finite definition

  • adjective:
    • Having bounds; restricted: a finite selection of choices; our finite fossil gasoline reserves.
    • Existing, persisting, or suffering for a finite time only; impermanent.
    • Mathematics Being neither boundless nor infinitesimal.
    • Mathematics Having an optimistic or unfavorable numerical value; perhaps not zero.
    • Mathematics potential to attain or meet or exceed by counting. Applied of several.
    • Mathematics Having a finite quantity of elements. Applied of a set.
    • Grammar Of or regarding the types of a verb that can happen independently in a primary term hence can officially show differences directly, number, tense, mood, and sound, frequently through conjugation, as the verb views in She sees the sign.
    • restricted, constrained by bounds, impermanent
    • Having a limit; limited in quantity, degree, or capability; bounded; -- in opposition to boundless
    • of verbs; concerning kinds of the verb that are restricted with time by a tense and (usually) show agreement with number and person
    • bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal degree
    • Having bounds; restricted: a finite variety of alternatives; our finite fossil gas reserves.
    • Having bounds; limited: a finite selection of choices; our finite fossil fuel reserves.
    • Having bounds; limited: a finite variety of alternatives; our finite fossil fuel reserves.
    • Having bounds; limited: a finite list of choices; our finite fossil fuel reserves.
    • Having bounds; restricted: a finite variety of choices; our finite fossil gasoline reserves.
    • Having bounds; restricted: a finite listing of choices; our finite fossil fuel reserves.
    • Existing, persisting, or suffering for a restricted time just; impermanent.
    • Existing, persisting, or suffering for a finite time only; impermanent.
    • Existing, persisting, or enduring for a finite time just; impermanent.
    • current, persisting, or enduring for a finite time just; impermanent.
    • Existing, persisting, or enduring for a finite time only; impermanent.
    • Mathematics Being neither countless nor infinitesimal.
    • Mathematics becoming neither limitless nor infinitesimal.
    • Mathematics Being neither countless nor infinitesimal.
    • Mathematics getting neither infinite nor infinitesimal.
    • Mathematics Having an optimistic or negative numerical worth; not zero.
    • Mathematics Having a confident or bad numerical value; maybe not zero.
    • Mathematics Having a confident or bad numerical worth; not zero.
    • Mathematics Having a positive or unfavorable numerical value; not zero.
    • Mathematics potential to attain or meet or exceed by counting. Applied of several.
    • Mathematics potential to attain or go beyond by counting. Applied of lots.
    • Mathematics viable to achieve or exceed by counting. Applied of several.
    • Mathematics Having a small few elements. Applied of a set.
    • Mathematics Having a limited amount of elements. Applied of a set.
    • Mathematics Having a limited amount of elements. Applied of a set.
    • Grammar Of or regarding the forms of a verb that may happen by themselves in a main term which can officially express differences face-to-face, number, tense, feeling, and voice, usually in the shape of conjugation, because the verb views in She views the sign.
    • Grammar Of or regarding any of the forms of a verb that will take place independently in a main clause and therefore can formally show differences directly, number, tense, feeling, and sound, often by way of conjugation, given that verb views in She sees the sign.
    • Grammar Of or relating to some of the types of a verb that will take place on their own in a principal term which can officially show differences face-to-face, quantity, anxious, mood, and voice, often in the shape of conjugation, as the verb views in She sees the indication.
    • Limited, constrained by bounds, impermanent
    • Limited, constrained by bounds, impermanent
    • Having a limit; restricted in amount, degree, or ability; bounded; -- against infinite
    • Having a limit; restricted in amount, degree, or ability; bounded; -- against infinite
    • Existing, persisting, or suffering for a limited time just; impermanent.
    • Mathematics becoming neither unlimited nor infinitesimal.
    • Mathematics Having an optimistic or unfavorable numerical value; maybe not zero.
    • Mathematics viable to reach or go beyond by counting. Applied of lots.
    • Mathematics becoming neither infinite nor infinitesimal.
    • Mathematics potential to achieve or surpass by counting. Used of several.
    • Mathematics Having a small wide range of elements. Applied of a collection.
    • Mathematics Having a restricted range elements. Applied of a collection.
    • Limited, constrained by bounds, impermanent
    • Mathematics Having an optimistic or negative numerical value; perhaps not zero.
    • Grammar Of or regarding the kinds of a verb that will happen on their own in a main term which can officially show differences personally, quantity, anxious, mood, and sound, often in the shape of conjugation, given that verb views in She sees the indication.
    • Mathematics Possible to achieve or exceed by counting. Used of several.
    • Having a limit; restricted in amount, level, or capability; bounded; -- opposed to infinite
    • Limited, constrained by bounds, impermanent
    • Mathematics Having a finite quantity of elements. Applied of a collection.
    • of verbs; associated with kinds of the verb which can be limited with time by a tense and (usually) show agreement with quantity and person
    • Grammar Of or associated with the forms of a verb that may occur independently in a main clause and that can formally express distinctions in person, quantity, anxious, state of mind, and sound, usually in the form of conjugation, while the verb views in She sees the sign.
    • Having a limit; limited in quantity, level, or capability; bounded; -- in opposition to infinite
    • bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent
    • Grammar Of or associated with some of the forms of a verb that will take place on their own in a main term and therefore can officially show differences face-to-face, quantity, anxious, feeling, and voice, often by means of conjugation, as verb sees in She sees the sign.
    • Limited, constrained by bounds, impermanent
    • Limited, constrained by bounds, impermanent
    • of verbs; concerning types of the verb which are limited with time by a tense and (usually) show arrangement with number and individual
    • Having a limit; restricted in amount, level, or ability; bounded; -- against infinite
    • Having a limit; limited in volume, level, or capability; bounded; -- in opposition to limitless
    • bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent
    • of verbs; regarding types of the verb which are restricted over time by a tense and (usually) show contract with number and person
    • of verbs; concerning kinds of the verb which can be limited over time by a tense and (usually) show contract with number and person
    • bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal degree
    • bounded or restricted in magnitude or spatial or temporal level
    • of verbs; regarding kinds of the verb that are restricted over time by a tense and (usually) show agreement with number and individual
    • of verbs; regarding types of the verb which can be restricted in time by a tense and (usually) show contract with number and person
    • bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal degree
    • bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal level
  • noun:
    • A finite thing.
    • whatever is finite; finite things collectively: used just with the definite article.
    • A finite thing.
    • A finite thing.
    • A finite thing.
    • That which is finite; finite things collectively: used only with the definite article.
    • A finite thing.
    • whatever is finite; finite things collectively: made use of only with the definite article.
    • A finite thing.
    • A finite thing.
    • what is finite; finite things collectively: utilized just with the definite article.
    • whatever is finite; finite things collectively: utilized just with the definite article.
    • whatever is finite; finite things collectively: used only with the definite article.
    • whatever is finite; finite things collectively: made use of just with the definite article.
  • others:
    • Not also great nor also little to-be obviously vulnerable of dimension, whether measurable by us or perhaps not; not unlimited nor infinitesimal.
    • The following are the unique significations associated with word: As put on a class or integer quantity, capable of being entirely counted: this is the fundamental meaning. This difference between a finite and an infinite course is vital, while there is a peculiar mode of reasoning, known as by logicians reasoning by transposed volume, which will be appropriate to finite classes alone. These syllogism is a good example: “Every Hottentot kills a Hottentot; but no Hottentot is killed by more than one Hottentot; ergo, every Hottentot is killed by a Hottentot.” If because of the Hottentots is here meant a course of which a complete census could be taken, this summary needs to be true, offered the premises are true. If the years of Hottentots tend to be everlasting, each Hottentot might eliminate one of his true children, yet some Hottentots might perish all-natural fatalities. Reasoning by transposed volume is vital into the higher arithmetic and algebra; and therefore in these branches of mathematics the distinction between finite and countless classes is vital.
    • As placed on constant quantity, smaller than a suitably plumped for finite number multiplied in to the unit of measurement, and larger than a suitably plumped for finite number divided by the unit of dimension.
    • In sentence structure, restricted to person; individual; strictly spoken; not infinitival nor participial.
    • at the mercy of limitations or conditions, such as those of room, time, circumstances, and also the laws and regulations of nature: as, a finite being; finite presence or extent.
    • Of or pertaining or regarding finite beings: as, finite interests or interests.
    • In math, an important is said to be expressed in finite terms when it is expressed without turn to an infinite series, even though it are expressed in the shape of exponential, elliptic, or Abelian functions that are synonymous with boundless show; but regularly expressions concerning greater kinds of features versus exponential and trigonometric are omitted.
    • To limit; fix the restrictions of.
    • perhaps not also great nor also tiny becoming obviously prone of dimension, whether measurable by us or perhaps not; maybe not limitless nor infinitesimal.
    • maybe not too great nor too small is naturally prone of dimension, whether measurable by united states or perhaps not; maybe not endless nor infinitesimal.
    • listed below are the unique significations associated with term: As applied to a course or integer number, effective at becoming entirely counted: this is the fundamental meaning. This distinction between a finite and an infinite course is essential, because there is a peculiar mode of reasoning, known as by logicians reasoning by transposed volume, which is applicable to finite courses alone. The following syllogism is a good example: “Every Hottentot eliminates a Hottentot; but no Hottentot is killed by several Hottentot; hence, every Hottentot is killed by a Hottentot.” If by the Hottentots has arrived meant a class of which a complete census might be taken, this conclusion must certanly be true, supplied the premises tend to be real. If the years of Hottentots are everlasting, each Hottentot might kill one of his true kiddies, yet some Hottentots might die natural fatalities. Reasoning by transposed amount is indispensable in the greater arithmetic and algebra; and consequently in these limbs of mathematics the distinction between finite and limitless courses is vital.
    • The following are the special significations of the word: As applied to a class or integer number, capable of being completely counted: this is the fundamental meaning. This distinction between a finite and an infinite class is very important, because there is a peculiar mode of reasoning, called by logicians reasoning by transposed quantity, which is applicable to finite classes alone. The following syllogism is an example: “Every Hottentot kills a Hottentot; but no Hottentot is killed by more than one Hottentot; hence, every Hottentot is killed by a Hottentot.” If by the Hottentots is here meant a class of which a complete census might be taken, this conclusion must be true, provided the premises are true. But if the generations of Hottentots are everlasting, each Hottentot might kill one of his children, and yet some Hottentots might die natural deaths. Reasoning by transposed quantity is indispensable in the higher arithmetic and algebra; and consequently in these branches of mathematics the distinction between finite and infinite classes is very important.
    • As placed on constant amount, smaller compared to a suitably chosen finite number multiplied in to the product of dimension, and bigger than a suitably opted for finite number divided by the unit of measurement.
    • In grammar, limited by individual; individual; purely spoken; not infinitival nor participial.
    • at the mercy of limitations or problems, like those of room, time, situations, plus the laws and regulations of nature: as, a finite becoming; finite presence or timeframe.
    • Of or pertaining or associated with finite beings: because, finite passions or interests.
    • As put on constant volume, smaller compared to a suitably chosen finite number multiplied into the device of dimension, and bigger than a suitably selected finite number split because of the product of measurement.
    • In math, an integrated is considered expressed in finite terms when it is expressed without turn to an infinite show, even though it might expressed in the form of exponential, elliptic, or Abelian functions that are similar to unlimited show; but frequently expressions concerning greater forms of functions compared to the exponential and trigonometric are excluded.
    • In sentence structure, tied to person; individual; purely spoken; maybe not infinitival nor participial.
    • at the mercy of limitations or problems, like those of area, time, situations, plus the rules of nature: as, a finite becoming; finite presence or period.
    • To limit; fix the limits of.
    • maybe not too great nor also little to-be naturally susceptible of measurement, whether measurable by us or otherwise not; not countless nor infinitesimal.
    • Of or relating or relating to finite beings: since, finite passions or interests.
    • listed here are the special significations of the term: As applied to a class or integer number, with the capacity of becoming completely counted: this is the fundamental meaning. This distinction between a finite and an infinite course is vital, since there is a peculiar mode of reasoning, known as by logicians reasoning by transposed volume, that will be applicable to finite classes alone. The next syllogism is an illustration: “Every Hottentot eliminates a Hottentot; but no Hottentot is killed by more than one Hottentot; for this reason, every Hottentot is killed by a Hottentot.” If because of the Hottentots is here now meant a course which an entire census could be taken, this conclusion must be real, offered the premises tend to be real. However years of Hottentots are everlasting, each Hottentot might kill one of is own children, and yet some Hottentots might die normal deaths. Thinking by transposed amount is indispensable inside higher arithmetic and algebra; and therefore during these limbs of mathematics the distinction between finite and infinite courses is very important.
    • In mathematics, an important is said to be expressed in finite terms if it is expressed without turn to an infinite show, even though it might expressed through exponential, elliptic, or Abelian features that are similar to countless series; but often expressions concerning greater forms of functions as compared to exponential and trigonometric tend to be excluded.
    • Not also great nor too small is obviously vulnerable of measurement, whether measurable by us or perhaps not; not boundless nor infinitesimal.
    • As placed on constant quantity, smaller compared to a suitably plumped for finite quantity multiplied in to the unit of dimension, and larger than a suitably chosen finite number split by the device of measurement.
    • In grammar, restricted to individual; individual; strictly spoken; not infinitival nor participial.
    • The following are the special significations of this term: As applied to a class or integer quantity, effective at becoming totally counted: this is actually the fundamental definition. This difference between a finite and an infinite course is vital, because there is a peculiar mode of thinking, called by logicians reasoning by transposed quantity, which will be applicable to finite classes alone. Here syllogism is a good example: “Every Hottentot kills a Hottentot; but no Hottentot is killed by several Hottentot; therefore, every Hottentot is killed by a Hottentot.” If because of the Hottentots will be here meant a class that a whole census may be taken, this summary must certanly be real, offered the premises are real. If the generations of Hottentots are everlasting, each Hottentot might kill one of is own kids, but some Hottentots might perish normal fatalities. Reasoning by transposed volume is vital inside higher arithmetic and algebra; and consequently within these limbs of math the difference between finite and unlimited courses is very important.
    • To restrict; fix the restrictions of.
    • at the mercy of limitations or problems, like those of room, time, circumstances, therefore the guidelines of nature: as, a finite being; finite existence or extent.
    • As put on constant amount, smaller than a suitably opted for finite number multiplied in to the product of measurement, and bigger than a suitably selected finite number split because of the device of measurement.
    • Of or relating or regarding finite beings: since, finite passions or interests.
    • In sentence structure, tied to person; private; purely verbal; maybe not infinitival nor participial.
    • perhaps not also great nor too small become obviously prone of measurement, whether measurable by us or otherwise not; maybe not unlimited nor infinitesimal.
    • In mathematics, an integral is reported to be expressed in finite terms if it is expressed without turn to an infinite show, even though it might expressed by means of exponential, elliptic, or Abelian functions which are synonymous with countless series; but regularly expressions concerning greater forms of functions as compared to exponential and trigonometric are excluded.
    • susceptible to limits or circumstances, like those of area, time, situations, additionally the regulations of nature: as, a finite being; finite presence or duration.
    • perhaps not too great nor too little is normally vulnerable of measurement, whether measurable by us or not; perhaps not infinite nor infinitesimal.
    • The following are the special significations of the word: As applied to a class or integer number, capable of being completely counted: this is the fundamental meaning. This distinction between a finite and an infinite class is very important, because there is a peculiar mode of reasoning, called by logicians reasoning by transposed quantity, which is applicable to finite classes alone. The following syllogism is an example: “Every Hottentot kills a Hottentot; but no Hottentot is killed by more than one Hottentot; hence, every Hottentot is killed by a Hottentot.” If by the Hottentots is here meant a class of which a complete census might be taken, this conclusion must be true, provided the premises are true. But if the generations of Hottentots are everlasting, each Hottentot might kill one of his children, and yet some Hottentots might die natural deaths. Reasoning by transposed quantity is indispensable in the higher arithmetic and algebra; and consequently in these branches of mathematics the distinction between finite and infinite classes is very important.
    • listed below are the special significations of word: As put on a class or integer quantity, capable of becoming completely counted: this is basically the fundamental definition. This difference between a finite and an infinite course is very important, since there is a peculiar mode of reasoning, called by logicians reasoning by transposed amount, that will be appropriate to finite courses alone. Here syllogism is an example: “Every Hottentot kills a Hottentot; but no Hottentot is killed by several Hottentot; thus, every Hottentot is killed by a Hottentot.” If because of the Hottentots is here now meant a course that a whole census could be taken, this conclusion must be true, offered the premises are real. If the generations of Hottentots are everlasting, each Hottentot might kill one of his young ones, yet some Hottentots might perish natural fatalities. Thinking by transposed quantity is indispensable in higher arithmetic and algebra; and consequently in these limbs of mathematics the distinction between finite and boundless courses is very important.
    • Of or relating or regarding finite beings: since, finite interests or passions.
    • As applied to constant volume, smaller than a suitably chosen finite number multiplied into the product of dimension, and bigger than a suitably selected finite quantity split by the unit of dimension.
    • In mathematics, an important is said to be expressed in finite terms when it's expressed without resort to an infinite series, even though it is expressed through exponential, elliptic, or Abelian features which are similar to unlimited series; but usually expressions involving greater types of features compared to the exponential and trigonometric tend to be excluded.
    • As put on constant amount, smaller compared to a suitably plumped for finite number multiplied in to the product of dimension, and larger than a suitably plumped for finite number split because of the device of measurement.
    • In grammar, limited by person; private; purely verbal; perhaps not infinitival nor participial.
    • In sentence structure, limited by individual; personal; strictly verbal; not infinitival nor participial.
    • susceptible to limits or circumstances, like those of area, time, situations, while the laws of nature: as, a finite being; finite existence or extent.
    • To limit; fix the limitations of.
    • Subject to limits or problems, like those of area, time, circumstances, plus the regulations of nature: as, a finite becoming; finite presence or length of time.
    • Of or pertaining or associated with finite beings: because, finite passions or interests.
    • Of or relating or associated with finite beings: because, finite interests or passions.
    • In mathematics, an integral is reported to be expressed in finite terms when it's expressed without resort to an infinite series, although it might expressed through exponential, elliptic, or Abelian functions which are synonymous with limitless series; but regularly expressions involving higher kinds of functions compared to exponential and trigonometric are excluded.
    • In mathematics, a built-in is considered expressed in finite terms when it is expressed without resort to an infinite series, though it might be expressed by means of exponential, elliptic, or Abelian functions which are synonymous with unlimited show; but usually expressions involving higher kinds of functions compared to the exponential and trigonometric tend to be excluded.
    • To restrict; fix the restrictions of.
    • To limit; fix the limitations of.
    • To limit; fix the limits of.

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