festival of lights definition

  • others:
    • See Hanukah.
    • Rosh hodesh, the initial (day) of the Jewish lunar month (Num. x. 10).
    • Pesah, the Passover, also referred to as Chan ha-mazoth, the Feast of Unleavened Bread (see matsoth).
    • Shabuoth, or Chaff ha-Shabuoth, the Feast of Weeks, also referred to as Yom ha-bikurim, or day's the First-fruit (Num. xxviii. 26).
    • Sukkoth, meaning ‘booths,’ or ‘tabernacles,’ also called Chaff ha-‘Asiph (Ex. xxiii. 15, 16), the Feast of Ingathering (see Feast of Tabernacles).
    • Yom Teruah (Num. xxix. 1), the ‘day of blowing the trumpet,’ now known as Rosh ha-shanah or first of the Jewish year, when the shofar (ram's horn) can be used.
    • Yom ha-kippurim, the Day of Atonement, which can be not properly a-day of feasting, but the many solemn fast-day in the year. The post-Biblical Jewish authorities have included an extra day to the main festivals; thus the Feast of the Passover has eight rather than seven days; the Feast of Weeks has two instead of one; the Feast of Tabernacles has actually (including Shemini ‘Atsereth and Simhath Torah) nine instead of eight; and Rosh ha-shanah has actually two instead of one. There are several minor festivals and breaks inside Jewish diary, but these, with the exception of Hanukah (which see), as well as the above-named additional days, tend to be disregarded by many reformed congregations.
    • See Hanukah.
    • Rosh hodesh, 1st (time) of this Jewish lunar thirty days (Num. x. 10).
    • Pesah, the Passover, also referred to as Chan ha-mazoth, the Feast of Unleavened loaves of bread (see matsoth).
    • Shabuoth, or Chaff ha-Shabuoth, the Feast of Weeks, also known as Yom ha-bikurim, or Day of the First-fruit (Num. xxviii. 26).
    • Sukkoth, meaning ‘booths,’ or ‘tabernacles,’ also known as Chaff ha-‘Asiph (Ex. xxiii. 15, 16), the Feast of Ingathering (see Feast of Tabernacles).
    • Yom Teruah (Num. xxix. 1), the ‘day of blowing the trumpet,’ now known as Rosh ha-shanah or first of the Jewish year, when the shofar (ram's horn) is used.
    • Yom ha-kippurim, a single day of Atonement, which can be not correctly every single day of feasting, nevertheless many solemn fast-day in the year. The post-Biblical Jewish authorities have included a supplementary day to your principal celebrations; therefore the Feast regarding the Passover has eight in the place of seven days; the Feast of Weeks has two instead of one; the Feast of Tabernacles has actually (including Shemini ‘Atsereth and Simhath Torah) nine as opposed to eight; and Rosh ha-shanah has two as opposed to one. There are numerous small celebrations and holiday breaks within the Jewish calendar, but these, apart from Hanukah (which see), along with the above-named additional times, are disregarded by many reformed congregations.
    • See Hanukah.
    • Rosh hodesh, the first (time) of the Jewish lunar month (Num. x. 10).
    • Pesah, the Passover, also known as Chan ha-mazoth, the Feast of Unleavened Bread (see matsoth).
    • Shabuoth, or Chaff ha-Shabuoth, the Feast of Weeks, also called Yom ha-bikurim, or Day of the First-fruit (Num. xxviii. 26).
    • Sukkoth, indicating ‘booths,’ or ‘tabernacles,’ also called Chaff ha-‘Asiph (Ex. xxiii. 15, 16), the Feast of Ingathering (see Feast of Tabernacles).
    • Yom Teruah (Num. xxix. 1), the ‘day of blowing the trumpet,’ now known as Rosh ha-shanah or first of the Jewish year, when the shofar (ram's horn) is used.
    • Yom ha-kippurim, the Day of Atonement, which is not properly a day of feasting, but the most solemn fast-day in the year. The post-Biblical Jewish authorities have added an extra day to the principal festivals; thus the Feast of the Passover has now eight instead of seven days; the Feast of Weeks has two instead of one; the Feast of Tabernacles has (including Shemini ‘Atsereth and Simhath Torah) nine instead of eight; and Rosh ha-shanah has two instead of one. There are several minor festivals and holidays in the Jewish calendar, but these, with the exception of Hanukah (which see), as well as the above-named additional days, are disregarded by many reformed congregations.
    • See Hanukah.
    • See Hanukah.
    • Rosh hodesh, the very first (time) associated with the Jewish lunar thirty days (Num. x. 10).
    • See Hanukah.
    • Rosh hodesh, the initial (time) of this Jewish lunar month (Num. x. 10).
    • Rosh hodesh, the first (time) of the Jewish lunar month (Num. x. 10).
    • Pesah, the Passover, also known as Chan ha-mazoth, the Feast of Unleavened Bread (see matsoth).
    • Pesah, the Passover, also referred to as Chan ha-mazoth, the Feast of Unleavened loaves of bread (see matsoth).
    • Shabuoth, or Chaff ha-Shabuoth, the Feast of Weeks, also known as Yom ha-bikurim, or day's the First-fruit (Num. xxviii. 26).
    • Pesah, the Passover, also known as Chan ha-mazoth, the Feast of Unleavened loaves of bread (see matsoth).
    • Shabuoth, or Chaff ha-Shabuoth, the Feast of Weeks, also referred to as Yom ha-bikurim, or Day of the First-fruit (Num. xxviii. 26).
    • Sukkoth, meaning ‘booths,’ or ‘tabernacles,’ also referred to as Chaff ha-‘Asiph (Ex. xxiii. 15, 16), the Feast of Ingathering (see Feast of Tabernacles).
    • Shabuoth, or Chaff ha-Shabuoth, the Feast of Weeks, also called Yom ha-bikurim, or day's the First-fruit (Num. xxviii. 26).
    • Sukkoth, meaning ‘booths,’ or ‘tabernacles,’ also referred to as Chaff ha-‘Asiph (Ex. xxiii. 15, 16), the Feast of Ingathering (see Feast of Tabernacles).
    • Sukkoth, meaning ‘booths,’ or ‘tabernacles,’ also called Chaff ha-‘Asiph (Ex. xxiii. 15, 16), the Feast of Ingathering (see Feast of Tabernacles).
    • Yom Teruah (Num. xxix. 1), the ‘day of blowing the trumpet,’ now known as Rosh ha-shanah or firstly the Jewish 12 months, when the shofar (ram's horn) can be used.
    • Yom Teruah (Num. xxix. 1), the ‘day of blowing the trumpet,’ now-known as Rosh ha-shanah or to begin the Jewish 12 months, as soon as the shofar (ram's-horn) is employed.
    • Yom Teruah (Num. xxix. 1), the ‘day of blowing the trumpet,’ now-known as Rosh ha-shanah or to begin the Jewish year, as soon as the shofar (ram's horn) is employed.
    • Yom ha-kippurim, the afternoon of Atonement, which will be maybe not properly each day of feasting, nevertheless the many solemn fast-day in the year. The post-Biblical Jewish authorities have included an additional time to the principal festivals; thus the Feast regarding the Passover has eight as opposed to seven days; the Feast of Weeks has actually two in place of one; the Feast of Tabernacles features (including Shemini ‘Atsereth and Simhath Torah) nine in the place of eight; and Rosh ha-shanah has actually two rather than one. There are many minor festivals and breaks when you look at the Jewish schedule, however these, apart from Hanukah (which see), along with the above-named extra days, are disregarded by many people reformed congregations.
    • Yom ha-kippurim, the Day of Atonement, which is not properly a day of feasting, but the most solemn fast-day in the year. The post-Biblical Jewish authorities have added an extra day to the principal festivals; thus the Feast of the Passover has now eight instead of seven days; the Feast of Weeks has two instead of one; the Feast of Tabernacles has (including Shemini ‘Atsereth and Simhath Torah) nine instead of eight; and Rosh ha-shanah has two instead of one. There are several minor festivals and holidays in the Jewish calendar, but these, with the exception of Hanukah (which see), as well as the above-named additional days, are disregarded by many reformed congregations.
    • Yom ha-kippurim, your day of Atonement, that is maybe not precisely each and every day of feasting, but the many solemn fast-day around. The post-Biblical Jewish authorities have actually included a supplementary day toward major celebrations; hence the Feast associated with the Passover has eight in the place of seven days; the Feast of Weeks has actually two as opposed to one; the Feast of Tabernacles features (including Shemini ‘Atsereth and Simhath Torah) nine as opposed to eight; and Rosh ha-shanah has actually two in place of one. There are numerous minor celebrations and vacations within the Jewish schedule, however these, except for Hanukah (which see), along with the above-named extra times, tend to be disregarded by many reformed congregations.
    • See Hanukah.
    • Rosh hodesh, the very first (time) associated with Jewish lunar thirty days (Num. x. 10).
    • Pesah, the Passover, also referred to as Chan ha-mazoth, the Feast of Unleavened breads (see matsoth).
    • Shabuoth, or Chaff ha-Shabuoth, the Feast of Weeks, also referred to as Yom ha-bikurim, or day's the First-fruit (Num. xxviii. 26).
    • Sukkoth, indicating ‘booths,’ or ‘tabernacles,’ also called Chaff ha-‘Asiph (Ex. xxiii. 15, 16), the Feast of Ingathering (see Feast of Tabernacles).
    • Yom Teruah (Num. xxix. 1), the ‘day of blowing the trumpet,’ now-known as Rosh ha-shanah or firstly the Jewish 12 months, once the shofar (ram's horn) is employed.
    • Yom ha-kippurim, the Day of Atonement, which is not properly a day of feasting, but the most solemn fast-day in the year. The post-Biblical Jewish authorities have added an extra day to the principal festivals; thus the Feast of the Passover has now eight instead of seven days; the Feast of Weeks has two instead of one; the Feast of Tabernacles has (including Shemini ‘Atsereth and Simhath Torah) nine instead of eight; and Rosh ha-shanah has two instead of one. There are several minor festivals and holidays in the Jewish calendar, but these, with the exception of Hanukah (which see), as well as the above-named additional days, are disregarded by many reformed congregations.
  • noun:
    • (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish vacation commemorating the rededication associated with the Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC
    • (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish vacation commemorating the rededication for the Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC
    • (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish holiday commemorating the rededication of Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC
    • (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish getaway commemorating the rededication associated with Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC
    • (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish getaway commemorating the rededication associated with Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC
    • (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish vacation commemorating the rededication associated with Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC
    • (Judaism) an eight-day Jewish vacation commemorating the rededication of the Temple of Jerusalem in 165 BC

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