epode definition

  • noun:
    • A lyric poem characterized by couplets created by a long line followed closely by a shorter one.
    • the 3rd unit of triad of a Pindaric ode, having an unusual or contrasting type from compared to the strophe and antistrophe.
    • The section of a choral ode in traditional Greek drama following the strophe and antistrophe and sung while the chorus is standing still.
    • The after track; the section of a lyric ode which uses the strophe and antistrophe.
    • A kind of lyric poem, designed by Archilochus, for which a longer verse is followed closely by a shorter one.
    • The after tune; the element of a lyric ode which follows the strophe and antistrophe, -- the old ode being divided into strophe, antistrophe, and epode.
    • A species of lyric poem, conceived by Archilochus, for which an extended verse is followed closely by a shorter one. It will not range from the elegiac distich.
    • In old prosody: a 3rd and metrically different system subjoined to two systems (the strophe and antistrophe) that are metrically identical or corresponsive, and creating using them one pericope or number of methods.
    • A shorter colon, subjoined to an extended colon, and constituting one period with-it; especially, such a colon, as another line or verse, creating either the second line of a distich and/or final line of a method or stanza. Given that closing verse of a system, often called ephymnium.
    • A poem comprising such distichs.
    • exclusively In songs, a refrain or burden.
    • A lyric poem characterized by couplets formed by a long line followed closely by a shorter one.
    • the next unit regarding the triad of a Pindaric ode, having another type of or contrasting type from compared to the strophe and antistrophe.
    • The element of a choral ode in classical Greek crisis following the strophe and antistrophe and sung whilst chorus is standing however.
    • The after song; the section of a lyric ode which employs the strophe and antistrophe.
    • some sort of lyric poem, designed by Archilochus, for which a longer verse is followed closely by a shorter one.
    • The after song; the section of a lyric ode which follows the strophe and antistrophe, -- the ancient ode becoming split into strophe, antistrophe, and epode.
    • A species of lyric poem, developed by Archilochus, by which a lengthier verse is accompanied by a shorter one. It does not are the elegiac distich.
    • In old prosody: A third and metrically different system subjoined to two methods (the strophe and antistrophe) that are metrically identical or corresponsive, and developing using them one pericope or group of systems.
    • A shorter colon, subjoined to an extended colon, and constituting one period with it; particularly, these types of a colon, as a separate line or verse, developing either the 2nd distinct a distich or perhaps the last distinct a method or stanza. As closing verse of a method, sometimes called ephymnium.
    • A poem comprising such distichs.
    • particularly In music, a refrain or burden.
    • A lyric poem characterized by couplets created by a long line followed closely by a shorter one.
    • A lyric poem described as couplets created by a lengthy line followed closely by a shorter one.
    • The third division associated with triad of a Pindaric ode, having a different sort of or contrasting type from that the strophe and antistrophe.
    • The section of a choral ode in ancient Greek crisis after the strophe and antistrophe and sung although the chorus is standing still.
    • The after track; the section of a lyric ode which uses the strophe and antistrophe.
    • some sort of lyric poem, created by Archilochus, where a lengthier verse is followed by a shorter one.
    • The after song; the section of a lyric ode which employs the strophe and antistrophe, -- the old ode becoming split into strophe, antistrophe, and epode.
    • A species of lyric poem, designed by Archilochus, which an extended verse is followed closely by a shorter one. It generally does not through the elegiac distich.
    • In ancient prosody: A third and metrically various system subjoined to two methods (the strophe and antistrophe) which are metrically identical or corresponsive, and developing using them one pericope or band of systems.
    • A shorter colon, subjoined to a longer colon, and constituting one period along with it; especially, such a colon, as a separate range or verse, creating either the 2nd line of a distich and/or last line of something or stanza. Since the closing verse of a method, occasionally known as ephymnium.
    • A poem comprising these types of distichs.
    • particularly In music, a refrain or burden.
    • the 3rd division associated with the triad of a Pindaric ode, having another or contrasting type from that of the strophe and antistrophe.
    • The element of a choral ode in ancient Greek drama following strophe and antistrophe and sung whilst chorus is standing nevertheless.
    • The after track; the section of a lyric ode which employs the strophe and antistrophe.
    • A kind of lyric poem, conceived by Archilochus, which a lengthier verse is followed closely by a shorter one.
    • The after song; the section of a lyric ode which employs the strophe and antistrophe, -- the ancient ode being divided in to strophe, antistrophe, and epode.
    • A species of lyric poem, conceived by Archilochus, where a longer verse is followed by a shorter one. It generally does not are the elegiac distich.
    • In old prosody: a 3rd and metrically various system subjoined to two systems (the strophe and antistrophe) that are metrically identical or corresponsive, and developing using them one pericope or band of systems.
    • A shorter colon, subjoined to a lengthier colon, and constituting one period along with it; particularly, these types of a colon, as another range or verse, developing either the second type of a distich or even the last distinct a system or stanza. While the closing verse of a method, often known as ephymnium.
    • A poem composed of these types of distichs.
    • particularly In songs, a refrain or burden.

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