filch definition

  • verb-transitive:
    • To simply take (something, specially some thing of little worth) in a furtive fashion; snitch. See Synonyms at steal.
    • To just take (something, especially some thing of small worth) in a furtive way; snitch. See Synonyms at take.
    • To take or take privily (generally, whatever is of small value); to pilfer.
    • To take and take privily (generally, what is of small worth); to pilfer.
    • To simply take (anything, specifically something of small price) in a furtive manner; snitch. See Synonyms at take.
    • To take and take privily (commonly, what is of little value); to pilfer.
    • To simply take (something, specially some thing of little worth) in a furtive way; snitch. See Synonyms at take.
    • To take and take privily (commonly, that which is of small price); to pilfer.
    • To simply take (something, particularly anything of small worth) in a furtive way; snitch. See Synonyms at steal.
    • To take and take privily (frequently, that which is of little worth); to pilfer.
    • To just take (some thing, specially one thing of little value) in a furtive way; snitch. See Synonyms at take.
    • To just take (one thing, specifically one thing of little value) in a furtive way; snitch. See Synonyms at take.
    • To just take (one thing, particularly one thing of small price) in a furtive manner; snitch. See Synonyms at steal.
    • To steal or take privily (commonly, whatever is of little value); to pilfer.
    • To steal or take privily (generally, that which is of small worth); to pilfer.
    • To take and take privily (generally, that which is of little price); to pilfer.
  • verb:
    • To steal, to illegally take control of.
    • To steal, to illegally just take ownership of.
    • make off with belongings of other individuals
    • To steal, to illegally just take possession of.
    • make off with belongings of others
    • make off with possessions of others
    • To steal, to illegally take control of.
    • make off with belongings of other individuals
    • To steal, to illegally take ownership of.
    • make off with possessions of other individuals
    • To take, to illegally simply take control of.
    • To steal, to illegally take possession of.
    • To steal, to illegally just take possession of.
    • make down with possessions of others
    • make down with belongings of other individuals
    • make off with belongings of others
  • others:
    • To steal, particularly in a small, sly way; pilfer; just take from another on a petty scale, when it comes to method of getting something special need, or in an underhand means, as by breach of trust or good-faith.
    • To take, especially in a small, sly means; pilfer; simply take from another on a petty scale, when it comes to availability of a present-day need, or perhaps in an underhand method, as by infraction of trust or good faith.
    • To take, especially in a small, sly means; pilfer; take from another on a petty scale, when it comes to availability of something special need, or perhaps in an underhand means, as by breach of trust or good-faith.
    • To steal, especially in a small, sly means; pilfer; simply take from another on a petty scale, as for the way to obtain a present need, or in an underhand method, as by infraction of trust or good faith.
    • To steal, especially in a tiny, sly way; pilfer; simply take from another on a petty scale, are you aware that availability of a present-day need, or perhaps in an underhand means, as by infraction of trust or good-faith.
    • To take, particularly in a tiny, sly way; pilfer; simply take from another on a petty scale, as for the supply of a present need, or perhaps in an underhand way, as by infraction of trust or good-faith.
    • To take, particularly in a tiny, sly method; pilfer; just take from another on a petty scale, are you aware that way to obtain something special need, or in an underhand way, as by infraction of trust or good faith.
    • To steal, especially in a tiny, sly way; pilfer; take from another on a petty scale, when it comes to way to obtain a present-day need, or in an underhand way, as by violation of trust or good-faith.
  • noun:
    • A stick with a hook at the conclusion, utilized in filching articles from house windows, clothes-lines, etc.
    • A stick with a hook by the end, used in filching articles from windows, clothes-lines, etc.
    • An act of theft; in addition, finished . taken.
    • a person who filches or perhaps is directed at filching; a filcher.
    • A stick with a hook at the end, used in filching articles from windows, clothes-lines, etc.
    • An act of theft; in addition, finished . taken.
    • one that filches or is given to filching; a filcher.
    • An act of theft; also, the thing stolen.
    • person who filches or perhaps is provided to filching; a filcher.
    • A stick with a hook at the end, used in filching articles from house windows, clothes-lines, etc.
    • An act of theft; additionally, the thing taken.
    • One who filches or perhaps is given to filching; a filcher.
    • A stick with a hook at the conclusion, used in filching articles from house windows, clothes-lines, etc.
    • An act of theft; also, the one thing stolen.
    • one that filches or perhaps is provided to filching; a filcher.
    • A stick with a hook at the end, used in filching articles from windows, clothes-lines, etc.
    • An act of theft; also, finished . stolen.
    • A stick with a hook at the conclusion, used in filching articles from house windows, clothes-lines, etc.
    • A stick with a hook at the end, used in filching articles from windows, clothes-lines, etc.
    • one that filches or perhaps is given to filching; a filcher.
    • An act of theft; also, the one thing taken.
    • one that filches or is fond of filching; a filcher.
    • An act of theft; additionally, the fact taken.
    • person who filches or perhaps is fond of filching; a filcher.

Related Sources

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