass through swiftly or lightly.
    • Nautical, to improve the positioning of: as, to fleet a tackle (to improve its place after the obstructs tend to be drawn together in order to make use of it once again); to fleet the guys aft (to purchase men to maneuver additional aft).
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water through the area of (the ocean), as practised at lips for the Rhone, of the Nile, etc.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; thin; not penetrating deep, as soil.
    • Swift of motion; moving or capable go with rapidity; rapid.
    • In a way so as to affect just the surface; superficially.
    • To skim, as cream from milk.
    • Nautical, to skim up fresh water through the area of (the ocean), as practised at the lips of the Rhone, of Nile, etc.
    • Skimmed; skim: put on skim-milk or to cheese made from it: because, fleet milk, fleet cheese.
    • Light; superficially fruitful; slim; perhaps not acute deep, as earth.
    • In a fashion to be able to influence only the surface; superficially.
    • Skimmed; skim: put on skim-milk or even cheese made from it: as, fleet milk, fleet mozzarella cheese.
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