faith definition

  • noun:
    • Confident belief in truth, worth, or trustworthiness of a person, concept, or thing.
    • Confident belief when you look at the truth, price, or trustworthiness of one, idea, or thing.
    • opinion that does not sleep on logical proof or material evidence. See Synonyms at belief, trust.
    • Belief that will not sleep on reasonable proof or content evidence. See Synonyms at belief, trust.
    • respect to people or thing; allegiance: maintaining faith with a person's supporters.
    • Christianity The theological virtue defined as protected belief in Jesus and a trusting acceptance of God's will.
    • your body of dogma of a religion: the Muslim belief.
    • a couple of axioms or values.
    • A feeling, conviction, or belief that something does work or genuine, with no proof.
    • A religious belief system.
    • An obligation of loyalty or fidelity as well as the observance of such an obligation.
    • A trust or confidence within the intentions or capabilities of one, item, or ideal.
    • Loyalty to you or thing; allegiance: keeping belief with one's followers.
    • Christianity The theological virtue understood to be protected belief in Jesus and a trusting acceptance of God's might.
    • The body of dogma of a religion: the Muslim belief.
    • A set of principles or beliefs.
    • a sense, conviction, or belief that one thing is true or genuine, with no research.
    • A religious belief system.
    • An obligation of loyalty or fidelity as well as the observance of these an obligation.
    • A trust or self-confidence when you look at the motives or capabilities of you, item, or perfect.
    • Belief; the assent for the mind toward truth of what's stated by another, resting solely and implicitly on his authority and veracity; reliance on testimony.
    • The assent associated with head towards declaration or idea of another, on the floor of this manifest truth of what he utters; company and earnest belief, on likely proof all kinds, especially in reference to important moral truth.
    • The belief within the historic truthfulness of the Scripture narrative, in addition to supernatural beginning of the teachings, sometimes known as historic and speculative belief.
    • The belief when you look at the facts and truth for the Scriptures, with a practical passion for them; specially, that confiding and affectionate belief within the person and work of Christ, which impacts the character and life, and tends to make a guy a genuine Christian, -- called a practical, evangelical, or conserving trust.
    • That which is believed on any subject, whether in science, politics, or religion; particularly (Theol.), something of religious belief of any sort; ; additionally, the creed or belief of a Christian culture or chapel.
    • Fidelity to a single's claims, or allegiance to task, or to one recognized and beloved; commitment.
    • term or honor pledged; guarantee provided; fidelity.
    • Credibility or truth.
    • Belief; the assent of head into the truth of understanding announced by another, resting entirely and implicitly on their authority and veracity; dependence on testimony.
    • The assent regarding the head towards statement or proposition of another, on a lawn of the manifest truth of just what he utters; company and earnest belief, on likely proof any sort, especially in reference to important moral truth.
    • The belief when you look at the historic truthfulness associated with Scripture narrative, plus the supernatural source of the teachings, occasionally called historic and speculative belief.
    • The belief when you look at the details and truth of Scriptures, with a practical passion for all of them; especially, that confiding and affectionate belief when you look at the individual and work of Christ, which impacts the smoothness and life, and makes a man a true Christian, -- labeled as a practical, evangelical, or preserving belief.
    • whatever is believed on any subject, whether in science, politics, or religion; specially (Theol.), something of religious belief of any kind; ; additionally, the creed or belief of a Christian society or chapel.
    • Fidelity to a single's promises, or allegiance to duty, or even you recognized and beloved; loyalty.
    • Word or honor pledged; promise provided; fidelity.
    • Credibility or truth.
    • The assent associated with the brain to the truth of a proposition or declaration for which there isn't complete evidence; belief generally.
    • especially Firm belief based upon self-confidence into the authority and veracity of some other, without upon one's own understanding, reason, or judgment; serious and trustful confidence: since, to possess faith when you look at the testimony of a witness; having trust in a buddy.
    • In a far more limited sense: In theology, religious perception of hidden things of spiritual veneration; a belief established on such spiritual perception.
    • opinion or confidence in you, created upon a perception of his ethical excellence: as, trust in Christ.
    • Intuitive belief.
    • The doctrines or articles which are the topics of belief, specifically of religious belief; a creed; a system of religion; specifically, the Christian religion. See confession of belief, under confession, 3.
    • Recognition of and allegiance into obligations of morals and honor; adherence into legislation of right and wrong, especially in rewarding an individual's guarantee; faithfulness; fidelity; respect.
    • Fidelity expressed in a promise or pledge; a pledge offered.
    • The assent for the mind toward truth of a proposition or declaration which is why there is not complete proof; belief generally.
    • especially Firm belief in relation to confidence in the authority and veracity of another, versus upon an individual's own knowledge, reason, or view; serious and trustful confidence: because, to have trust inside testimony of a witness; to own faith in a pal.
    • In a more limited feeling: In theology, spiritual perception of invisible objects of spiritual veneration; a belief established on these types of spiritual perception.
    • opinion or confidence in an individual, established upon a notion of their ethical quality: since, faith in Christ.
    • Intuitive belief.
    • The doctrines or articles that are the subjects of belief, particularly of religious belief; a creed; something of faith; particularly, the Christian religion. See confession of trust, under confession, 3.
    • Recognition of and allegiance toward responsibilities of morals and honor; adherence towards laws and regulations of right and wrong, especially in fulfilling your vow; faithfulness; fidelity; respect.
    • Fidelity indicated in a promise or pledge; a pledge provided.
    • Credibility; truth.
    • [This phrase is normally paid down to i' faith, or belief: see faith, interj.]
    • Tenets, dogmas, religion.
    • a solid belief in a supernatural power or powers that control personal destiny
    • total confidence in one or plan etc
    • commitment or allegiance to an underlying cause or an individual
    • an institution expressing belief in a divine energy
    • Credibility; truth.
    • [This expression is often paid off to i' faith, or trust: see belief, interj.]
    • Tenets, dogmas, faith.
    • a good belief in a supernatural power or powers that control person fate
    • full confidence in a person or program etc
    • loyalty or allegiance to an underlying cause or one
    • an institution expressing belief in a divine energy
    • Confident belief in truth, value, or trustworthiness of you, concept, or thing.
    • opinion that doesn't rest on rational evidence or content research. See Synonyms at belief, trust.
    • respect to a person or thing; allegiance: maintaining trust with one's supporters.
    • Christianity The theological virtue thought as protected belief in God and a trusting acceptance of Jesus's will.
    • the human body of dogma of a religion: the Muslim belief.
    • a couple of axioms or values.
    • a sense, conviction, or belief that one thing does work or real, without proof.
    • A religious belief system.
    • An obligation of respect or fidelity and the observance of these an obligation.
    • A trust or self-confidence within the motives or capabilities of people, object, or perfect.
    • Belief; the assent of the head on truth of what's declared by another, resting exclusively and implicitly on his expert and veracity; dependence on testimony.
    • The assent of the mind to the statement or proposition of another, on the ground of the manifest truth of what he utters; firm and earnest belief, on probable evidence of any kind, especially in regard to important moral truth.
    • The belief in historical truthfulness of this Scripture narrative, plus the supernatural beginning of the teachings, often known as historical and speculative belief.
    • The belief in the realities and truth regarding the Scriptures, with a practical passion for them; specially, that confiding and affectionate belief in individual and work of Christ, which impacts the character and life, and makes a man a real Christian, -- labeled as a practical, evangelical, or saving trust.
    • whatever is believed on any topic, whether in science, politics, or faith; especially (Theol.), something of spiritual belief of any sort; ; additionally, the creed or belief of a Christian community or church.
    • Fidelity to 1's promises, or allegiance to task, or even people recognized and beloved; commitment.
    • term or honor pledged; pledge provided; fidelity.
    • Credibility or truth.
    • The assent for the mind toward truth of a proposition or declaration which is why there is not full evidence; belief overall.
    • Specifically Firm belief based upon confidence in authority and veracity of some other, versus upon an individual's very own knowledge, explanation, or wisdom; serious and trustful self-confidence: since, to possess belief when you look at the testimony of a witness; to own trust in a friend.
    • In a more limited sense: In theology, religious perception associated with invisible items of religious veneration; a belief launched on such religious perception.
    • opinion or confidence in people, established upon a perception of his ethical quality: because, trust in Christ.
    • Intuitive belief.
    • The doctrines or articles which are the subjects of belief, specially of spiritual belief; a creed; a system of faith; especially, the Christian faith. See confession of faith, under confession, 3.
    • Recognition of and allegiance on obligations of morals and honor; adherence towards the laws and regulations of right and incorrect, particularly in fulfilling your promise; faithfulness; fidelity; respect.
    • Fidelity indicated in a promise or pledge; a pledge given.
    • Credibility; truth.
    • [This phrase is oftentimes reduced to i' belief, or trust: see trust, interj.]
    • principles, dogmas, faith.
    • a powerful belief in a supernatural energy or abilities that control individual future
    • full confidence in someone or plan etc
    • commitment or allegiance to a reason or someone
    • an institution to state belief in a divine power
  • idiom:
    • in trust Without a doubt; really.
    • in trust Without a doubt; truly.
    • in trust Without a doubt; truly.
  • interjection:
    • By my trust; in reality; verily.
    • By my trust; in reality; verily.
    • By my trust; in fact; verily.
  • others:
    • To believe; credit.
    • By my belief; in reality; undoubtedly.
    • to trust; credit.
    • By my faith; in truth; indeed.
    • To believe; credit.
    • By my faith; in reality; undoubtedly.

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