fairy definition

  • noun:
    • a small imaginary being in human kind, depicted as smart, mischievous, and possessing magical capabilities.
    • Offensive Slang applied as a disparaging term for a homosexual guy.
    • the world of faerie; enchantment, illusion.
    • A mythical being that has magical abilities, understood in many sizes and information, although frequently portrayed in contemporary pictures just as tiny and spritely with gauze-like wings; A sprite.
    • a male homosexual, specially person who is effeminate.
    • A nature character revered in modern-day paganism.
    • Enchantment; impression.
    • the nation associated with the fays; land of illusions.
    • An imaginary supernatural being or spirit, designed to assume a person kind (usually diminutive), either man or woman, and also to meddle permanently or evil into the matters of mankind; a fay. See Elf, and Demon.
    • An enchantress.
    • Enchantment; miracle.
    • An imaginary becoming or nature, usually represented at the time of a diminutive and elegant man form, but effective at presuming virtually any, so when playing pranks, frolicsome, kindly, naughty, or spiteful, on humans or among on their own; a fay.
    • Fays collectively; fairy people.
    • Fairy-land; elf-land.
    • An enchantress.
    • Synonyms Fairy, Elf, Fay; Sylph, Gnome; Jinn, Genie; Goblin. Fairy is the most general name for a diminutive imaginary being, generally in human form, sometimes very benevolent or inclined to teach moral lessons, as the fairy godmother of Cinderella; sometimes malevolent in the extreme, as in many fairy stories. Spenser took up the word in Chaucer's spelling, faerie or faery, and gave it an extended meaning, which is now commonly confined to that spelling and to his poem; the personages in “The Faery Queene” live in an unlocated region, essentially like the rest of the world, and are of heroic and occasionally supernatural powers; these personages he sometimes calls elves or elfins. In ordinary use an elf differs from a fairy only in generally seeming young, and being more often mischievous. Pope, in “The Rape of the Lock,” has given a definite cast to sylph and gnome; these two words are elsewhere often associated, gnomes having always been fabled as living in underground abodes, and especially as being the guardians of mines and quarries, while sylphs are denizens of the air. From this difference of place it has followed that gnomes are generally thought of with repugnance or dread, and sylphs, although of both sexes in literature, are popularly thought of as young, slender, and graceful females: hence the expression “a sylph-like form.” To Oriental imagination is due the jinn, djinn, or jinnee; the form genie is most vividly associated with the “Arabian Nights”: as, the genie of Aladdin's lamp; the genie that the fisherman let out of the bottle. A goblin is wicked, mischievous, or at least roguish, and frightful or grotesque in appearance. See the definitions of kobold, sylph, brownie, banshee, sprite, pixie, nixie, nymph, etc.
    • a small being, person in type, playful and achieving magical abilities
    • unpleasant term for an openly homosexual guy
    • a little imaginary becoming in individual kind, depicted as smart, mischievous, and having magical powers.
    • Offensive Slang applied as a disparaging term for a homosexual guy.
    • the realm of faerie; enchantment, illusion.
    • A mythical being who'd magical abilities, known in a lot of sizes and descriptions, although frequently portrayed in contemporary illustrations just as tiny and spritely with gauze-like wings; A sprite.
    • a male homosexual, specifically a person who is effeminate.
    • A nature character revered in modern paganism.
    • Enchantment; impression.
    • the united states associated with the fays; land of illusions.
    • An imaginary supernatural being or character, supposed to believe a person kind (usually diminutive), either man or woman, and meddle permanently or wicked inside matters of mankind; a fay. See Elf, and Demon.
    • An enchantress.
    • A tiny imaginary being in individual type, depicted as smart, naughty, and possessing magical capabilities.
    • Offensive Slang applied as a disparaging term for a homosexual man.
    • the realm of faerie; enchantment, illusion.
    • A mythical being who'd magical capabilities, understood in several sizes and information, although usually depicted in modern-day illustrations only as tiny and spritely with gauze-like wings; A sprite.
    • a male homosexual, particularly person who is effeminate.
    • Enchantment; magic.
    • An imaginary being or nature, typically represented since a diminutive and elegant person kind, but effective at assuming any, and as playing pranks, frolicsome, kindly, mischievous, or spiteful, on human beings or among on their own; a fay.
    • Fays collectively; fairy folk.
    • Fairy-land; elf-land.
    • An enchantress.
    • Synonyms Fairy, Elf, Fay; Sylph, Gnome; Jinn, Genie; Goblin. Fairy is the most general title for a diminutive imaginary being, generally in human type, often really benevolent or inclined to show moral classes, as fairy godmother of Cinderella; sometimes malevolent when you look at the severe, as with numerous fairy tales. Spenser used the term in Chaucer's spelling, faerie or faery, and provided it an extended definition, that is today generally restricted to this spelling and their poem; the personages in “The Faery Queene” inhabit an unlocated region, essentially such as the remaining world, and so are of brave and sometimes supernatural abilities; these personages he occasionally calls elves or elfins. In ordinary use an elf varies from a fairy just in typically appearing younger, and being more regularly mischievous. Pope, in “The Rape of Lock,” gave a definite cast to sylph and gnome; these two terms tend to be in other places often connected, gnomes having always been fabled as residing in underground abodes, and particularly being the guardians of mines and quarries, while sylphs are denizens associated with atmosphere. Out of this distinction of stick it has actually followed that gnomes are generally thought of with repugnance or fear, and sylphs, although of both sexes in literature, tend to be popularly thought of as youthful, slim, and graceful females: thus the expression “a sylph-like form.” To Oriental imagination is born the jinn, djinn, or jinnee; the form genie is most clearly associated with the “Arabian Nights”: as, the genie of Aladdin's lamp; the genie your fisherman let out associated with the container. A goblin is sinful, mischievous, or at the least roguish, and frightful or grotesque to look at. Begin to see the meanings of kobold, sylph, brownie, banshee, sprite, pixie, nixie, nymph, etc.
    • a small being, peoples in form, playful and achieving magical abilities
    • offensive term for an openly homosexual man
    • A nature character revered in modern-day paganism.
    • Enchantment; illusion.
    • the nation for the fays; land of illusions.
    • An imaginary supernatural being or nature, supposed to believe a person kind (usually diminutive), either male or female, and also to meddle permanently or evil in affairs of humanity; a fay. See Elf, and Demon.
    • An enchantress.
    • Enchantment; miracle.
    • An imaginary being or spirit, usually represented by a diminutive and graceful personal form, but capable of presuming any other, and as playing pranks, frolicsome, kindly, naughty, or spiteful, on people or among by themselves; a fay.
    • Fays collectively; fairy folk.
    • Fairy-land; elf-land.
    • An enchantress.
    • Synonyms Fairy, Elf, Fay; Sylph, Gnome; Jinn, Genie; Goblin. Fairy is one of general name for a diminutive imaginary being, usually in real human type, sometimes extremely benevolent or inclined to instruct moral lessons, given that fairy godmother of Cinderella; sometimes malevolent into the extreme, such as numerous fairy tales. Spenser took up the phrase in Chaucer's spelling, faerie or faery, and gave it a long meaning, which will be now commonly confined to this spelling and to his poem; the personages in “The Faery Queene” are now living in an unlocated area, really like rest of the globe, consequently they are of heroic and periodically supernatural powers; these personages he sometimes calls elves or elfins. In ordinary use an elf differs from a fairy only in generally speaking seeming younger, and being more regularly mischievous. Pope, in “The Rape associated with Lock,” gave an absolute cast to sylph and gnome; those two words are somewhere else frequently linked, gnomes having for ages been fabled as staying in underground abodes, and especially as the guardians of mines and quarries, while sylphs tend to be denizens associated with the environment. With this distinction of stick it has actually used that gnomes are generally thought of with repugnance or dread, and sylphs, although of both sexes in literature, tend to be popularly thought of as young, slim, and graceful females: thus the appearance “a sylph-like kind.” To Oriental imagination is due the jinn, djinn, or jinnee; the shape genie is most vividly from the “Arabian Nights”: as, the genie of Aladdin's lamp; the genie that fisherman let-out of bottle. A goblin is wicked, naughty, or at least roguish, and frightful or grotesque to look at. Look at meanings of kobold, sylph, brownie, banshee, sprite, pixie, nixie, nymph, etc.
    • a little being, real human in form, playful and having magical powers
    • unpleasant term for an openly homosexual man
  • adjective:
    • Of or related to fairies.
    • written by fairies.
    • Of or regarding fairies.
    • written by fairies.
    • Of or pertaining to fairies.
    • written by fairies.
  • others:
    • regarding or in some manner related to fairies; done-by or from fairies. See expressions below.
    • Resembling for some reason a fairy; thus, fanciful, graceful, whimsical, fantastic, etc.: as, fairy animals or favors.
    • regarding or perhaps in some manner related to fairies; done-by or via fairies. See expressions below.
    • Resembling for some reason a fairy; for this reason, fanciful, elegant, whimsical, fantastic, etc.: as, fairy creatures or favors.
    • with respect to or perhaps in some way linked to fairies; done by or from fairies. See phrases below.
    • Resembling one way or another a fairy; ergo, fanciful, graceful, whimsical, great, etc.: as, fairy animals or favors.

Related Sources

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