evidence definition

  • noun:
    • A thing or things useful in forming a conclusion or judgment: The broken window ended up being evidence that a burglary had occurred. Scientists weigh the data pros and cons a hypothesis.
    • One thing indicative; an outward sign: proof grief on a mourner's face.
    • Law The documentary or oral statements in addition to product things admissible as testimony in a court of law.
    • Facts or findings presented meant for an assertion.
    • such a thing admitted by a court to prove or disprove alleged things of-fact in a trial.
    • That which makes obvious or manifest; that which furnishes, or sometimes furnish, evidence; any mode of evidence; the ground of belief or judgement
    • one that holds witness.
    • That which is lawfully submitted to skilled tribunal, as a way of ascertaining the truth of any alleged matter-of-fact under research before it; ways making evidence; -- the latter, purely talking, not being synonymous with evidence, but rather the effect of it.
    • The state to be evident, obvious, or simple, rather than liable to question or matter; evidentness; clearness; plainness; certitude. See mediate and immediate proof, etc., below.
    • The means by which the presence or non-existence and/or truth or falsehood of an alleged simple truth is ascertained or made obvious; testimony; experience; for this reason, more usually, the facts where reasoning from impact to cause is based; what makes obvious or basic; the experiential premises of a proof.
    • Specifically, in law: A deed; an instrument or document through which an undeniable fact is created obvious: since, evidences of title (that is, title-deeds); evidences of debt (this is certainly, written responsibilities to pay money).
    • one that provides testimony or proof; a witness: today utilized chiefly in the expression “turning condition's (or queen's) research.”
    • Information, whether consisting of the testimony of witnesses and/or items of documents, or produced by assessment of items, which has a tendency, or is presented as tending, to create clear the simple fact in question in a legal investigation or test; testimony: since, he offered proof great character.
    • In a far more restricted feeling, that part of such information or testimony which is correctly receivable or has actually in fact been obtained by the judge regarding trial of a problem: occasionally much more especially characterized as judicial evidence: as, that isn't proof, my lord; the age of the accused is certainly not in evidence. In this latter feeling occasionally, especially in equity training, spoken of because the proofs.
    • the guidelines in which the reception of testimony is managed in courts of justice: as, a treatise on proof; professor of pleading and evidence.
    • clearly noticeable; conspicuous: a recent phraseadopted through the French en research.
    • Testimony to using witnessed an act or event, as distinguished from unfavorable proof, or even the testimony of a witness who was simply present and watchful, that these types of act or occasion would not take place. As between equally credible witnesses, positive testimony is entitled to more excess weight than bad, since it might that certain experience, though present, couldn't see or hear whatever another witness performed.
    • Research sufficient not just to go directly to the jury, but to need them to locate consequently if no legitimate contrary research be provided with.
    • (legislation) most of the means where any alleged matter of fact whose facts are investigated at judicial test is made or disproved
    • a sign which makes one thing obvious
    • your basis for belief or disbelief; understanding by which to base belief
    • A thing or things helpful in creating a conclusion or judgment: The broken screen had been proof that a burglary had taken place. Researchers weigh evidence for and against a hypothesis.
    • Something indicative; an outward sign: proof of grief on a mourner's face.
    • Law The documentary or dental statements and material items admissible as testimony in a court of law.
    • Facts or findings provided meant for an assertion.
    • something admitted by a court to show or disprove so-called matters of-fact in a trial.
    • what makes obvious or manifest; whatever furnishes, or will furnish, proof; any mode of evidence; the floor of belief or judgement
    • One who holds witness.
    • That which is legitimately posted to competent tribunal, as a method of ascertaining the truth of every so-called matter-of-fact under examination before it; way of making evidence; -- the latter, strictly talking, not being similar to evidence, but alternatively the consequence of it.
    • their state to be evident, clear, or basic, and not prone to question or question; evidentness; clearness; plainness; certitude. See mediate and instant evidence, etc., below.
    • The means by which the presence or non-existence and/or truth or falsehood of an alleged simple truth is ascertained or made evident; testimony; experience; thus, more typically, the reality upon which reasoning from result to cause is situated; that which makes evident or simple; the experiential premises of a proof.
    • Specifically, in-law: A deed; an instrument or document through which an undeniable fact is made obvious: since, evidences of subject (that is, title-deeds); evidences of debt (which, written obligations to pay money).
    • a person who provides testimony or evidence; a witness: today used chiefly into the term “turning condition's (or queen's) proof.”
    • Information, whether comprising the testimony of witnesses or the items of papers, or produced by assessment of items, which has a tendency, or is presented as tending, which will make clear the actual fact under consideration in a legal examination or trial; testimony: since, he provided evidence of good character.
    • In a far more limited feeling, that section of such information or testimony which can be properly receivable or has actually already been gotten by the judge on trial of an issue: often much more particularly characterized as judicial evidence: as, that is not research, my lord; age the accused is certainly not in research. In this latter sense often, especially in equity training, talked of whilst the proofs.
    • the guidelines by which the reception of testimony is controlled in process of law of justice: as, a treatise on research; teacher of pleading and evidence.
    • Plainly noticeable; conspicuous: a recent phraseadopted from the French en evidence.
    • Testimony to presenting experienced an act or event, as distinguished from bad proof, and/or testimony of a witness who was simply present and observant, that these types of act or event failed to happen. As between similarly credible witnesses, good testimony is eligible for more weight than bad, because it can be that certain witness, though current, couldn't see or hear that which another witness performed.
    • Research sufficient not only to go directly to the jury, but to need all of them to find appropriately if no credible contrary evidence be provided with.
    • (law) all the means by which any so-called point in fact whoever truth is examined at judicial test is established or disproved
    • an illustration which makes something evident
    • your foundation for belief or disbelief; understanding on which to base belief
  • verb-transitive:
    • To indicate demonstrably; exemplify or prove.
    • to guide by testimony; attest.
    • To make obvious or clear; to show; to evince.
    • to point obviously; exemplify or show.
    • to guide by testimony; attest.
    • To make evident or clear; to prove; to evince.
  • idiom:
    • in research clearly noticeable; to be seen: it absolutely was early, and few pedestrians were in evidence regarding city roads.
    • in research legislation As appropriate research: posted the photograph in proof.
    • in evidence Plainly visible; to be noticed: it absolutely was early, and couple of pedestrians had been in research on the town roads.
    • in research legislation As appropriate evidence: posted the photograph in proof.
  • verb:
    • To provide research for, or advise the reality of.
    • give evidence
    • provide proof for; stand as proof; program by one's behavior, attitude, or additional attributes
    • supply proof for
    • To provide research for, or suggest the truth of.
    • give evidence
    • provide proof for; stand as proof of; program by a person's behavior, attitude, or additional characteristics
    • supply research for
  • others:
    • to produce obvious or obvious; show plainly; show.
    • To attest or help by evidence or testimony; experience.
    • To make evident or obvious; tv show plainly; prove.
    • To attest or help by evidence or testimony; experience.

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