flax definition

  • noun:
    • A widely cultivated plant, Linum usitatissimum, having pale-blue plants, seeds that yield linseed oil, and slender stems from which a textile fiber is acquired.
    • A widely cultivated plant, Linum usitatissimum, having pale blue flowers, seeds that yield linseed oil, and slender stems from which a textile fibre is gotten.
    • The fine, light-colored textile fibre obtained from this plant.
    • The good, light-colored textile fibre gotten with this plant.
    • any one of various other flowers for the genus Linum or of similar or related genera.
    • any one of many other flowers regarding the genus Linum or of similar or related genera.
    • A pale grayish yellow.
    • A pale grayish yellowish.
    • A plant for the genus Linum, particularly Linum usitatissimum, that has a single, slim stalk, about a foot . 5 large, with blue flowers. Also known as linseed, especially when discussing the seeds.
    • A plant of genus Linum, specifically Linum usitatissimum, that has just one, slender stalk, about a foot . 5 high, with blue blossoms. Also known as linseed, especially when referring to the seeds.
    • The materials of Linum usitatissimum, grown which will make linen and relevant fabrics.
    • The fibers of Linum usitatissimum, grown to produce linen and relevant textiles.
    • A plant of the genus Phormium, native to New Zealand, with strap-like leaves as much as 3 metres very long that grow in clumps called flax bushes.
    • A plant associated with the genus Phormium, indigenous to New Zealand, with strap-like leaves up to 3 metres very long that grow in clumps called flax shrubs.
    • A plant for the genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, which has a single, slender stalk, about a foot and a half high, with blue flowers. The fibre of the bark is used to make thread and fabric, known as linen, cambric, lawn, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed from the seed.
    • A plant associated with the genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, that has an individual, thin stalk, about a foot and a half large, with blue blossoms. The fiber of bark is employed for making thread and fabric, known as linen, cambric, lawn, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed from seed.
    • skin or fibrous part of the flax plant, when broken and washed by hatcheling or combing.
    • The skin or fibrous part of the flax plant, whenever broken and cleansed by hatcheling or combing.
    • the normal title for plants for the genus Linum and also for the dietary fiber obtained through the stems of L. usitatissimum.
    • The common title for plants of genus Linum and also for the fiber obtained from stems of L. usitatissimum.
    • one of the plants of other genera, mainly resembling typical flax, given that false or white flax (Camelina sativa), mountain flax (Polygala Senega), toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), which yields a very good dietary fiber, and spurge-flax (Daphne Gnidium).
    • one of the plants of other genera, mostly resembling common flax, as the untrue or white flax (Camelina sativa), hill flax (Polygala Senega), toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), brand new Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), which yields a very good dietary fiber, and spurge-flax (Daphne Gnidium).
    • The whitethroat, Sylvia cinerea: with reference to the materials creating its nest.
    • The whitethroat, Sylvia cinerea: with regards to the materials composing its nest.
    • Canvas linen, produced from flax, useful for sailmaking.
    • Canvas linen, made of flax, utilized for sailmaking.
    • The field-cress or mithridate mustard, Lepidium campestre.
    • In brand new Zealand, L. monogynum; also the latest Zealand flax, Phormium tenax. See Phormium.
    • Same as Lewis's wild flax.
    • Same as toad-flax.
    • identical to untrue flax.
    • The garden tickseed or calliopsis, Coreopsis tinctoria.
    • fiber associated with flax plant that's converted to bond and woven into linen material
    • plant of this genus Linum that is developed for its seeds and for the fibers of its stem
    • A widely cultivated plant, Linum usitatissimum, having pale blue blossoms, seeds that yield linseed oil, and slender stems from which a textile dietary fiber is obtained.
    • A widely cultivated plant, Linum usitatissimum, having pale-blue plants, seeds that yield linseed oil, and slender stems from which a textile fibre is acquired.
    • The good, light-colored textile fiber gotten with this plant.
    • any one of some other flowers for the genus Linum or of comparable or associated genera.
    • A pale grayish yellow.
    • A plant for the genus Linum, specifically Linum usitatissimum, that has an individual, thin stalk, about a foot and a half high, with blue blossoms. Also called linseed, specially when talking about the seeds.
    • The fibers of Linum usitatissimum, cultivated to make linen and related fabrics.
    • A plant of genus Phormium, indigenous to New Zealand, with strap-like leaves to 3 metres long that grow in clumps known as flax shrubs.
    • The field-cress or mithridate mustard, Lepidium campestre.
    • A plant associated with genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, with just one, slender stalk, about a foot and a half high, with blue plants. The dietary fiber of bark is employed in making thread and cloth, known as linen, cambric, grass, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed from the seed.
    • your skin or fibrous the main flax plant, when broken and washed by hatcheling or combing.
    • In New Zealand, L. monogynum; in addition this new Zealand flax, Phormium tenax. See Phormium.
    • The common name for plants of this genus Linum and also for the fiber acquired from the stems of L. usitatissimum.
    • Same as Lewis's crazy flax.
    • one of many flowers of various other genera, mainly resembling typical flax, given that untrue or white flax (Camelina sativa), hill flax (Polygala Senega), toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), brand new Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), which yields a solid dietary fiber, and spurge-flax (Daphne Gnidium).
    • identical to toad-flax.
    • The whitethroat, Sylvia cinerea: with regards to the material creating its nest.
    • identical to false flax.
    • Canvas linen, created from flax, utilized for sailmaking.
    • The garden tickseed or calliopsis, Coreopsis tinctoria.
    • dietary fiber associated with the flax plant that's made into bond and woven into linen fabric
    • plant for the genus Linum that's developed for its seeds and also for the materials of their stem
    • The field-cress or mithridate mustard, Lepidium campestre.
    • In brand new Zealand, L. monogynum; also the latest Zealand flax, Phormium tenax. See Phormium.
    • Same as Lewis's wild flax.
    • just like toad-flax.
    • identical to false flax.
    • The garden tickseed or calliopsis, Coreopsis tinctoria.
    • fibre for the flax plant this is certainly converted to bond and woven into linen material
    • plant regarding the genus Linum that is developed for its seeds and for the materials of their stem
    • The good, light-colored textile fibre acquired using this plant.
    • Any of several other flowers associated with genus Linum or of similar or related genera.
    • A pale grayish yellow.
    • A plant of the genus Linum, especially Linum usitatissimum, which includes an individual, slender stalk, about a foot and a half large, with blue plants. Also called linseed, especially when discussing the seeds.
    • The fibers of Linum usitatissimum, cultivated to create linen and related textiles.
    • A plant for the genus Phormium, indigenous to New Zealand, with strap-like leaves around 3 metres very long that grow in clumps called flax shrubs.
    • A plant for the genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, with just one, thin stalk, about a foot and a half large, with blue plants. The fiber of bark is used to make thread and cloth, known as linen, cambric, yard, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed through the seed.
    • The skin or fibrous an element of the flax plant, whenever damaged and cleaned by hatcheling or combing.
    • the most popular title for flowers for the genus Linum and also for the dietary fiber acquired from the stems of L. usitatissimum.
    • one of the flowers of other genera, mostly resembling typical flax, once the untrue or white flax (Camelina sativa), mountain flax (Polygala Senega), toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), which yields a solid fiber, and spurge-flax (Daphne Gnidium).
    • The whitethroat, Sylvia cinerea: with reference to the materials composing its nest.
    • Canvas linen, made of flax, employed for sailmaking.
    • The field-cress or mithridate mustard, Lepidium campestre.
    • In brand new Zealand, L. monogynum; also the brand new Zealand flax, Phormium tenax. See Phormium.
    • Same as Lewis's wild flax.
    • identical to toad-flax.
    • just like untrue flax.
    • The garden tickseed or calliopsis, Coreopsis tinctoria.
    • fiber associated with flax plant which made into bond and woven into linen fabric
    • plant regarding the genus Linum this is certainly cultivated for its seeds and also for the materials of its stem
    • A widely cultivated plant, Linum usitatissimum, having pale-blue plants, seeds that yield linseed oil, and slender comes from which a textile fibre is obtained.
    • The fine, light-colored textile dietary fiber obtained with this plant.
    • Any of many other flowers associated with the genus Linum or of comparable or relevant genera.
    • A pale grayish yellowish.
    • A plant associated with genus Linum, specially Linum usitatissimum, with a single, thin stalk, about a foot and a half large, with blue flowers. Also known as linseed, especially when referring to the seeds.
    • The fibers of Linum usitatissimum, grown to make linen and associated textiles.
    • A plant of this genus Phormium, native to New Zealand, with strap-like leaves to 3 metres long that grow in clumps known as flax bushes.
    • A plant regarding the genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, which has one, slender stalk, about a foot . 5 large, with blue plants. The dietary fiber of this bark is used in making bond and cloth, called linen, cambric, grass, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed from the seed.
    • your skin or fibrous area of the flax plant, whenever broken and cleansed by hatcheling or combing.
    • the normal title for flowers regarding the genus Linum and also for the fibre gotten through the stems of L. usitatissimum.
    • One of several plants of other genera, mainly resembling common flax, since the false or white flax (Camelina sativa), mountain flax (Polygala Senega), toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), which yields a strong fibre, and spurge-flax (Daphne Gnidium).
    • The whitethroat, Sylvia cinerea: with regards to the material composing its nest.
    • Canvas linen, made from flax, used for sailmaking.
    • A widely cultivated plant, Linum usitatissimum, having pale blue flowers, seeds that yield linseed oil, and slender is due to which a textile fiber is acquired.
    • The field-cress or mithridate mustard, Lepidium campestre.
    • In New Zealand, L. monogynum; also the latest Zealand flax, Phormium tenax. See Phormium.
    • Same as Lewis's crazy flax.
    • identical to toad-flax.
    • Same as false flax.
    • The yard tickseed or calliopsis, Coreopsis tinctoria.
    • fibre associated with flax plant that's made into bond and woven into linen material
    • plant of the genus Linum this is certainly cultivated for the seeds and also for the materials of the stem
    • The fine, light-colored textile fiber acquired using this plant.
    • some of some other plants for the genus Linum or of similar or associated genera.
    • A pale grayish yellow.
    • A widely cultivated plant, Linum usitatissimum, having pale blue plants, seeds that yield linseed oil, and slender is due to which a textile fiber is obtained.
    • A plant associated with the genus Linum, specifically Linum usitatissimum, which has an individual, slender stalk, about a foot and a half large, with blue plants. Also known as linseed, specially when referring to the seeds.
    • The materials of Linum usitatissimum, cultivated which will make linen and relevant textiles.
    • The fine, light-colored textile dietary fiber acquired with this plant.
    • Any of some other flowers for the genus Linum or of similar or associated genera.
    • A plant associated with genus Phormium, native to brand new Zealand, with strap-like leaves to 3 metres long that grow in clumps known as flax bushes.
    • A widely cultivated plant, Linum usitatissimum, having pale-blue flowers, seeds that yield linseed oil, and slender is due to which a textile dietary fiber is gotten.
    • A pale grayish yellow.
    • The good, light-colored textile fibre gotten out of this plant.
    • A plant associated with genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, which includes just one, thin stalk, about a foot . 5 large, with blue blossoms. The fibre of bark is employed for making bond and fabric, called linen, cambric, yard, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed from seed.
    • A plant of the genus Linum, specially Linum usitatissimum, which includes an individual, slim stalk, about a foot and a half large, with blue plants. Also known as linseed, especially when discussing the seeds.
    • Any of other flowers of the genus Linum or of similar or relevant genera.
    • The materials of Linum usitatissimum, grown to create linen and associated fabrics.
    • your skin or fibrous the main flax plant, when damaged and cleansed by hatcheling or combing.
    • A pale grayish yellow.
    • A plant of genus Phormium, indigenous to New Zealand, with strap-like leaves as much as 3 metres long that grow in clumps called flax shrubs.
    • the normal name for plants of genus Linum and for the dietary fiber obtained through the stems of L. usitatissimum.
    • A plant of genus Linum, specifically Linum usitatissimum, which includes a single, slender stalk, about a foot and a half high, with blue blossoms. Also called linseed, especially when talking about the seeds.
    • one of many plants of other genera, mostly resembling common flax, given that false or white flax (Camelina sativa), mountain flax (Polygala Senega), toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), New Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), which yields a good fiber, and spurge-flax (Daphne Gnidium).
    • A plant of this genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, which has an individual, slender stalk, about a foot . 5 large, with blue flowers. The fibre associated with the bark is used to make bond and fabric, known as linen, cambric, grass, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed through the seed.
    • your skin or fibrous the main flax plant, whenever damaged and cleansed by hatcheling or combing.
    • The whitethroat, Sylvia cinerea: with regards to the materials composing its nest.
    • The materials of Linum usitatissimum, cultivated to create linen and related fabrics.
    • the normal title for flowers for the genus Linum and for the fiber acquired from the stems of L. usitatissimum.
    • Canvas linen, produced from flax, utilized for sailmaking.
    • A plant regarding the genus Phormium, indigenous to brand new Zealand, with strap-like leaves as much as 3 metres very long that grow in clumps known as flax bushes.
    • one of the plants of other genera, mostly resembling typical flax, while the false or white flax (Camelina sativa), mountain flax (Polygala Senega), toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), brand new Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), which yields a good fiber, and spurge-flax (Daphne Gnidium).
    • A plant of the genus Linum, esp. the L. usitatissimum, with one, slim stalk, about a foot and a half large, with blue plants. The fiber for the bark can be used for making bond and cloth, known as linen, cambric, grass, lace, etc. Linseed oil is expressed from the seed.
    • The whitethroat, Sylvia cinerea: with regards to the material composing its nest.
    • The skin or fibrous the main flax plant, when broken and cleaned by hatcheling or combing.
    • The field-cress or mithridate mustard, Lepidium campestre.
    • the typical name for flowers of the genus Linum and for the fibre acquired from the stems of L. usitatissimum.
    • In brand new Zealand, L. monogynum; additionally the newest Zealand flax, Phormium tenax. See Phormium.
    • one of many flowers of various other genera, mainly resembling typical flax, given that untrue or white flax (Camelina sativa), hill flax (Polygala Senega), toadflax (Linaria vulgaris), brand new Zealand flax (Phormium tenax), which yields a good fiber, and spurge-flax (Daphne Gnidium).
    • Same as Lewis's wild flax.
    • The whitethroat, Sylvia cinerea: with reference to the materials creating its nest.
    • identical to toad-flax.
    • identical to false flax.
    • Canvas linen, produced from flax, utilized for sailmaking.
    • The garden tickseed or calliopsis, Coreopsis tinctoria.
    • dietary fiber of the flax plant this is certainly changed to bond and woven into linen textile
    • The field-cress or mithridate mustard, Lepidium campestre.
    • plant for the genus Linum which developed for the seeds and for the materials of their stem
    • In brand new Zealand, L. monogynum; also the latest Zealand flax, Phormium tenax. See Phormium.
    • Same as Lewis's crazy flax.
    • just like toad-flax.
    • Canvas linen, made from flax, used for sailmaking.
    • identical to untrue flax.
    • The garden tickseed or calliopsis, Coreopsis tinctoria.
    • The field-cress or mithridate mustard, Lepidium campestre.
    • fibre for the flax plant which changed to bond and woven into linen fabric
    • In brand new Zealand, L. monogynum; additionally this new Zealand flax, Phormium tenax. See Phormium.
    • plant of genus Linum that's developed for its seeds and for the fibers of its stem
    • Same as Lewis's crazy flax.
    • Same as toad-flax.
    • Same as false flax.
    • The garden tickseed or calliopsis, Coreopsis tinctoria.
    • fiber of flax plant that is changed to thread and woven into linen material
    • plant of the genus Linum this is certainly cultivated because of its seeds and also for the fibers of their stem
  • others:
    • to conquer.
    • To beat.
    • to maneuver quickly; “knock” about: as, to flax circular (to go about in a lively or energetic way).
    • to go quickly; “knock” about: because, to flax round (to go about in a lively or lively way).
    • To beat.
    • To move quickly; “knock” about: as, to flax round (to move about in a lively or energetic manner).
    • to conquer.
    • to go rapidly; “knock” about: as, to flax round (to go about in a lively or lively manner).
    • to conquer.
    • to maneuver rapidly; “knock” about: as, to flax round (to go about in a lively or energetic fashion).
    • To beat.
    • to go rapidly; “knock” about: as, to flax round (to go about in a lively or lively fashion).
    • to conquer.
    • To move quickly; “knock” about: as, to flax round (to move about in a lively or energetic manner).
    • to conquer.
    • to maneuver rapidly; “knock” about: because, to flax round (to go about in a lively or lively manner).

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