fiber definition

  • noun:
    • A slender, elongated, threadlike object or framework.
    • Botany among the elongated, thick-walled cells that provide strength and help to grow structure.
    • Anatomy the filaments constituting the extracellular matrix of connective tissue.
    • Anatomy any one of various elongated cells or threadlike frameworks, especially a muscle fibre or a nerve dietary fiber.
    • a normal or artificial filament, since cotton or nylon, effective at being spun into yarn.
    • Material made from these types of filaments.
    • Something that provides compound or surface.
    • Essential character: "stirred the deeper fibers of my nature” ( Oscar Wilde).
    • Basic energy or toughness; fortitude: with a lack of moral fibre.
    • Coarse, indigestible plant matter, consisting primarily of polysaccharides including cellulose, that after consumed stimulates intestinal peristalsis. Also referred to as bulk, roughage.
    • A single elongated bit of confirmed product, approximately round in cross-section, usually twisted with other materials to make thread.
    • A material in the shape of fibers.
    • A material whoever size are at least 1000 times its width.
    • fiber.
    • Moral strength and resolve.
    • The preimage of a given part of the range of a map.
    • A kind of lightweight thread of execution.
    • among the fine, threadlike portions of which the tissues of plants and creatures are in part constituted.
    • A slender, elongated, threadlike object or construction.
    • Botany one of several elongated, thick-walled cells that provide strength and assistance to grow structure.
    • Anatomy the filaments constituting the extracellular matrix of connective tissue.
    • Any fine, slim bond, or threadlike compound; ; especially, one of many slim rootlets of a plant.
    • Anatomy Any of different elongated cells or threadlike frameworks, specifically a muscle fibre or a nerve fibre.
    • the inherent complex of characteristics that determine a person's moral and ethical actions and responses; sinew; energy; toughness.
    • a broad title when it comes to raw product, eg cotton, flax, hemp, etc., found in textile manufactures.
    • A natural or artificial filament, as of cotton fiber or plastic, effective at becoming spun into yarn.
    • Material made from these types of filaments.
    • that percentage of food composed of carbohydrates that are entirely or partly indigestible, including cellulose or pectin; it may be in an insoluble or a soluble form. It provides bulk into solid waste and encourages peristalsis within the bowel. It is discovered particularly in grains, fruits, and veggies. Discover some medical research which indicates that diets full of fibre lessen the risk of a cancerous colon and minimize cholesterol levels within the blood. Additionally, it is known as soluble fbre, roughage, or volume.
    • Something that provides substance or texture.
    • a leatherlike material produced by compressing levels of report or cloth.
    • Crucial personality: "stirred the deeper fibers of my nature” ( Oscar Wilde).
    • A thread or filament; any good thread-like part of a substance, as an individual normal filament of wool, cotton fiber, silk, or asbestos, one of the thin terminal origins of a plant, a drawn-out bond of glass, etc.
    • In a collective feeling, a filamentous material; a conglomeration of thread-like tissue, including is out there in animals and flowers usually; more usually, any pet, vegetable, or mineral compound the constituent elements of which may be separated into or regularly form threads for textile materials and/or want: as, muscular or vegetable dietary fiber; the fiber of wool; silk, cotton fiber, or jute fiber; asbestos fiber.
    • fundamental energy or toughness; fortitude: with a lack of ethical fibre.
    • Figuratively, sinew; energy: because, a person of dietary fiber.
    • Coarse, indigestible plant matter, consisting mostly of polysaccharides such as cellulose, that after eaten stimulates abdominal peristalsis. Also known as bulk, roughage.
    • A single elongated little bit of certain product, approximately round in cross-section, usually turned with other materials to make thread.
    • Material; stuff; high quality; character.
    • especially In physiology and zoology: A filament; a slender thread-like factor, as of muscular or nervous structure. Most areas and structures associated with human anatomy are composed of packages of fibers. See cut under muscular.
    • A material in the form of fibers.
    • Fibrous structure overall.
    • A material whose length is at the very least 1000 times its width.
    • fiber.
    • very good processes moving through and appearing to rivet together several concentric laminæ of bone-tissue; perforating fibers.
    • A slender, elongated, threadlike item or construction.
    • A slender, elongated, threadlike item or construction.
    • A slender, elongated, threadlike item or construction.
    • the precise title regarding the beaver, Castor dietary fiber.
    • Botany among elongated, thick-walled cells giving power and help to plant muscle.
    • Botany among the elongated, thick-walled cells that give power and support to grow structure.
    • Botany one of several elongated, thick-walled cells that give power and support to plant muscle.
    • [capitalized] A genus of rodents, of the family Muridæ and subfamily Arvicolinæ, of which the type is the muskrat, musquash, or ondatra of North America, Fiber zibethicus, having a long scaly tail, vertically flattened, and large webbed hind feet. See muskrat.
    • Anatomy Any of the filaments constituting the extracellular matrix of connective muscle.
    • Anatomy the filaments constituting the extracellular matrix of connective tissue.
    • Anatomy the filaments constituting the extracellular matrix of connective muscle.
    • Moral strength and resolve.
    • Anatomy any one of various elongated cells or threadlike structures, particularly a muscle fibre or a nerve fiber.
    • Anatomy Any of various elongated cells or threadlike frameworks, specifically a muscle dietary fiber or a nerve fiber.
    • coarse, indigestible plant meals lower in vitamins; its bulk stimulates intestinal peristalsis
    • Anatomy Any of various elongated cells or threadlike frameworks, especially a muscle fibre or a nerve fiber.
    • The preimage of certain point in the product range of a map.
    • a normal or artificial filament, as of cotton or plastic, capable of being spun into yarn.
    • a normal or artificial filament, as of cotton or plastic, capable of becoming spun into yarn.
    • some of a few elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle fiber or a nerve fiber)
    • a type of lightweight thread of execution.
    • information made from such filaments.
    • a leatherlike product made by compressing layers of report or cloth
    • information manufactured from these types of filaments.
    • one of many fragile, threadlike portions of which the areas of flowers and pets are in component constituted.
    • something which provides material or texture.
    • the built-in complex of qualities that determines a person's ethical and ethical activities and responses
    • a thing that provides substance or surface.
    • Any fine, slender thread, or threadlike material; ; especially, the thin rootlets of a plant.
    • Important character: "stirred the much deeper materials of my nature” ( Oscar Wilde).
    • a slender and significantly elongated material effective at becoming spun into yarn
    • Important character: "stirred the deeper fibers of my nature” ( Oscar Wilde).
    • the built-in complex of attributes that determine an individual's moral and honest activities and reactions; sinew; energy; toughness.
    • Basic power or toughness; fortitude: with a lack of moral fibre.
    • Basic strength or toughness; fortitude: without moral fiber.
    • A general title for the natural material, such as cotton, flax, hemp, etc., used in textile manufactures.
    • Coarse, indigestible plant matter, consisting primarily of polysaccharides such as for instance cellulose, that after eaten encourages abdominal peristalsis. Also known as bulk, roughage.
    • Coarse, indigestible plant matter, consisting mostly of polysaccharides such as for example cellulose, that after eaten stimulates intestinal peristalsis. Also known as volume, roughage.
    • that part of meals composed of carbohydrates which are entirely or partly indigestible, such as for instance cellulose or pectin; it could be in an insoluble or a soluble form. It offers bulk to your solid waste and stimulates peristalsis into the intestine. It's discovered especially in grains, fresh fruits, and veggies. There's some medical research which indicates that diets high in dietary fiber lower the risk of colon cancer and lower levels of cholesterol into the blood. It is also called soluble fbre, roughage, or volume.
    • an individual elongated bit of certain product, approximately round in cross-section, frequently twisted with other materials to form thread.
    • one elongated piece of confirmed material, about round in cross-section, usually twisted along with other materials to form thread.
    • a leatherlike product created by compressing levels of paper or fabric.
    • A material in the shape of fibers.
    • A material by means of materials.
    • A thread or filament; any good thread-like section of a substance, as a single natural filament of wool, cotton, silk, or asbestos, the slender terminal roots of a plant, a drawn-out bond of glass, etc.
    • A material whoever size reaches least 1000 times its width.
    • A material whose length is at least 1000 times its width.
    • In a collective good sense, a filamentous compound; a conglomeration of thread-like muscle, particularly exists in creatures and flowers generally; more generally, any animal, veggie, or mineral material the constituent areas of which might be separated into or accustomed form threads for textile materials or perhaps the like: as, muscular or vegetable fiber; the fiber of wool; silk, cotton fiber, or jute fibre; asbestos fibre.
    • soluble fbre.
    • soluble fbre.
    • Figuratively, sinew; strength: since, a man of dietary fiber.
    • Moral power and fix.
    • Moral strength and resolve.
    • information; things; high quality; personality.
    • The preimage of certain part of the range of a map.
    • especially In structure and zoology: A filament; a slender thread-like element, by muscular or nervous structure. Many cells and structures associated with the body are composed of bundles of fibers. See cut-under muscular.
    • some sort of lightweight thread of execution.
    • Fibrous structure in general.
    • the fine, threadlike portions of which the cells of plants and creatures are in part constituted.
    • really fine processes driving through and seeming to rivet collectively a few concentric laminæ of bone-tissue; perforating materials.
    • Any fine, slim thread, or threadlike compound; ; particularly, one of many slim rootlets of a plant.
    • The specific title for the beaver, Castor fiber.
    • the built-in complex of characteristics that determine an individual's ethical and ethical actions and responses; sinew; strength; toughness.
    • [capitalized] A genus of rats, of the household Muridæ and subfamily Arvicolinæ, that the sort is the muskrat, musquash, or ondatra of the united states, Fiber zibethicus, having an extended scaly tail, vertically flattened, and enormous webbed hind legs. See muskrat.
    • a normal or artificial filament, by cotton or plastic, with the capacity of becoming spun into yarn.
    • coarse, indigestible plant meals reduced in nutritional elements; its bulk stimulates intestinal peristalsis
    • information made from such filaments.
    • any one of several elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle fiber or a nerve fibre)
    • something which provides compound or surface.
    • Essential character: "stirred the deeper fibers of my nature” ( Oscar Wilde).
    • a leatherlike product made by compressing layers of paper or fabric
    • fundamental power or toughness; fortitude: with a lack of ethical fibre.
    • Coarse, indigestible plant matter, consisting primarily of polysaccharides such cellulose, that whenever eaten encourages abdominal peristalsis. Also known as bulk, roughage.
    • A single elongated bit of a given product, around round in cross-section, usually turned with other fibers to create thread.
    • A material in the shape of fibers.
    • A material whoever size are at least 1000 times its width.
    • Dietary fiber.
    • Moral energy and resolve.
    • The preimage of certain part of the product range of a map.
    • some sort of lightweight thread of execution.
    • the fragile, threadlike portions that the cells of flowers and pets are in part constituted.
    • Any good, thin bond, or threadlike material; ; specifically, among slim rootlets of a plant.
    • A general title the raw material, such as for instance cotton, flax, hemp, etc., used in textile manufactures.
    • that percentage of food composed of carbohydrates that are completely or partially indigestible, such as for instance cellulose or pectin; it may possibly be in an insoluble or a soluble kind. It gives volume towards solid waste and encourages peristalsis inside intestine. Its discovered especially in grains, fresh fruits, and veggies. There clearly was some medical research which suggests that diet programs high in fibre reduce steadily the risk of colon cancer and lower levels of cholesterol in blood. It's also called dietary fiber, roughage, or bulk.
    • the built-in complex of characteristics that determine someone's ethical and ethical activities and responses; sinew; power; toughness.
    • A general name the raw product, such as for example cotton fiber, flax, hemp, etc., found in textile manufactures.
    • a leatherlike material created by compressing layers of report or fabric.
    • that percentage of food consists of carbohydrates that are completely or partly indigestible, particularly cellulose or pectin; it may be in an insoluble or a soluble kind. It offers volume toward solid waste and stimulates peristalsis within the bowel. Its discovered especially in grains, fresh fruits, and vegetables. There is certainly some health proof which shows that diet programs high in fibre decrease the chance of colon cancer and lower cholesterol levels inside blood. Furthermore called soluble fbre, roughage, or volume.
    • A thread or filament; any good thread-like section of a substance, as an individual all-natural filament of wool, cotton, silk, or asbestos, one of the slim terminal origins of a plant, a drawn-out thread of glass, etc.
    • In a collective good sense, a filamentous material; a conglomeration of thread-like muscle, particularly exists in pets and flowers usually; even more usually, any pet, vegetable, and sometimes even mineral material the constituent components of which can be separated into or regularly develop threads for textile textiles or the like: as, muscular or vegetable fibre; the fibre of wool; silk, cotton, or jute dietary fiber; asbestos fibre.
    • a leatherlike product produced by compressing levels of report or cloth.
    • The preimage of a given part of the number of a map.
    • Figuratively, sinew; power: since, a guy of dietary fiber.
    • A thread or filament; any good thread-like part of a substance, as just one normal filament of wool, cotton fiber, silk, or asbestos, one of several slender terminal roots of a plant, a drawn-out thread of glass, etc.
    • Material; material; quality; personality.
    • In a collective sense, a filamentous material; a conglomeration of thread-like structure, such as for example is out there in pets and flowers usually; more usually, any pet, vegetable, as well as mineral compound the constituent areas of that might be separated into or regularly develop threads for textile fabrics or perhaps the like: as, muscular or vegetable fiber; the fiber of wool; silk, cotton, or jute fiber; asbestos dietary fiber.
    • especially In anatomy and zoology: A filament; a slender thread-like element, by muscular or nervous tissue. Most cells and frameworks of the body are composed of bundles of fibers. See cut under muscular.
    • Figuratively, sinew; energy: since, a guy of fiber.
    • Fibrous structure generally speaking.
    • Material; stuff; high quality; personality.
    • A slender, elongated, threadlike item or framework.
    • very fine procedures moving through and appearing to rivet together a number of concentric laminæ of bone-tissue; perforating fibers.
    • A slender, elongated, threadlike item or framework.
    • the inherent complex of qualities that determines a person's moral and ethical activities and responses
    • a type of lightweight bond of execution.
    • Botany among elongated, thick-walled cells that provide power and help to grow structure.
    • a slender and significantly elongated substance capable of being spun into yarn
    • Botany One of the elongated, thick-walled cells that provide energy and help to grow structure.
    • the precise name associated with the beaver, Castor fiber.
    • Anatomy the filaments constituting the extracellular matrix of connective structure.
    • Anatomy the filaments constituting the extracellular matrix of connective structure.
    • [capitalized] A genus of rodents, regarding the household Muridæ and subfamily Arvicolinæ, that the nature may be the muskrat, musquash, or ondatra of North America, Fiber zibethicus, having a lengthy scaly end, vertically flattened, and large webbed hind feet. See muskrat.
    • Anatomy some of various elongated cells or threadlike structures, particularly a muscle fiber or a nerve dietary fiber.
    • coarse, indigestible plant food lower in nutritional elements; its volume promotes intestinal peristalsis
    • an all-natural or artificial filament, since cotton or plastic, capable of becoming spun into yarn.
    • some of a number of elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle dietary fiber or a nerve fiber)
    • Material made from these types of filaments.
    • a leatherlike material produced by compressing layers of paper or fabric
    • the inherent complex of characteristics that determines an individuals ethical and ethical activities and responses
    • something which provides compound or surface.
    • Crucial character: "stirred the much deeper fibers of my nature” ( Oscar Wilde).
    • a slender and significantly elongated material capable of becoming spun into yarn
    • among delicate, threadlike portions that the cells of flowers and animals have been in component constituted.
    • Specifically In structure and zoology: A filament; a slender thread-like factor, by muscular or nervous tissue. Many cells and frameworks of body consist of packages of materials. See cut-under muscular.
    • Anatomy some of various elongated cells or threadlike frameworks, specifically a muscle dietary fiber or a nerve fiber.
    • an all-natural or synthetic filament, since cotton or plastic, with the capacity of becoming spun into yarn.
    • Any fine, slender thread, or threadlike substance; ; especially, one of the slender rootlets of a plant.
    • Fibrous tissue generally.
    • Material made from these types of filaments.
    • the built-in complex of attributes that determine your ethical and ethical activities and responses; sinew; power; toughness.
    • very fine processes moving through and appearing to rivet together a number of concentric laminæ of bone-tissue; perforating materials.
    • Something that provides material or surface.
    • an over-all name for natural material, such as for instance cotton, flax, hemp, etc., used in textile manufactures.
    • fundamental strength or toughness; fortitude: lacking in moral fiber.
    • the precise title for the beaver, Castor fibre.
    • Essential personality: "stirred the deeper fibers of my nature” ( Oscar Wilde).
    • [capitalized] A genus of rats, for the family members Muridæ and subfamily Arvicolinæ, which the kind could be the muskrat, musquash, or ondatra of the united states, Fiber zibethicus, having a lengthy scaly end, vertically flattened, and enormous webbed hind foot. See muskrat.
    • that portion of food made up of carbohydrates which are totally or partly indigestible, eg cellulose or pectin; it could be in an insoluble or a soluble form. It offers volume to the solid waste and stimulates peristalsis in bowel. It's found particularly in grains, fruits, and vegetables. There is some medical research which shows that diet programs high in fiber lower the danger of a cancerous colon and minimize cholesterol levels in the blood. It is also called soluble fbre, roughage, or volume.
    • Basic power or toughness; fortitude: lacking in moral dietary fiber.
    • Coarse, indigestible plant matter, consisting mostly of polysaccharides such cellulose, whenever consumed stimulates abdominal peristalsis. Also called volume, roughage.
    • coarse, indigestible plant meals reduced in vitamins; its volume stimulates intestinal peristalsis
    • a leatherlike material made by compressing layers of paper or fabric.
    • an individual elongated bit of confirmed material, around round in cross-section, usually twisted with other materials to create bond.
    • any of several elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle dietary fiber or a nerve fibre)
    • Coarse, indigestible plant matter, consisting mostly of polysaccharides eg cellulose, that after consumed promotes intestinal peristalsis. Also called bulk, roughage.
    • just one elongated bit of confirmed material, approximately round in cross-section, frequently twisted with other fibers to make bond.
    • A material by means of fibers.
    • a leatherlike product made by compressing levels of report or fabric
    • A material whoever size has reached the very least 1000 times its width.
    • A material by means of fibers.
    • the built-in complex of qualities that determines a persons ethical and moral activities and reactions
    • Dietary fiber.
    • A material whoever size are at least 1000 times its width.
    • soluble fbre.
    • A thread or filament; any fine thread-like part of a substance, as a single all-natural filament of wool, cotton fiber, silk, or asbestos, among the slim terminal origins of a plant, a drawn-out thread of cup, etc.
    • Moral energy and resolve.
    • a slender and significantly elongated compound effective at being spun into yarn
    • The preimage of a given part of the range of a map.
    • Moral energy and fix.
    • In a collective good sense, a filamentous substance; a conglomeration of thread-like structure, including is out there in animals and flowers generally; even more typically, any pet, veggie, and on occasion even mineral material the constituent elements of which may be sectioned off into or accustomed form threads for textile textiles or the like: as, muscular or vegetable dietary fiber; the dietary fiber of wool; silk, cotton fiber, or jute fibre; asbestos fiber.
    • a type of lightweight bond of execution.
    • The preimage of certain part of the number of a map.
    • Figuratively, sinew; energy: because, a guy of dietary fiber.
    • among the fine, threadlike portions that the cells of plants and creatures have been in component constituted.
    • some sort of lightweight thread of execution.
    • information; material; quality; personality.
    • Any good, thin thread, or threadlike compound; ; specifically, one of several slender rootlets of a plant.
    • One of the fine, threadlike portions which the tissues of flowers and creatures are in component constituted.
    • Specifically In structure and zoology: A filament; a slender thread-like element, at the time of muscular or nervous muscle. Many cells and frameworks of this human body are comprised of bundles of fibers. See cut-under muscular.
    • the built-in complex of attributes that determine a person's ethical and honest actions and reactions; sinew; strength; toughness.
    • Fibrous tissue in general.
    • A general title the raw product, particularly cotton, flax, hemp, etc., utilized in textile manufactures.
    • Any fine, slender thread, or threadlike substance; ; specially, one of several slender rootlets of a plant.
    • the inherent complex of attributes that determine someone's ethical and moral actions and responses; sinew; strength; toughness.
    • that percentage of food consists of carbs which are totally or partially indigestible, such cellulose or pectin; it may possibly be in an insoluble or a soluble form. It gives bulk on solid waste and promotes peristalsis in the bowel. Its found especially in grains, fresh fruits, and vegetables. There is some medical proof which suggests that diets high in fibre reduce steadily the risk of a cancerous colon and minimize cholesterol levels inside blood. Additionally, it is known as soluble fbre, roughage, or bulk.
    • extremely fine processes passing through and seeming to rivet together a few concentric laminæ of bone-tissue; perforating materials.
    • A general name for natural product, such cotton, flax, hemp, etc., found in textile manufactures.
    • a leatherlike material made by compressing levels of paper or cloth.
    • that portion of food made up of carbs that are entirely or partly indigestible, such as cellulose or pectin; it may be in an insoluble or a soluble form. It provides volume towards solid waste and encourages peristalsis in the bowel. Its discovered particularly in grains, fresh fruits, and veggies. There is some medical research which shows that diets saturated in fiber lessen the chance of cancer of the colon and minimize levels of cholesterol in bloodstream. It is also known as soluble fbre, roughage, or bulk.
    • A thread or filament; any good thread-like element of a substance, as an individual natural filament of wool, cotton fiber, silk, or asbestos, among the thin terminal origins of a plant, a drawn-out bond of glass, etc.
    • In a collective good sense, a filamentous substance; a conglomeration of thread-like muscle, particularly is out there in pets and flowers generally; more usually, any animal, vegetable, and on occasion even mineral substance the constituent parts of which can be partioned into or familiar with develop threads for textile materials or perhaps the love: as, muscular or vegetable fiber; the fiber of wool; silk, cotton, or jute dietary fiber; asbestos fibre.
    • a leatherlike material made by compressing layers of paper or fabric.
    • Figuratively, sinew; energy: as, a person of fiber.
    • A thread or filament; any good thread-like section of a substance, as a single normal filament of wool, cotton, silk, or asbestos, among slender terminal roots of a plant, a drawn-out bond of glass, etc.
    • In a collective good sense, a filamentous material; a conglomeration of thread-like tissue, eg is out there in animals and flowers generally speaking; more generally speaking, any animal, vegetable, or mineral material the constituent parts of which may be partioned into or used to form threads for textile fabrics or the love: as, muscular or vegetable fibre; the dietary fiber of wool; silk, cotton fiber, or jute fiber; asbestos fibre.
    • Material; things; high quality; character.
    • Figuratively, sinew; power: as, a man of dietary fiber.
    • Specifically In physiology and zoology: A filament; a slender thread-like element, at the time of muscular or nervous muscle. Most tissues and frameworks associated with human body consist of packages of materials. See cut-under muscular.
    • Material; material; high quality; personality.
    • Fibrous structure generally speaking.
    • particularly In physiology and zoology: A filament; a slender thread-like element, by muscular or stressed structure. Many cells and frameworks for the human body consist of bundles of fibers. See cut under muscular.
    • The specific name associated with beaver, Castor fiber.
    • extremely good processes moving through and appearing to rivet collectively a few concentric laminæ of bone-tissue; perforating materials.
    • [capitalized] A genus of rodents, of household Muridæ and subfamily Arvicolinæ, which the sort is the muskrat, musquash, or ondatra of the united states, Fiber zibethicus, having an extended scaly end, vertically flattened, and enormous webbed hind foot. See muskrat.
    • the precise name of the beaver, Castor dietary fiber.
    • coarse, indigestible plant meals lower in nutrients; its volume encourages intestinal peristalsis
    • [capitalized] A genus of rodents, of family Muridæ and subfamily Arvicolinæ, which the kind could be the muskrat, musquash, or ondatra of North America, Fiber zibethicus, having a lengthy scaly end, vertically flattened, and large webbed hind feet. See muskrat.
    • any of several elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle dietary fiber or a nerve dietary fiber)
    • coarse, indigestible plant food lower in nutritional elements; its volume promotes abdominal peristalsis
    • a leatherlike product made by compressing levels of report or fabric
    • any of a number of elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle fiber or a nerve fiber)
    • the inherent complex of attributes that determines an individuals moral and moral activities and reactions
    • a leatherlike material produced by compressing levels of report or fabric
    • a slender and considerably elongated compound with the capacity of becoming spun into yarn
    • the inherent complex of attributes that determines a persons moral and moral actions and reactions
    • a slender and significantly elongated material effective at being spun into yarn
    • Fibrous tissue as a whole.
    • very fine procedures passing through and appearing to rivet together a few concentric laminæ of bone-tissue; perforating materials.
    • the particular title of the beaver, Castor fiber.
    • [capitalized] A genus of rodents, regarding the household Muridæ and subfamily Arvicolinæ, of which the sort could be the muskrat, musquash, or ondatra of North America, Fiber zibethicus, having a long scaly tail, vertically flattened, and enormous webbed hind legs. See muskrat.
    • coarse, indigestible plant meals reduced in nutrients; its bulk stimulates intestinal peristalsis
    • some of several elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle dietary fiber or a nerve fiber)
    • a leatherlike product made by compressing layers of report or fabric
    • the inherent complex of qualities that determines a persons moral and ethical activities and responses
    • a slender and considerably elongated substance effective at becoming spun into yarn

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