flatter definition

  • verb-transitive:
    • To supplement exceptionally and often insincerely, particularly in purchase to win benefit.
    • To kindly or gratify the vanity of: "What actually flatters a man is that you believe him really worth flattering” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To portray positively: a photograph that flatters its topic.
    • to exhibit off becomingly or advantageously.
    • to deal with with praise or blandishments; to gratify or make an effort to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • To raise hopes in; to encourage or favorable, but sometimes unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • To portray too positively; to give a too favorable concept of.
    • To compliment exceedingly and sometimes insincerely, especially in order to win benefit.
    • To kindly or gratify the vanity of: "Just What actually flatters a person is you believe him really worth complementing” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To portray favorably: an image that flatters its subject.
    • showing off becomingly or advantageously.
    • To compliment excessively and frequently insincerely, especially in order to win benefit.
    • To kindly or gratify the vanity of: "Exactly What truly flatters a man is you believe him well worth complementing” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To portray positively: an image that flatters its subject.
    • To show off becomingly or advantageously.
    • to take care of with praise or blandishments; to gratify or attempt to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • to boost hopes in; to motivate or positive, but occasionally unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • To portray also positively; to provide a too favorable notion of.
    • to deal with with compliments or blandishments; to gratify or attempt to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • to boost hopes in; to motivate or favorable, but occasionally unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • To portray too favorably; to offer a too favorable notion of.
    • To supplement excessively and often insincerely, particularly in purchase to win favor.
    • To please or gratify the vanity of: "Exactly What actually flatters a man is you think him really worth complementing” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To portray positively: an image that flatters its subject.
    • to exhibit down becomingly or advantageously.
    • To praise exceptionally and sometimes insincerely, especially in order to win favor.
    • To compliment excessively and frequently insincerely, particularly in purchase to win benefit.
    • To compliment extremely and sometimes insincerely, particularly in purchase to win benefit.
    • To compliment overly and frequently insincerely, particularly in order to win benefit.
    • To supplement excessively and frequently insincerely, particularly in purchase to win favor.
    • To praise overly and frequently insincerely, especially in purchase to win benefit.
    • To please or gratify the vanity of: "Just What really flatters a man is that you believe him really worth flattering” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To kindly or gratify the vanity of: "What truly flatters a person is that you believe him worth complementing” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To praise exceptionally and frequently insincerely, particularly in order to win benefit.
    • To please or gratify the vanity of: "Exactly What truly flatters a guy is you believe him well worth flattering” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To kindly or gratify the vanity of: "What actually flatters a person is you think him worth flattering” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To please or gratify the vanity of: "What actually flatters a guy is you believe him worth complementing” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To kindly or gratify the vanity of: "Just What actually flatters a person is you believe him worth flattering” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To portray favorably: an image that flatters its topic.
    • To please or gratify the vanity of: "What really flatters a man is that you think him worth flattering” ( George Bernard Shaw).
    • To portray positively: a photograph that flatters its topic.
    • showing off becomingly or advantageously.
    • To portray positively: a photograph that flatters its subject.
    • To portray positively: an image that flatters its subject.
    • To portray favorably: a photograph that flatters its topic.
    • To portray favorably: an image that flatters its topic.
    • To portray favorably: a photograph that flatters its topic.
    • to demonstrate off becomingly or advantageously.
    • showing down becomingly or advantageously.
    • To show off becomingly or advantageously.
    • showing off becomingly or advantageously.
    • to demonstrate off becomingly or advantageously.
    • to exhibit down becomingly or advantageously.
    • To treat with compliments or blandishments; to gratify or make an effort to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • to boost hopes in; to encourage or favorable, but sometimes unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • To portray also positively; to offer a too positive idea of.
    • To treat with praise or blandishments; to gratify or attempt to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • to take care of with compliments or blandishments; to gratify or make an effort to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • to improve hopes in; to motivate or favorable, but occasionally unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • to deal with with compliments or blandishments; to gratify or attempt to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • To raise hopes in; to motivate or positive, but sometimes unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • To portray too favorably; to provide a too favorable concept of.
    • To portray too favorably; to provide a too favorable concept of.
    • to deal with with praise or blandishments; to gratify or make an effort to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • to boost hopes in; to motivate or favorable, but often unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • To portray also positively; to provide a too favorable idea of.
    • to increase hopes in; to motivate or positive, but often unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • To treat with compliments or blandishments; to gratify or make an effort to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • To portray also favorably; to give a too positive concept of.
    • To raise hopes in; to encourage or favorable, but often unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • to deal with with praise or blandishments; to gratify or make an effort to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • To portray also positively; to offer a too favorable idea of.
    • to boost hopes in; to motivate or positive, but occasionally unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • to take care of with compliments or blandishments; to gratify or try to gratify the self-love or vanity of, esp. by artful and interested commendation or attentions; to blandish; to cajole; to wheedle.
    • To portray also positively; to give a too favorable concept of.
    • to improve hopes in; to encourage or positive, but often unfounded or deceitful, representations.
    • To portray also favorably; to give a too favorable idea of.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • to apply flattery.
    • to make use of flattery or insincere compliments.
    • to apply flattery.
    • to rehearse flattery.
    • To use flattery or insincere praise.
    • to utilize flattery or insincere compliments.
    • To practice flattery.
    • to rehearse flattery.
    • to apply flattery.
    • to apply flattery.
    • to train flattery.
    • to rehearse flattery.
    • to train flattery.
    • To practice flattery.
    • to make use of flattery or insincere compliments.
    • to utilize flattery or insincere praise.
    • to utilize flattery or insincere compliments.
    • to utilize flattery or insincere compliments.
    • To use flattery or insincere praise.
    • to utilize flattery or insincere praise.
    • to make use of flattery or insincere compliments.
    • To use flattery or insincere praise.
  • noun:
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer used by blacksmiths.
    • A die plate for flattening steel into pieces, as in the make of watch springs.
    • A type of set tool used by blacksmiths.
    • a person who flattens, intentionally or accidently. Also flattener.
    • a person who, or whatever, makes level or flattens.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for drawing level pieces, as watch springs, etc.
    • One who or what flattens or makes flat.
    • particularly A hammer with a broad face, utilized by smiths in working level faces.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with an appartment orifice for drawing level strips, in terms of watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • additionally flattener.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer used by blacksmiths.
    • A die plate for flattening material into strips, as with the make of watch springs.
    • a kind of ready tool used by blacksmiths.
    • somebody who flattens, intentionally or accidently. Also flattener.
    • One who, or whatever, makes level or flattens.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer utilized by blacksmiths.
    • A die dish for flattening steel into strips, such as the manufacture of watch springs.
    • A type of ready device employed by blacksmiths.
    • a person who flattens, intentionally or accidently. In addition flattener.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for attracting level pieces, as view springs, etc.
    • One who, or that which, makes flat or flattens.
    • person who or that which flattens or makes flat.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • especially A hammer with an easy face, used by smiths in working flat faces.
    • A drawplate with a thin, rectangular orifice, for drawing level strips, as watch springs, etc.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a-flat orifice for attracting level strips, as for watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • additionally flattener.
    • one that or that which flattens or makes level.
    • Specifically A hammer with a diverse face, employed by smiths in working level faces.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a set orifice for drawing level strips, for watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • Also flattener.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer utilized by blacksmiths.
    • A die dish for flattening material into pieces, like in the manufacture of view springs.
    • a form of set tool utilized by blacksmiths.
    • Someone who flattens, purposely or accidently. Additionally flattener.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer used by blacksmiths.
    • A die plate for flattening steel into strips, as in the manufacture of view springs.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer utilized by blacksmiths.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer utilized by blacksmiths.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer used by blacksmiths.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer utilized by blacksmiths.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer utilized by blacksmiths.
    • A flat-faced swage or hammer employed by blacksmiths.
    • A die dish for flattening metal into pieces, as in the make of watch springs.
    • A die dish for flattening steel into strips, such as the make of view springs.
    • A die plate for flattening material into pieces, such as the manufacture of watch springs.
    • person who, or whatever, tends to make level or flattens.
    • A die dish for flattening metal into pieces, as in the make of watch springs.
    • A die plate for flattening material into pieces, as in the manufacture of watch springs.
    • A die dish for flattening metal into strips, such as the manufacture of watch springs.
    • A type of ready device used by blacksmiths.
    • a form of set tool employed by blacksmiths.
    • a form of ready tool used by blacksmiths.
    • a person who flattens, intentionally or accidently. Additionally flattener.
    • A type of set tool employed by blacksmiths.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • A type of set tool utilized by blacksmiths.
    • a kind of ready device employed by blacksmiths.
    • a person who flattens, purposely or accidently. Also flattener.
    • a kind of set tool utilized by blacksmiths.
    • a person who flattens, intentionally or accidently. Additionally flattener.
    • Someone who flattens, intentionally or accidently. In addition flattener.
    • Someone who flattens, purposely or accidently. Additionally flattener.
    • a person who flattens, intentionally or accidently. Also flattener.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for drawing level strips, as watch springs, etc.
    • an individual who flattens, intentionally or accidently. Additionally flattener.
    • person who, or whatever, makes flat or flattens.
    • a person who, or whatever, makes flat or flattens.
    • One who, or what, makes level or flattens.
    • person who, or that which, makes level or flattens.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • one that, or that which, tends to make flat or flattens.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for attracting flat pieces, as watch springs, etc.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for drawing flat strips, as watch springs, etc.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for drawing level pieces, as watch springs, etc.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for attracting level strips, as watch springs, etc.
    • one that, or whatever, tends to make level or flattens.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • One who or that which flattens or makes flat.
    • person who or that which flattens or tends to make level.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for attracting level strips, as watch springs, etc.
    • One who or what flattens or tends to make level.
    • particularly A hammer with an easy face, utilized by smiths in working flat faces.
    • particularly A hammer with an extensive face, utilized by smiths in working level faces.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a-flat orifice for drawing flat strips, as for watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • particularly A hammer with a broad face, used by smiths in working flat faces.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • a person who, or whatever, tends to make flat or flattens.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a flat orifice for attracting level pieces, in terms of watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a set orifice for attracting level pieces, for watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • Also flattener.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for attracting level pieces, as view springs, etc.
    • Also flattener.
    • a person who or that which flattens or tends to make level.
    • In addition flattener.
    • A flat-faced fulling hammer.
    • a person who or whatever flattens or tends to make flat.
    • Specifically A hammer with an extensive face, used by smiths in working level faces.
    • A drawplate with a narrow, rectangular orifice, for attracting flat pieces, as view springs, etc.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a-flat orifice for attracting level strips, in terms of watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • especially A hammer with a broad face, used by smiths in working flat faces.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a set orifice for drawing level pieces, for watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • In addition flattener.
    • One who or that which flattens or makes flat.
    • Specifically A hammer with a diverse face, used by smiths in working level faces.
    • In addition flattener.
    • a person who or whatever flattens or tends to make flat.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a flat orifice for attracting flat pieces, for watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • especially A hammer with a diverse face, employed by smiths in working flat faces.
    • Also flattener.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a set orifice for attracting level pieces, in terms of watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • One who or whatever flattens or tends to make level.
    • Also flattener.
    • Specifically A hammer with an easy face, used by smiths in working level faces.
    • In wire-drawing, a draw-plate with a-flat orifice for drawing flat pieces, for watch-springs, skirt-wire, etc.
    • additionally flattener.
  • adjective:
    • comparative kind of flat: much more flat
    • comparative as a type of flat: more level
    • relative form of flat: even more level
    • comparative form of level: even more level
    • comparative form of level: even more flat
    • comparative kind of level: even more level
    • comparative as a type of flat: even more flat
    • relative type of level: even more level
    • comparative form of flat: even more level
    • relative as a type of flat: more level
    • comparative form of level: more flat
  • verb:
    • To compliment someone, usually insincerely and sometimes to win favor
    • to boost somebody's vanity by praising them
    • To portray something to advantage.
    • To convey notions of realities which can be considered to be positive towards the hearer without certainty for the truthfulness regarding the notions conveyed.
    • compliments notably dishonestly
    • To supplement somebody, often insincerely and sometimes to win favor
    • to boost someone's vanity by praising them
    • To portray one thing to advantage.
    • to mention notions associated with the realities which can be thought to be positive to your hearer without certainty of the truthfulness of the notions conveyed.
    • To supplement somebody, frequently insincerely and quite often to win favour
    • to improve another person's vanity by praising them
    • To portray some thing to advantage.
    • to mention notions associated with the details which can be considered to be positive into the hearer without certainty associated with the truthfulness of the notions conveyed.
    • compliments notably dishonestly
    • praise notably dishonestly
    • To supplement someone, frequently insincerely and often to win favor
    • To enhance somebody's vanity by praising them
    • To portray anything to benefit.
    • to mention notions of this realities which can be considered to be positive to your hearer without certainty regarding the truthfulness associated with notions conveyed.
    • To compliment some one, usually insincerely and sometimes to win favor
    • To supplement somebody, usually insincerely and quite often to win favour
    • to boost someone's vanity by praising them
    • to boost somebody's vanity by praising them
    • To praise somebody, usually insincerely and quite often to win favor
    • To supplement somebody, usually insincerely and often to win favor
    • To praise somebody, frequently insincerely and often to win favor
    • To portray some thing to advantage.
    • To supplement somebody, usually insincerely and often to win favour
    • To praise someone, frequently insincerely and sometimes to win favour
    • To enhance a person's vanity by praising all of them
    • To enhance a person's vanity by praising all of them
    • To portray one thing to advantage.
    • to share notions of facts which can be thought to be favorable on hearer without certainty for the truthfulness associated with notions conveyed.
    • To convey notions for the facts which can be thought to be positive towards hearer without certainty of truthfulness associated with notions conveyed.
    • To portray one thing to advantage.
    • To portray anything to benefit.
    • to improve another person's vanity by praising all of them
    • To enhance somebody's vanity by praising them
    • To convey notions for the details being considered to be favorable towards the hearer without certainty of this truthfulness for the notions conveyed.
    • To convey notions associated with the details which can be thought to be favorable towards the hearer without certainty associated with truthfulness associated with notions conveyed.
    • To portray something to benefit.
    • To portray one thing to benefit.
    • to share notions regarding the facts which can be considered to be positive towards hearer without certainty associated with truthfulness of the notions conveyed.
    • to mention notions of the facts that are thought to be favorable to your hearer without certainty associated with truthfulness of the notions conveyed.
    • To enhance somebody's vanity by praising all of them
    • To portray one thing to advantage.
    • To convey notions of the realities that are believed to be favorable into the hearer without certainty of the truthfulness of notions conveyed.
    • praise significantly dishonestly
    • praise notably dishonestly
    • compliments significantly dishonestly
    • praise notably dishonestly
    • praise significantly dishonestly
    • compliments somewhat dishonestly
    • praise somewhat dishonestly
    • praise notably dishonestly
  • others:
    • To kindly or gratify, or look for to please or gratify, by praise, specially undue praise, or by obsequious attentions, distribution, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (a person) with a view to gain some benefit.
    • to make self-complacency or a sense of private gratification in; please; appeal: since, to feel flattered by approval.
    • To persuade of a thing that gives pleasure or pleasure; provide support to; specifically, to offer pleasing but untrue impressions or support to.
    • In order to make appear better than the truth warrants: as, the portrait flatters its subject.
    • to utilize language intended to gratify the vanity or self-love of people; make use of excessive compliments.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To please or gratify, or seek to kindly or gratify, by praise, particularly excessive praise, or by obsequious attentions, submitting, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (someone) with a view to get some benefit.
    • to make self-complacency or a feeling of individual satisfaction in; please; charm: since, to feel flattered by approval.
    • To sway of something that provides satisfaction or pleasure; offer encouragement to; specially, to give pleasing but false impressions or support to.
    • In order to make appear much better than the reality warrants: because, the portrait flatters its subject.
    • to utilize language designed to gratify the vanity or self-love of someone; use excessive praise.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To please or gratify, or look for to kindly or gratify, by praise, specially undue praise, or by obsequious attentions, distribution, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (an individual) with a view to achieve some advantage.
    • to make self-complacency or a feeling of personal satisfaction in; please; charm: because, to feel flattered by approval.
    • To persuade of something offers enjoyment or satisfaction; give reassurance to; specifically, to offer pleasing but false impressions or support to.
    • to create appear a lot better than the fact warrants: as, the portrait flatters its topic.
    • to make use of language intended to gratify the vanity or self-love of you; make use of undue praise.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To please or gratify, or seek to please or gratify, by compliments, specially excessive praise, or by obsequious attentions, submitting, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (people) with a view to get some advantage.
    • To kindly or gratify, or seek to kindly or gratify, by praise, specially undue compliments, or by obsequious attentions, submitting, imitation, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (an individual) with a view to achieve some benefit.
    • To produce self-complacency or a feeling of private satisfaction in; please; allure: since, to feel flattered by endorsement.
    • To please or gratify, or look for to kindly or gratify, by compliments, specially excessive compliments, or by obsequious attentions, submission, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (someone) with a view to gain some advantage.
    • to create self-complacency or a sense of individual gratification in; please; allure: because, to feel flattered by endorsement.
    • to create self-complacency or a sense of individual satisfaction in; please; appeal: as, to feel flattered by endorsement.
    • To convince of something that provides pleasure or pleasure; provide reassurance to; specially, to offer pleasing but untrue impressions or support to.
    • To convince of a thing that offers pleasure or satisfaction; provide reassurance to; especially, to give pleasing but untrue impressions or reassurance to.
    • To convince of a thing that gives pleasure or satisfaction; give encouragement to; specially, to give pleasing but false impressions or encouragement to.
    • To kindly or gratify, or seek to please or gratify, by praise, specifically excessive praise, or by obsequious attentions, submitting, imitation, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (a person) with a view to achieve some benefit.
    • In order to make appear better than the reality warrants: as, the portrait flatters its subject.
    • to make self-complacency or a feeling of private satisfaction in; please; allure: because, to feel flattered by approval.
    • To make appear better than the reality warrants: since, the portrait flatters its subject.
    • to utilize language designed to gratify the vanity or self-love of someone; utilize excessive compliments.
    • In order to make appear better than the fact warrants: as, the portrait flatters its subject.
    • To kindly or gratify, or look for to kindly or gratify, by praise, particularly undue compliments, or by obsequious attentions, submission, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (a person) with a view to gain some benefit.
    • to make use of language intended to gratify the vanity or self-love of an individual; utilize excessive praise.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To persuade of something that provides pleasure or satisfaction; give reassurance to; specially, to give pleasing but false impressions or encouragement to.
    • to utilize language meant to gratify the vanity or self-love of someone; use undue praise.
    • to produce appear better than the reality warrants: because, the portrait flatters its topic.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To kindly or gratify, or seek to please or gratify, by compliments, especially excessive praise, or by obsequious attentions, submission, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (someone) with a view to achieve some advantage.
    • to create self-complacency or a sense of individual satisfaction in; please; charm: because, to feel flattered by endorsement.
    • to utilize language meant to gratify the vanity or self-love of a person; make use of excessive compliments.
    • to make self-complacency or a sense of private satisfaction in; please; charm: because, to feel flattered by approval.
    • To please or gratify, or seek to kindly or gratify, by praise, particularly undue compliments, or by obsequious attentions, distribution, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (a person) with a view to achieve some benefit.
    • To convince of something that offers pleasure or pleasure; give support to; specifically, to offer pleasing but false impressions or encouragement to.
    • To convince of something which gives satisfaction or satisfaction; offer support to; specifically, to give pleasing but false impressions or reassurance to.
    • To flutter; float.
    • to create self-complacency or a feeling of private satisfaction in; please; allure: since, to feel flattered by endorsement.
    • to help make appear a lot better than the truth warrants: as, the portrait flatters its topic.
    • to help make appear much better than the truth warrants: because, the portrait flatters its topic.
    • To convince of something that gives pleasure or satisfaction; give encouragement to; specifically, to provide pleasing but false impressions or encouragement to.
    • to make use of language designed to gratify the vanity or self-love of a person; use excessive praise.
    • to utilize language meant to gratify the vanity or self-love of one; utilize excessive praise.
    • which will make appear better than the reality warrants: as, the portrait flatters its topic.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To use language designed to gratify the vanity or self-love of people; make use of undue compliments.
    • To flutter; float.
    • To please or gratify, or seek to kindly or gratify, by praise, specially excessive compliments, or by obsequious attentions, distribution, replica, etc.; play upon the vanity or self-love of (an individual) with a view to get some advantage.
    • To produce self-complacency or a feeling of private satisfaction in; please; appeal: as, to feel flattered by endorsement.
    • To persuade of a thing that gives enjoyment or pleasure; give reassurance to; specifically, to provide pleasing but untrue impressions or reassurance to.
    • To make appear a lot better than the fact warrants: since, the portrait flatters its subject.
    • to make use of language intended to gratify the vanity or self-love of people; utilize excessive compliments.
    • To flutter; float.

Related Sources

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