elegiac definition

  • adjective:
    • Of, regarding, or involving elegy or mourning or articulating sadness for the which is irrecoverably past: an elegiac lament for youthful ideals.
    • Of or composed in elegiac couplets.
    • Of, or relating to an elegy.
    • Expressing sadness or mourning.
    • owned by elegy, or printed in elegiacs; plaintive; expressing sadness or lamentation
    • Used in elegies
    • expressing sorrow frequently for one thing past
    • resembling or feature of or appropriate to an elegy
    • Of, concerning, or concerning elegy or mourning or expressing sorrow for the which is irrecoverably previous: an elegiac lament for youthful ideals.
    • Of or composed in elegiac couplets.
    • Of, or relating to an elegy.
    • Expressing sorrow or mourning.
    • owned by elegy, or written in elegiacs; plaintive; expressing sorrow or lamentation
    • found in elegies
    • Of, relating to, or concerning elegy or mourning or expressing sadness for the which will be irrecoverably previous: an elegiac lament for youthful beliefs.
    • Of or composed in elegiac couplets.
    • Of, or relating to an elegy.
    • revealing sorrow or mourning.
    • Belonging to elegy, or written in elegiacs; plaintive; expressing sorrow or lamentation
    • articulating sorrow usually for anything past
    • Used in elegies
    • resembling or feature of or appropriate to an elegy
    • articulating sadness often for one thing past
    • resembling or feature of or appropriate to an elegy
  • noun:
    • A poem composed in couplet model of classical elegies: a line of dactylic hexameter followed by a line of dactylic pentameter
    • Elegiac verse.
    • A pentameter, or verse comprising two dactylic penthemims or written in elegiac meter.
    • A poem composed inside couplet style of classical elegies: a line of dactylic hexameter followed by a line of dactylic pentameter
    • A poem composed inside couplet style of traditional elegies: a line of dactylic hexameter followed by a line of dactylic pentameter
    • Elegiac verse.
    • A pentameter, or verse comprising two dactylic penthemims or written in elegiac meter.
    • Elegiac verse.
    • A pentameter, or verse comprising two dactylic penthemims or written in elegiac meter.
  • others:
    • In ancient prosody, an epithet noting a distich the very first type of that is a dactylic hexameter together with 2nd a pentameter, or verse differing from the hexameter by suppression associated with the arsis or metrically unaccented an element of the 3rd together with sixth foot, hence:
    • Verses or poems composed of elegiac distichs are known as elegiac verses or poems (elegiacs); poetry composed inside meter, elegiac verse or poetry (the elegy); and also the article writers just who employed this verse, especially those that employed it exclusively or by choice, are known as the elegiac poets. Elegiac verse appears to have been utilized mainly in threnetic pieces (poems lamenting or commemorating the lifeless), or even to have-been of songs of a form regarded because of the Greeks as mournful. Almost from the very first appearance in literature, however, it is located used for compositions of numerous types. The principal Roman elegiac poets tend to be Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. In modern-day German literature the elegiac meter is frequently used, specially by Goethe and Schiller. Coleridge's translation from the latter poet may serve as a good example in English.
    • Belonging to an elegy, or even elegy; relating to elegies.
    • Expressing sadness or lamentation: because, elegiac strains.
    • A succession of distichs consisting every one of a dactylic hexameter and a dipenthemim; a poem or poems such distichs: since, the Heroides and Tristia of Ovid are written in elegiacs. See I.
    • In ancient prosody, an epithet noting a distich 1st distinct that will be a dactylic hexameter and also the second a pentameter, or verse differing through the hexameter by suppression associated with the arsis or metrically unaccented the main 3rd and also the 6th base, thus:
    • Verses or poems consisting of elegiac distichs are known as elegiac verses or poems (elegiacs); poetry composed in this meter, elegiac verse or poetry (the elegy); additionally the writers which employed this verse, especially those who employed it solely or by inclination, tend to be referred to as elegiac poets. Elegiac verse seemingly have already been made use of mainly in threnetic pieces (poems lamenting or commemorating the lifeless), or even have already been related to music of a sort regarded by the Greeks as mournful. Practically from its first look in literature, however, it is located used for compositions of various kinds. The principal Roman elegiac poets tend to be Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. In contemporary German literature the elegiac meter has been commonly used, specifically by Goethe and Schiller. Coleridge's translation through the latter poet may serve as a good example in English.
    • owned by an elegy, or even to elegy; having to do with elegies.
    • Expressing sorrow or lamentation: as, elegiac strains.
    • A succession of distichs consisting all of a dactylic hexameter and a dipenthemim; a poem or poems this kind of distichs: since, the Heroides and Tristia of Ovid are printed in elegiacs. See I.
    • In ancient prosody, an epithet noting a distich initial type of that is a dactylic hexameter together with 2nd a pentameter, or verse varying through the hexameter by suppression for the arsis or metrically unaccented part of the third and also the sixth foot, therefore:
    • passages or poems comprising elegiac distichs are known as elegiac verses or poems (elegiacs); poetry composed inside meter, elegiac verse or poetry (the elegy); in addition to authors who employed this verse, especially those who employed it exclusively or by preference, tend to be known as the elegiac poets. Elegiac verse seems to have already been made use of mainly in threnetic pieces (poems lamenting or commemorating the dead), or even to are connected with music of a sort regarded by the Greeks as mournful. Very nearly from the first appearance in literature, however, it is available employed for compositions of varied sorts. The principal Roman elegiac poets are Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid. In modern-day German literary works the elegiac meter has-been frequently employed, specially by Goethe and Schiller. Coleridge's interpretation from the second poet may serve as a good example in English.
    • owned by an elegy, or to elegy; relating to elegies.
    • Expressing sadness or lamentation: as, elegiac strains.
    • A succession of distichs consisting all of a dactylic hexameter and a dipenthemim; a poem or poems such distichs: as, the Heroides and Tristia of Ovid are written in elegiacs. See I.

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