epicycle definition

  • noun:
    • In Ptolemaic cosmology, a tiny circle, the middle of which progresses the circumference of a bigger circle at whose center could be the earth additionally the circumference of which describes the orbit of just one of planets round the planet.
    • Mathematics A circle whoever circumference rolls over the circumference of a hard and fast circle, therefore producing an epicycloid or a hypocycloid.
    • A small group whoever centre is on the circumference of a bigger circle; in Ptolemaic astronomy it had been viewed as the basis of change of this "seven planets", provided a fixed central planet.
    • Any circle whoever circumference rolls around that of another circle, thus producing a hypocycloid or epicycloid.
    • A circle, whose center moves round into the circumference of a higher group; or a tiny group, whose center, becoming fixed inside deferent of a planet, is carried combined with the deferent, yet, by a unique distinct motion, carries the human body of the earth fastened to it round its appropriate center.
    • A circle which rolls regarding the circumference of some other group, either externally or internally.
    • A circle going upon or around another group, among several wheels revolving round a common axis. See epicyclic train, under epicyclic.
    • inside Ptolemaic system of astronomy, slightly circle, conceived for explanation of planetary motion, whoever center was designed to move round in the circumference of a higher circle; a tiny circle whose center, being fixed into the deferent of a planet, was allowed to be held along with the deferent, yet by its very own peculiar motion to transport the body of the planet fastened to it round its appropriate center. Copernicus in addition made use of epicycles, which, but had been banished by Kepler.
    • In mod. astron., sometimes used for the geocentric course of a planet, or its course relative to the earth considered fixed.
    • a circle that rolls around (inside or exterior) another circle; yields an epicycloid or hypocycloid
    • In Ptolemaic cosmology, a tiny group, the biggest market of which progresses the circumference of a bigger group at whose center may be the earth as well as the circumference which defines the orbit of 1 of this planets round the planet.
    • Mathematics A circle whose circumference rolls over the circumference of a hard and fast circle, thereby producing an epicycloid or a hypocycloid.
    • a little group whoever centre is on circumference of a more substantial circle; in Ptolemaic astronomy it had been regarded as the cornerstone of change of "seven planets", given a set central Earth.
    • Any circle whose circumference rolls around that another group, thus generating a hypocycloid or epicycloid.
    • A circle, whose center moves round within the circumference of a larger circle; or a little group, whoever center, being fixed inside deferent of a planet, is held combined with the deferent, but, by its strange movement, holds the body for the planet fastened to it round its correct center.
    • A circle which rolls on circumference of another group, either externally or internally.
    • In Ptolemaic cosmology, a tiny circle, the middle of which moves on the circumference of a more substantial circle at whose center is the earth and also the circumference that defines the orbit of 1 associated with planets all over earth.
    • Mathematics A circle whoever circumference rolls across the circumference of a hard and fast circle, therefore generating an epicycloid or a hypocycloid.
    • a tiny circle whoever centre is regarding circumference of a bigger group; in Ptolemaic astronomy it had been viewed as the cornerstone of change associated with "seven planets", provided a fixed central Earth.
    • A circle going upon or about another circle, among many tires revolving round a typical axis. See epicyclic train, under epicyclic.
    • inside Ptolemaic system of astronomy, a little circle, conceived when it comes to explanation of planetary motion, whoever center ended up being designed to go round in the circumference of a better group; a little circle whoever center, becoming fixed in deferent of a planet, ended up being supposed to be carried combined with deferent, yet by a unique strange motion to transport your body regarding the world fastened to it round its appropriate center. Copernicus in addition used epicycles, which, however, had been banished by Kepler.
    • Any group whoever circumference rolls around compared to another group, thus producing a hypocycloid or epicycloid.
    • In mod. astron., sometimes useful for the geocentric path of a planet, or its course relative to the planet earth considered fixed.
    • A circle, whoever center moves round in the circumference of a better circle; or a little circle, whoever center, becoming fixed into the deferent of a planet, is held combined with deferent, yet, by unique unusual motion, carries the human body associated with world fastened to it round its proper center.
    • a circle that moves around (inside or exterior) another group; produces an epicycloid or hypocycloid
    • A circle which rolls on the circumference of some other circle, either externally or internally.
    • A circle moving upon or around another group, as one of some tires revolving round a typical axis. See epicyclic train, under epicyclic.
    • inside Ptolemaic system of astronomy, just a little group, conceived for explanation of planetary movement, whose center had been expected to go round when you look at the circumference of a larger group; a little group whose center, becoming fixed within the deferent of a planet, had been supposed to be held combined with the deferent, but by its own strange motion to carry your body of this world fastened to it round its proper center. Copernicus additionally used epicycles, which, however, were banished by Kepler.
    • In mod. astron., sometimes used for the geocentric course of a planet, or its course in accordance with the planet earth viewed as fixed.
    • a circle that rolls around (inside or outside) another circle; creates an epicycloid or hypocycloid
    • In Ptolemaic cosmology, a little group, the center of which progresses the circumference of a bigger circle at whose center could be the earth and the circumference that describes the orbit of 1 regarding the planets across the earth.
    • Mathematics A circle whose circumference rolls across the circumference of a fixed circle, thus creating an epicycloid or a hypocycloid.
    • a tiny circle whose centre is regarding circumference of a bigger circle; in Ptolemaic astronomy it was seen as the basis of change of "seven planets", offered a fixed main Earth.
    • Any circle whose circumference rolls around compared to another group, hence creating a hypocycloid or epicycloid.
    • A circle, whoever center moves round in the circumference of a better group; or a small circle, whose center, being fixed when you look at the deferent of a planet, is carried combined with the deferent, but, by its very own unusual movement, holds the human body associated with the planet fastened to it round its correct center.
    • A circle which rolls from the circumference of another group, either externally or internally.
    • A circle moving upon or around another group, as one of some tires revolving round a typical axis. See epicyclic train, under epicyclic.
    • inside Ptolemaic system of astronomy, a little circle, conceived when it comes to explanation of planetary movement, whoever center was expected to go round into the circumference of a larger group; a tiny group whoever center, being fixed when you look at the deferent of a planet, had been allowed to be carried combined with deferent, yet by its own distinct movement to carry your body associated with world fastened to it round its correct center. Copernicus also utilized epicycles, which, however, were banished by Kepler.
    • In mod. astron., sometimes used for the geocentric road of a planet, or its road in accordance with our planet thought to be fixed.
    • a circle that rolls around (inside or outside) another group; makes an epicycloid or hypocycloid

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