fate definition

  • noun:
    • The expected power, principle, or power that predetermines occasions.
    • The inevitable activities predestined by this power.
    • your final outcome or outcome; an outcome.
    • Unfavorable fate; doom.
    • Greek & Roman Mythology The three goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, who control human destiny. Used in combination with the.
    • the main cause, force, concept, or divine might that predetermines events.
    • The effect, outcome, outcome, or inevitable occasions predetermined by this cause.
    • Destiny (maybe connotes demise, ruin, misfortune, etc.).
    • the 3 goddesses (The Fates) of classic European mythology that are said to manage the fate of human beings.
    • The expected power, concept, or power that predetermines activities.
    • The unavoidable occasions predestined by this force.
    • A final result or effect; an outcome.
    • bad fate; doom.
    • Greek & Roman Mythology the 3 goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, who control human being destiny. Used with the.
    • the reason, power, principle, or divine will that predetermines events.
    • the consequence, consequence, result, or unavoidable events predetermined by this cause.
    • Destiny (possibly connotes demise, ruin, misfortune, etc.).
    • the 3 goddesses (The Fates) of classic European mythology that are believed to get a handle on the fate of human beings.
    • A fixed decree through which your order of things is recommended; the immutable law for the world; inescapable prerequisite; the power in which all existence is determined and conditioned.
    • A fixed decree where your order of things is prescribed; the immutable law associated with universe; inescapable necessity; the force wherein all existence is decided and trained.
    • Appointed lot; allocated life; arranged or predetermined occasion; destiny; specifically, the last lot; doom; damage; death.
    • Appointed lot; allotted life; arranged or predetermined event; destiny; especially, the final lot; doom; ruin; death.
    • The section of possibility into the matters of life; the unexpected and unestimated conitions regarded as a force shaping occasions; fortune; esp., opposing conditions against which it is ineffective to fight.
    • The element of chance in affairs of life; the unforeseen and unestimated conitions considered as a force shaping activities; fortune; esp., opposing conditions against which its useless to struggle.
    • The three goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, occasionally called the Destinies, or Parcæwho were expected to figure out the course of individual life. These are typically represented, one as keeping the distaff, a second as rotating, and also the 3rd as cutting off the bond.
    • Primarily, a prophetic declaration of just what must certanly be; a divine decree or a set phrase where the order of things is prescribed; thus, that which is inevitably predetermined; destiny ordained and unalterable; that which needs to be, notwithstanding all opposing causes. See fatality.
    • what comes from prerequisite or even the force of conditions; an inevitable course or occasion; therefore, lot of money, lot, or destiny in general: as, it was his fate is betrayed by their celebration.
    • Final occasion; demise; destruction.
    • a factor in death and destruction.
    • [capitalized] [L. Fatum, usually in pl. Fata; Gr. Μοῖρα, pl. Μοῖραι.] In Greek and Roman mythology, destiny: often in the plural, the Destinies, goddesses likely to preside within the delivery, life, and death of humans. They certainly were three in quantity, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. Also Known As, in Latin, Parcæ.
    • Synonyms 1 and 2. Doom, etc. See fate.
    • the greatest agency regarded as predetermining the program of events (usually personified as a woman)
    • your overall situations or symptom in life (including whatever happens for your requirements)
    • an event (or a program of occasions) that will undoubtedly happen in the foreseeable future
    • the 3 goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, often called the Destinies, or Parcæwho had been likely to figure out this course of human life. They have been represented, one as holding the distaff, another as rotating, together with third as cutting off the thread.
    • mostly, a prophetic statement of just what must be; a divine decree or a fixed phrase where the order of things is recommended; thus, what is undoubtedly predetermined; destiny ordained and unalterable; what needs to be, notwithstanding all opposing causes. See fatality.
    • whatever originates from prerequisite or the power of circumstances; an inevitable training course or occasion; for this reason, lot of money, great deal, or future in general: because, it had been his fate become betrayed by their party.
    • Final occasion; death; destruction.
    • a factor in demise and destruction.
    • [capitalized] [L. Fatum, usually in pl. Fata; Gr. Μοῖρα, pl. Μοῖραι.] In Greek and Roman mythology, destiny: usually in the plural, the Destinies, goddesses supposed to preside over the birth, life, and death of human beings. They were three in number, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. Also called, in Latin, Parcæ.
    • Synonyms 1 and 2. Doom, etc. See fate.
    • the ultimate company viewed as predetermining this course of activities (usually personified as a female)
    • your current conditions or symptom in life (including exactly what occurs for you)
    • a conference (or a course of events) that undoubtedly occur someday
    • The supposed power, concept, or energy that predetermines activities.
    • The supposed power, concept, or energy that predetermines activities.
    • The unavoidable occasions predestined by this force.
    • The inevitable activities predestined by this power.
    • A final result or effect; an outcome.
    • your final outcome or outcome; an outcome.
    • bad fate; doom.
    • bad destiny; doom.
    • Greek & Roman Mythology the 3 goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, which control human fate. Combined with the.
    • The cause, power, principle, or divine will that predetermines activities.
    • The effect, outcome, result, or inevitable events predetermined by this cause.
    • Destiny (perhaps connotes demise, ruin, misfortune, etc.).
    • the 3 goddesses (The Fates) of classic European mythology that thought to manage the fate of humans.
    • a hard and fast decree by which the order of things is recommended; the immutable legislation of world; unavoidable prerequisite; the power through which all presence is set and conditioned.
    • Appointed good deal; allocated life; arranged or predetermined event; destiny; specially, the ultimate good deal; doom; damage; death.
    • The part of opportunity in affairs of life; the unexpected and unestimated conitions thought to be a force shaping occasions; fortune; esp., opposing situations against which its useless to fight.
    • The three goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, sometimes called the Destinies, or Parcæwho were likely to determine the program of real human life. They truly are represented, one as holding the distaff, an additional as rotating, in addition to third as cutting off the thread.
    • mainly, a prophetic declaration of just what must certanly be; a divine decree or a hard and fast sentence wherein your order of things is recommended; for this reason, that which is undoubtedly predetermined; destiny ordained and unalterable; that which must be, in spite of all opposing causes. See fatality.
    • whatever originates from necessity and/or power of conditions; an inevitable course or occasion; hence, lot of money, lot, or fate generally: because, it absolutely was his fate to be betrayed by his celebration.
    • Final event; death; destruction.
    • a factor in death and destruction.
    • [capitalized] [L. Fatum, generally in pl. Fata; Gr. Μοῖρα, pl. Μοῖραι.] In Greek and Roman mythology, future: frequently inside plural, the Destinies, goddesses supposed to preside within the delivery, life, and death of human beings. They were three in number, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. Also called, in Latin, Parcæ.
    • Synonyms 1 and 2. Doom, etc. See destiny.
    • the ultimate agency regarded as predetermining the program of occasions (often personified as a female)
    • your current situations or condition in life (including everything that happens for your requirements)
    • a conference (or a course of activities) which will inevitably occur someday
    • Greek & Roman Mythology The three goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, which control personal destiny. Used with the.
    • the main cause, force, concept, or divine will that predetermines events.
    • the result, outcome, result, or inescapable activities predetermined by this cause.
    • Destiny (maybe connotes death, spoil, misfortune, etc.).
    • the 3 goddesses (The Fates) of classic European mythology who are believed to control the fate of human beings.
    • a hard and fast decree wherein the order of things is recommended; the immutable legislation of this world; unavoidable need; the force in which all presence is decided and conditioned.
    • Appointed lot; allocated life; arranged or predetermined event; destiny; specially, the last lot; doom; harm; death.
    • The part of chance into the affairs of life; the unexpected and unestimated conitions considered as a force shaping events; fortune; esp., opposing circumstances against which its ineffective to challenge.
    • The three goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, occasionally called the Destinies, or Parcæwho had been likely to figure out this course of human life. They're represented, one as holding the distaff, an extra as spinning, as well as the 3rd as cutting off the thread.
    • mostly, a prophetic statement of exactly what should be; a divine decree or a set phrase in which your order of things is recommended; for this reason, whatever is inevitably predetermined; destiny ordained and unalterable; what should be, regardless of all opposing forces. See fatality.
    • what originates from necessity or the force of conditions; an inevitable program or occasion; therefore, fortune, great deal, or destiny generally: because, it absolutely was his fate become betrayed by their party.
    • Final occasion; death; destruction.
    • a factor in demise and destruction.
    • [capitalized] [L. Fatum, usually in pl. Fata; Gr. Μοῖρα, pl. Μοῖραι.] In Greek and Roman mythology, fate: generally inside plural, the Destinies, goddesses likely to preside throughout the birth, life, and death of humans. These were three in quantity, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos. Also Referred To As, in Latin, Parcæ.
    • Synonyms 1 and 2. Doom, etc. See fate.
    • the greatest company regarded as predetermining this course of events (often personified as a lady)
    • your current situations or symptom in life (including exactly what occurs to you personally)
    • an event (or a course of occasions) which will undoubtedly happen later on
  • verb:
    • To foreordain or predetermine, which will make inescapable.
    • To foreordain or predetermine, to produce inevitable.
    • decree or designate before you start
    • decree or designate first
    • To foreordain or predetermine, to help make inescapable.
    • decree or designate before you start
    • To foreordain or predetermine, which will make unavoidable.
    • decree or designate before you start

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