fever definition

  • noun:
    • uncommonly high body's temperature.
    • any one of various conditions described as unusually large body's temperature.
    • unusually large body's temperature.
    • a disorder of increased task or pleasure: a fever of anticipation.
    • some of different conditions described as uncommonly high body temperature.
    • A contagious, typically temporary enthusiasm or craze: disco temperature.
    • A condition of increased task or excitement: a fever of expectation.
    • unusually high body's temperature.
    • A contagious, typically short-lived passion or trend: disco temperature.
    • any one of different conditions described as uncommonly large body temperature.
    • A condition of increased task or excitement: a fever of expectation.
    • an increased than usual body's temperature of someone (or, usually, a mammal), frequently caused by disease.
    • A contagious, usually temporary passion or trend: disco fever.
    • any one of various conditions.
    • A state of pleasure (of someone or people).
    • a greater than usual body's temperature of people (or, generally, a mammal), often due to illness.
    • a team of stingrays.
    • some of various conditions.
    • A higher than normal body temperature of people (or, typically, a mammal), typically brought on by condition.
    • some of numerous conditions.
    • circumstances of pleasure (of a person or individuals).
    • A diseased condition associated with system, marked by increased temperature, speed regarding the pulse, and a general derangement of the features, including usually, thirst and losing desire for food. Numerous conditions, which fever is considered the most prominent symptom, tend to be denominated fevers
    • a situation of pleasure (of an individual or men and women).
    • exorbitant excitement of this passions in result of strong emotion; a disorder of good pleasure.
    • A group of stingrays.
    • In pathol.: A temperature of this human body more than the conventional temperature, showing up as an indication of illness; pyrexia.
    • A diseased state associated with system, marked by increased temperature, speed associated with the pulse, and an over-all derangement for the functions, including typically, thirst and losing desire for food. Numerous conditions, that fever is considered the most prominent symptom, are denominated fevers
    • The band of symptoms comprising pyrexia plus the signs generally of it.
    • Excessive excitement associated with passions in result of powerful feeling; a disorder of good pleasure.
    • an ailment by which pyrexia is a prominent symptom: as, typhoid temperature, scarlet fever, etc.
    • In pathol.: A temperature regarding the body greater than the conventional heat, showing up as an indication of disease; pyrexia.
    • The group of signs comprising pyrexia additionally the symptoms usually related to it.
    • A disease for which pyrexia is a prominent symptom: because, typhoid fever, scarlet fever, etc.
    • temperature; agitation; pleasure by whatever highly impacts the interests: since, a fever of anticipation; a fever of contention.
    • temperature; agitation; excitement by something that strongly affects the passions: since, a fever of suspense; a fever of contention.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • Digestive disturbance with increase of heat and vomiting of bile.
    • Digestive disruption with rise of temperature and vomiting of bile.
    • just like pemphigus.
    • Catarrh of this upper air-passages with fever.
    • Typhoid temperature of a mild kind.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • The pest.
    • Remittent temperature.
    • several stingrays.
    • Acute gastritis.
    • A diseased condition of system, marked by increased heat, acceleration associated with the pulse, and a general derangement for the features, including often, thirst and loss in appetite. Numerous diseases, which temperature is the most prominent symptom, tend to be denominated fevers
    • Relapsing fever.
    • Fever event to some local infection.
    • Excessive pleasure for the interests in result of powerful feeling; a condition of good pleasure.
    • Anthrax.
    • Easy proceeded temperature.
    • In pathol.: A temperature of human anatomy more than the normal heat, appearing as an indication of infection; pyrexia.
    • Cattle-plague.
    • The selection of symptoms comprising pyrexia and signs typically involving it.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • an ailment which pyrexia is a prominent symptom: since, typhoid temperature, scarlet fever, etc.
    • Pyrexia of purely nervous origin.
    • Heat; agitation; pleasure by anything that strongly impacts the passions: since, a fever of anticipation; a fever of assertion.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • digestion disturbance with rise of heat and vomiting of bile.
    • just like pemphigus.
    • Catarrh associated with the top air-passages with temperature.
    • Typhoid fever of a mild form.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • The pest.
    • Remittent fever.
    • Acute gastritis.
    • identical to pemphigus.
    • Catarrh of the top air-passages with fever.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Fever event for some regional inflammation.
    • Typhoid temperature of a mild form.
    • Anthrax.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • The pest.
    • Simple continued temperature.
    • Yellow fever.
    • Cattle-plague.
    • Yellow fever.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • The plague.
    • Pyrexia of strictly stressed source.
    • Typhus fever.
    • Yellow fever.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • Remittent fever.
    • yellow-fever.
    • Ardent carried on temperature.
    • Acute gastritis.
    • The plague.
    • Remittent temperature.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Typhus fever.
    • yellow-fever in new-comers.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Fever event for some regional inflammation.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • Cerebrospinal meningitis.
    • Anthrax.
    • a time period of incubation of a couple of weeks, almost, terminating in prodromata enduring for some times, and consisting in an over-all fatigued sensation and indisposition to effort of any sort, lossof desire for food, often some irregularity, small frustration, and discomforts inside limbs.
    • Ardent continued temperature.
    • Simple proceeded fever.
    • a time period of intrusion of a week or less, characterized by a gradually increasing heat, with morning remissions and night exacerbations, wish of appetite, thirst, dry and coated tongue, frequent pulse, frustration, frequently nose-bleed, often irregularity, often small diarrhea, a little tympanitic stomach, with maybe some tenderness and gurgling in correct iliac region, some development for the spleen, maybe small delirium at night, many bronchitis.
    • Cattle-plague.
    • Remittent temperature.
    • A period of continued pyrexia (temperature) in which the heat ceases to rise, as well as in which its daily variants tend to be less. This era (fastigium) lasts for a week or two. The hope of desire for food, thirst, dried out tongue, frequent pulse, stress, and bronchitis carry on or are increased. The tympanitis, splenic development, and delirium become more obvious. Three to four smooth yellowish feces are passed every day. In regards to the beginning of the period an eruption of tiny, green, somewhat raised places seems on epidermis, specifically for the back and stomach.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • yellow fever in new-comers.
    • Pyrexia of purely nervous beginning.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • Cerebrospinal meningitis.
    • A period of incubation of two weeks, just about, terminating in prodromata enduring for a few times, and consisting in a general exhausted experience and indisposition to exertion of any sort, lossof appetite, generally some irregularity, small annoyance, and discomforts within the limbs.
    • a time period of intrusion of a week or less, characterized by a slowly increasing temperature, with early morning remissions and night exacerbations, wish of appetite, thirst, dry and coated tongue, regular pulse, annoyance, usually nose-bleed, often irregularity, often minor diarrhea, a little tympanitic stomach, with maybe some pain and gurgling within the right iliac region, some enhancement of the spleen, perhaps small delirium at night, and some bronchitis.
    • a time period of continued pyrexia (temperature) in which the heat stops to rise, as well as in which its day-to-day variations are less. This era (fastigium) lasts for a week or two. The aim of appetite, thirst, dried out tongue, frequent pulse, hassle, and bronchitis continue or tend to be increased. The tympanitis, splenic development, and delirium be obvious. 3 or 4 soft yellowish feces are passed daily. In regards to the beginning of the period an eruption of little, pink, a little raised places appears regarding skin, particularly of as well as abdomen.
    • A period of defervescence, in which the temperature slowly disappears and all sorts of signs and symptoms improve. This may last about weekly. Situations vary a lot out of this typical development, and may be marked besides by intestinal hemorrhage, perforation regarding the intestinal wall with collapse and peritonitis, thrombosis for the larger veins, especially the femoral, pneumonia, lobular and (seldom) lobar, or meningitis. Relapses (after a standard heat is reached) and recrudescences (ahead of the temperature has actually entirely disappeared) are not extremely unusual. The mortality differs, nevertheless the average of recent reports is certainly not far from 10 percent. The main anatomical features are infection of Peyer's patches as well as the individual glands associated with the tiny and often regarding the huge bowel, with irritation for the mesenteric lymphatic glands. Persons between fifteen and thirty years appear to be most regularly attacked. A previous attack creates a specific although not complete defense. The contagium seems to be offered removed from the ill mainly by the stools. The contamination of food and drink is apparently the most important mode of ingress. Private contact will not materially boost exposure. Typhoid temperature is currently believed to be brought on by a microscopic parasitic organism or bacillus, in length about 1 / 3rd the diameter of a red blood-corpuscle, in thickness about 1 / 3 of the size, with curved finishes, mobile, forming spores at a temperature between 30° and 42°C., although not at lower temperatures, and developing small brownish-yellow colonies on gelatin, which it will not soften. For synonyms, see expressions above.
    • A smith; an artisan.
    • a growth in temperature of this human anatomy; often a symptom of disease
    • Yellow fever.
    • A period of defervescence, in which the fever gradually disappears and all the symptoms improve. This may last about a week. Cases vary much from this typical progress, and may be marked in addition by intestinal hemorrhage, perforation of the intestinal wall with collapse and peritonitis, thrombosis of the larger veins, especially the femoral, pneumonia, lobular and (rarely) lobar, or meningitis. Relapses (after a normal temperature has been reached) and recrudescences (before the fever has entirely disappeared) are not very uncommon. The mortality varies, but the average of recent reports is not far from 10 per cent. The main anatomical features are inflammation of Peyer's patches and of the solitary glands of the small and sometimes of the large intestine, with inflammation of the mesenteric lymphatic glands. Persons between fifteen and thirty years of age seem to be most frequently attacked. A previous attack produces a certain but not complete protection. The contagium seems to be given off from the sick mainly by the stools. The contamination of food and drink seems to be the most important mode of ingress. Personal contact does not materially increase exposure. Typhoid fever is now believed to be caused by a microscopic parasitic organism or bacillus, in length about one third the diameter of a red blood-corpuscle, in thickness about one third of its length, with rounded ends, mobile, forming spores at a temperature between 30° and 42°C., but not at lower temperatures, and forming minute brownish-yellow colonies on gelatin, which it does not soften. For synonyms, see phrases above.
    • Yellow fever.
    • The plague.
    • Typhus fever.
    • A smith; an artisan.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • intense nervous expectation
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Ardent proceeded fever.
    • Remittent fever.
    • yellow-fever in new-comers.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • Cerebrospinal meningitis.
    • a time period of incubation of a couple of weeks, almost, terminating in prodromata enduring for some times, and consisting in a general tired experience and indisposition to effort of any kind, lossof appetite, usually some constipation, small stress, and pains into the limbs.
    • A period of intrusion of per week or less, characterized by a gradually increasing temperature, with early morning remissions and evening exacerbations, wish of appetite, thirst, dry and coated tongue, regular pulse, inconvenience, often nose-bleed, frequently constipation, frequently slight diarrhea, somewhat tympanitic abdomen, with possibly some tenderness and gurgling in right iliac region, some development associated with the spleen, possibly minor delirium at night, plus some bronchitis.
    • a time period of continued pyrexia (temperature) in which the heat ceases to go up, plus in which its daily variations tend to be less. This era (fastigium) can last for a week or two. The want of desire for food, thirst, dry tongue, frequent pulse, frustration, and bronchitis continue or are increased. The tympanitis, splenic development, and delirium be a little more obvious. 3 or 4 soft yellow evacuations are passed away daily. Towards start of the period an eruption of little, green, slightly raised spots seems regarding the skin, especially of back and stomach.
    • A period of defervescence, where the temperature gradually disappears and all the symptoms improve. This might last about a week. Cases differ much from this typical progress, that can be marked furthermore by abdominal hemorrhage, perforation of the abdominal wall with collapse and peritonitis, thrombosis of larger veins, particularly the femoral, pneumonia, lobular and (seldom) lobar, or meningitis. Relapses (after an ordinary temperature happens to be reached) and recrudescences (prior to the temperature has actually totally disappeared) aren't really unusual. The mortality varies, nevertheless average of recent reports isn't not even close to 10 %. The key anatomical features tend to be inflammation of Peyer's patches and of the solitary glands regarding the little and often of the large intestine, with infection associated with the mesenteric lymphatic glands. People between fifteen and thirty years old seem to be most frequently attacked. A previous assault produces a specific yet not total security. The contagium appears to be given faraway from the ill mainly by the feces. The contamination of refreshments appears to be the most crucial mode of ingress. Individual contact cannot materially increase exposure. Typhoid temperature is now thought to be due to a microscopic parasitic organism or bacillus, long about 1 / 3 the diameter of a red blood-corpuscle, in thickness about 1 / 3rd of their length, with rounded ends, mobile, forming spores at a temperature between 30° and 42°C., although not at lower temperatures, and forming small brownish-yellow colonies on gelatin, which it will not soften. For synonyms, see expressions above.
    • a growth inside heat for the human body; regularly an indicator of illness
    • intense stressed anticipation
    • A smith; an artisan.
    • a growth in heat of the human anatomy; regularly a symptom of disease
    • intense nervous expectation
    • Abnormally large body's temperature.
    • Abnormally large body's temperature.
    • Any of different diseases characterized by abnormally large body's temperature.
    • uncommonly large body's temperature.
    • unusually high body temperature.
    • a disorder of heightened activity or pleasure: a fever of expectation.
    • any one of numerous diseases characterized by unusually high body temperature.
    • Any of different diseases characterized by abnormally high body's temperature.
    • any one of various diseases characterized by unusually high body temperature.
    • a contagious, generally short-lived enthusiasm or craze: disco temperature.
    • a disorder of heightened activity or excitement: a fever of anticipation.
    • A condition of heightened task or excitement: a fever of expectation.
    • a disorder of increased activity or excitement: a fever of expectation.
    • A contagious, often short-lived enthusiasm or craze: disco temperature.
    • A contagious, usually temporary enthusiasm or craze: disco temperature.
    • a greater than normal body temperature of you (or, generally, a mammal), frequently due to disease.
    • a greater than usual body temperature of people (or, generally, a mammal), frequently due to illness.
    • an increased than normal body's temperature of people (or, typically, a mammal), usually caused by infection.
    • any one of numerous conditions.
    • some of various conditions.
    • circumstances of pleasure (of someone or individuals).
    • circumstances of excitement (of an individual or folks).
    • A group of stingrays.
    • a small grouping of stingrays.
    • A contagious, usually short-lived enthusiasm or craze: disco fever.
    • Any of different conditions.
    • A diseased condition associated with system, marked by increased heat, acceleration of pulse, and a general derangement associated with the functions, including often, thirst and loss of desire for food. Numerous conditions, of which fever is one of prominent symptom, tend to be denominated fevers
    • Excessive pleasure regarding the interests in consequence of strong feeling; an ailment of great pleasure.
    • a greater than normal body temperature of an individual (or, usually, a mammal), generally brought on by disease.
    • any one of numerous conditions.
    • a situation of pleasure (of someone or men and women).
    • In pathol.: A temperature for the human anatomy greater than the standard temperature, showing up as an indicator of condition; pyrexia.
    • a situation of pleasure (of an individual or men and women).
    • A diseased state regarding the system, marked by increased temperature, speed for the pulse, and an over-all derangement for the features, including usually, thirst and reduced desire for food. Many diseases, that fever is considered the most prominent symptom, tend to be denominated fevers
    • The set of signs composed of pyrexia together with symptoms frequently of it.
    • A group of stingrays.
    • a small grouping of stingrays.
    • Excessive excitement of the interests in result of strong feeling; an ailment of good excitement.
    • A diseased condition of this system, marked by increased heat, acceleration regarding the pulse, and a broad derangement for the features, including usually, thirst and loss of appetite. Many diseases, of which temperature is the most prominent symptom, are denominated fevers
    • In pathol.: A temperature of this human anatomy more than the standard heat, showing up as an indication of illness; pyrexia.
    • A diseased condition for the system, marked by increased temperature, acceleration for the pulse, and a broad derangement of functions, including usually, thirst and loss in appetite. Many conditions, which fever is the most prominent symptom, are denominated fevers
    • The band of signs consisting of pyrexia additionally the symptoms typically of it.
    • extortionate pleasure of the passions in consequence of powerful emotion; a condition of great excitement.
    • extortionate excitement of the passions in consequence of strong feeling; a disorder of good pleasure.
    • an ailment in which pyrexia is a prominent symptom: as, typhoid temperature, scarlet fever, etc.
    • an illness where pyrexia is a prominent symptom: since, typhoid fever, scarlet temperature, etc.
    • temperature; agitation; pleasure by anything that strongly impacts the passions: since, a fever of suspense; a fever of contention.
    • temperature; agitation; excitement by anything that highly impacts the interests: since, a fever of suspense; a fever of contention.
    • In pathol.: A temperature associated with human anatomy higher than the conventional temperature, showing up as an indication of condition; pyrexia.
    • In pathol.: A temperature of the human anatomy more than the conventional temperature, showing up as a symptom of condition; pyrexia.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • The selection of symptoms consisting of pyrexia and also the symptoms frequently connected with it.
    • The number of symptoms consisting of pyrexia therefore the symptoms frequently associated with it.
    • digestion disturbance with rise of temperature and nausea of bile.
    • an ailment which pyrexia is a prominent symptom: since, typhoid fever, scarlet fever, etc.
    • an ailment by which pyrexia is a prominent symptom: because, typhoid temperature, scarlet fever, etc.
    • Heat; agitation; pleasure by anything that strongly affects the passions: since, a fever of suspense; a fever of assertion.
    • Heat; agitation; pleasure by something that strongly impacts the interests: as, a fever of anticipation; a fever of contention.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Digestive disruption with rise of temperature and sickness of bile.
    • Digestive disturbance with rise of temperature and vomiting of bile.
    • Same as pemphigus.
    • just like pemphigus.
    • Catarrh of this upper air-passages with fever.
    • Catarrh associated with top air-passages with fever.
    • Typhoid fever of a mild kind.
    • Typhoid temperature of a mild kind.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • The pest.
    • The pest.
    • Remittent fever.
    • just like pemphigus.
    • Remittent fever.
    • Acute gastritis.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Catarrh associated with upper air-passages with fever.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • Acute gastritis.
    • Digestive disruption with rise of heat and vomiting of bile.
    • Typhoid temperature of a mild kind.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Fever event to some neighborhood inflammation.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • Fever incident to some neighborhood irritation.
    • The pest.
    • Anthrax.
    • Remittent fever.
    • Easy continued temperature.
    • Acute gastritis.
    • Cattle-plague.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Anthrax.
    • Fever event for some regional swelling.
    • Easy proceeded fever.
    • Anthrax.
    • Cattle-plague.
    • Easy proceeded fever.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Cattle-plague.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Pyrexia of solely nervous origin.
    • Yellow fever.
    • just like pemphigus.
    • yellow-fever.
    • Catarrh associated with the upper air-passages with temperature.
    • The plague.
    • Typhoid temperature of a mild form.
    • Typhus temperature.
    • Pyrexia of purely nervous origin.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Yellow fever.
    • The pest.
    • Pyrexia of strictly stressed beginning.
    • Yellow fever.
    • yellow-fever.
    • Remittent temperature.
    • The plague.
    • Typhoid fever.
    • Acute gastritis.
    • Yellow fever.
    • Typhus temperature.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • The plague.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • Ardent proceeded temperature.
    • Typhus fever.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • Remittent temperature.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • Ardent proceeded fever.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Remittent fever.
    • Ardent proceeded temperature.
    • yellow-fever in new-comers.
    • Remittent fever.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • yellow-fever in new-comers.
    • Cerebrospinal meningitis.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Cerebrospinal meningitis.
    • A period of incubation of fourteen days, pretty much, terminating in prodromata enduring for some times, and consisting in a broad exhausted experience and indisposition to exertion of any sort, lossof desire for food, typically some irregularity, small annoyance, and problems when you look at the limbs.
    • A period of intrusion of weekly or less, characterized by a gradually increasing heat, with morning remissions and night exacerbations, wish of appetite, thirst, dry and covered tongue, regular pulse, stress, usually nose-bleed, generally constipation, usually slight diarrhoea, somewhat tympanitic stomach, with possibly some tenderness and gurgling inside right iliac region, some enhancement for the spleen, maybe minor delirium through the night, many bronchitis.
    • a time period of continued pyrexia (temperature) when the temperature ceases to increase, as well as in which its everyday variations tend to be less. This era (fastigium) can last for weekly or two. The choose of desire for food, thirst, dried out tongue, frequent pulse, stress, and bronchitis carry on or tend to be increased. The tympanitis, splenic development, and delirium become more obvious. Three to four soft yellowish feces are passed daily. In regards to the beginning of this duration an eruption of tiny, green, slightly raised places seems on epidermis, specially associated with as well as stomach.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • yellow fever in new-comers.
    • a time period of defervescence, where the temperature gradually disappears and all sorts of the outward symptoms develop. This could endure about weekly. Cases vary a great deal from this typical development, that will be marked additionally by abdominal hemorrhage, perforation for the intestinal wall with failure and peritonitis, thrombosis of the bigger veins, especially the femoral, pneumonia, lobular and (seldom) lobar, or meningitis. Relapses (after a standard temperature is reached) and recrudescences (ahead of the temperature has actually entirely disappeared) are not very uncommon. The death varies, nevertheless the average of recent reports is not definately not 10 percent. The primary anatomical features tend to be inflammation of Peyer's spots as well as the solitary glands associated with little and often of big bowel, with swelling of the mesenteric lymphatic glands. Persons between fifteen and thirty years old appear to be most often attacked. A previous attack produces a particular however full security. The contagium seems to be provided faraway from the ill mainly by the feces. The contamination of refreshments is apparently the main mode of ingress. Personal contact cannot materially boost publicity. Typhoid temperature is now believed to be caused by a microscopic parasitic system or bacillus, long about 1 / 3rd the diameter of a red blood-corpuscle, in thickness about 1 / 3rd of the size, with curved finishes, cellular, forming spores at a temperature between 30° and 42°C., although not at lower temperatures, and developing minute brownish-yellow colonies on gelatin, which it does not soften. For synonyms, see phrases above.
    • Fever event to some regional infection.
    • A period of incubation of two weeks, just about, terminating in prodromata lasting for a couple days, and consisting in a general fatigued sensation and indisposition to exertion of any sort, lossof appetite, usually some constipation, small stress, and problems within the limbs.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • A period of intrusion of weekly or less, described as a gradually increasing temperature, with morning remissions and night exacerbations, wish of appetite, thirst, dried out and covered tongue, regular pulse, stress, frequently nose-bleed, frequently constipation, frequently slight diarrhoea, somewhat tympanitic stomach, with maybe some pain and gurgling inside right iliac area, some enhancement regarding the spleen, possibly small delirium through the night, many bronchitis.
    • Anthrax.
    • Cerebrospinal meningitis.
    • Easy proceeded temperature.
    • a time period of continued pyrexia (fever) when the heat ceases to rise, as well as in which its everyday variations are less. This period (fastigium) lasts for a week or two. The wish of desire for food, thirst, dried out tongue, frequent pulse, inconvenience, and bronchitis carry on or tend to be increased. The tympanitis, splenic enlargement, and delirium are more pronounced. Three to four soft yellowish feces are passed away each day. In regards to the beginning of the duration an eruption of small, red, a little raised places seems on the skin, particularly of back and stomach.
    • A period of incubation of two weeks, pretty much, terminating in prodromata enduring for a couple days, and consisting in a general exhausted sensation and indisposition to effort of any sort, lossof appetite, often some irregularity, slight inconvenience, and aches when you look at the limbs.
    • A smith; an artisan.
    • Cattle-plague.
    • A period of defervescence, in which the fever gradually disappears and all the symptoms improve. This may last about a week. Cases vary much from this typical progress, and may be marked in addition by intestinal hemorrhage, perforation of the intestinal wall with collapse and peritonitis, thrombosis of the larger veins, especially the femoral, pneumonia, lobular and (rarely) lobar, or meningitis. Relapses (after a normal temperature has been reached) and recrudescences (before the fever has entirely disappeared) are not very uncommon. The mortality varies, but the average of recent reports is not far from 10 per cent. The main anatomical features are inflammation of Peyer's patches and of the solitary glands of the small and sometimes of the large intestine, with inflammation of the mesenteric lymphatic glands. Persons between fifteen and thirty years of age seem to be most frequently attacked. A previous attack produces a certain but not complete protection. The contagium seems to be given off from the sick mainly by the stools. The contamination of food and drink seems to be the most important mode of ingress. Personal contact does not materially increase exposure. Typhoid fever is now believed to be caused by a microscopic parasitic organism or bacillus, in length about one third the diameter of a red blood-corpuscle, in thickness about one third of its length, with rounded ends, mobile, forming spores at a temperature between 30° and 42°C., but not at lower temperatures, and forming minute brownish-yellow colonies on gelatin, which it does not soften. For synonyms, see phrases above.
    • A period of invasion of per week or less, described as a gradually increasing temperature, with morning remissions and night exacerbations, wish of appetite, thirst, dry and coated tongue, regular pulse, inconvenience, frequently nose-bleed, generally irregularity, frequently slight diarrhoea, slightly tympanitic stomach, with maybe some tenderness and gurgling within the correct iliac region, some enlargement of the spleen, possibly slight delirium through the night, and some bronchitis.
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • a rise in the heat associated with the human body; usually an indicator of infection
    • intense nervous expectation
    • a time period of continued pyrexia (fever) in which the heat ceases to rise, and in which its everyday variants are less. This era (fastigium) can last for weekly or two. The want of appetite, thirst, dried out tongue, regular pulse, stress, and bronchitis continue or are increased. The tympanitis, splenic growth, and delirium be pronounced. Three to four soft yellow evacuations are passed every day. About the beginning with this duration an eruption of small, pink, a little raised places appears from the epidermis, specially of the back and stomach.
    • Pyrexia of strictly nervous origin.
    • yellow-fever.
    • A period of defervescence, where fever slowly vanishes and all signs and symptoms develop. This might last about weekly. Instances differ a great deal with this typical progress, that can be marked furthermore by intestinal hemorrhage, perforation of the abdominal wall with failure and peritonitis, thrombosis of larger veins, especially the femoral, pneumonia, lobular and (rarely) lobar, or meningitis. Relapses (after an ordinary temperature is achieved) and recrudescences (before the fever has entirely disappeared) aren't really unusual. The death differs, but the average of recent reports just isn't definately not 10 percent. The main anatomical functions tend to be infection of Peyer's spots as well as the individual glands associated with the small and sometimes of the huge intestine, with irritation associated with the mesenteric lymphatic glands. Persons between fifteen and thirty years appear to be most often assaulted. A previous assault produces a particular however complete defense. The contagium seems to be offered removed from the sick mainly because of the feces. The contamination of refreshments seems to be the most important mode of ingress. Individual contact doesn't materially boost publicity. Typhoid temperature is thought to be brought on by a microscopic parasitic system or bacillus, in length about one-third the diameter of a red blood-corpuscle, thick about one third of its size, with rounded finishes, mobile, forming spores at a temperature between 30° and 42°C., but not at reduced temperatures, and forming small brownish-yellow colonies on gelatin, which it generally does not soften. For synonyms, see phrases above.
    • A smith; an artisan.
    • Yellow fever.
    • The plague.
    • a rise in temperature of body; often a symptom of disease
    • intense stressed anticipation
    • Typhus fever.
    • A smith; an artisan.
    • a growth within the heat of this human anatomy; usually an indicator of illness
    • intense nervous anticipation
    • Typhoid temperature.
    • Relapsing temperature.
    • Ardent carried on temperature.
    • Remittent fever.
    • yellow fever in new-comers.
    • Relapsing fever.
    • Cerebrospinal meningitis.
    • a time period of incubation of two weeks, more or less, terminating in prodromata enduring for a few times, and consisting in a broad exhausted experience and indisposition to effort of any sort, lossof appetite, often some constipation, minor annoyance, and discomforts in the limbs.
    • a time period of intrusion of a week or less, described as a gradually increasing temperature, with morning remissions and night exacerbations, desire of desire for food, thirst, dried out and covered tongue, frequent pulse, stress, usually nose-bleed, frequently constipation, frequently small diarrhoea, somewhat tympanitic stomach, with maybe some tenderness and gurgling in the correct iliac region, some enhancement regarding the spleen, possibly slight delirium at night, and some bronchitis.
    • A period of continued pyrexia (temperature) when the temperature stops to increase, as well as in which its daily variants are less. This period (fastigium) can last for weekly or two. The aim of desire for food, thirst, dry tongue, regular pulse, headache, and bronchitis carry on or tend to be increased. The tympanitis, splenic growth, and delirium be pronounced. 3 or 4 smooth yellowish feces are passed each day. Concerning the start with this duration an eruption of tiny, green, somewhat raised spots seems from the epidermis, especially associated with as well as stomach.
    • A period of defervescence, where the temperature gradually disappears and all the outward symptoms develop. This could endure about per week. Situations vary much using this typical development, that can be marked additionally by abdominal hemorrhage, perforation of intestinal wall with failure and peritonitis, thrombosis of the larger veins, especially the femoral, pneumonia, lobular and (hardly ever) lobar, or meningitis. Relapses (after an ordinary heat is achieved) and recrudescences (prior to the temperature has actually totally disappeared) aren't very unusual. The mortality differs, nevertheless average of recent reports is not not even close to 10 %. The key anatomical features tend to be infection of Peyer's patches and of the solitary glands regarding the little and often of the huge intestine, with inflammation of the mesenteric lymphatic glands. People between fifteen and thirty years of age be seemingly most frequently attacked. A previous attack produces a particular however full defense. The contagium seems to be given off from the unwell mainly by the stools. The contamination of refreshments seems to be the most crucial mode of ingress. Personal contact doesn't materially boost visibility. Typhoid fever is currently thought to be caused by a microscopic parasitic organism or bacillus, long about one third the diameter of a red blood-corpuscle, thick about 1 / 3rd of its length, with curved ends, mobile, creating spores at a temperature between 30° and 42°C., not at reduced conditions, and developing minute brownish-yellow colonies on gelatin, which it does not soften. For synonyms, see phrases above.
    • A smith; an artisan.
    • a rise in the temperature of the human body; frequently an indication of illness
    • intense stressed expectation
  • verb-transitive:
    • To impact temperature in.
    • To impact temperature in.
    • To effect fever in.
    • To put into a fever; to influence with temperature.
    • To put into a fever; to impact with fever.
    • to place into a fever; to impact with fever.
    • To effect fever in.
    • To impact fever in.
    • To effect fever in.
    • To effect fever in.
    • To put into a fever; to affect with fever.
    • to place into a fever; to affect with temperature.
    • to place into a fever; to affect with temperature.
    • to place into a fever; to impact with fever.
  • verb-intransitive:
    • is or become feverish.
    • To be or be feverish.
    • become or come to be feverish.
    • become or become feverish.
    • To be or be feverish.
    • to-be or come to be feverish.
    • to-be or come to be feverish.
  • verb:
    • To put into a fever; to affect with fever.
    • to place into a fever; to influence with fever.
    • To put into a fever; to affect with fever.
    • to place into a fever; to affect with temperature.
    • To put into a fever; to influence with fever.
    • to place into a fever; to impact with temperature.
    • to place into a fever; to impact with fever.
  • others:
    • To put in a fever; infect with fever.
    • To contract or develop fever.
    • To put in a fever; infect with fever.
    • To contract or develop temperature.
    • To put in a fever; infect with temperature.
    • To contract or develop fever.
    • To put in a fever; infect with temperature.
    • To contract or develop temperature.
    • to include a fever; infect with temperature.
    • To contract or develop fever.
    • to set up a fever; infect with fever.
    • To contract or develop temperature.
    • To put in a fever; infect with fever.
    • To contract or develop fever.

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