dolphin definition

  • noun:
    • Any of different marine cetacean animals, including the bottle-nosed dolphin, of this family Delphinidae, pertaining to the whales but usually smaller and achieving a beaklike snout.
    • a sizable marine meals and game fish (Coryphaena hippurus) found global in exotic seas, having an iridescent blue back, yellow edges, a steep blunt forehead, and an extended continuous dorsal fin. Also called dolphinfish, dorado, mahi-mahi.
    • an identical fish (C. equisetis) of smaller size, having silvery or pale yellow sides. Also called dolphinfish, pompano dolphin.
    • A buoy, heap, or selection of piles used for mooring boats.
    • a team of piers used as a fender at a dock.
    • A carnivorous aquatic mammal inhabiting mostly in the shallower seas of the continental shelves, famed for its intelligence and occasional willingness to approach humans.
    • A fish, the mahi-mahi or dorado, systematic name Coryphaena hippurus, with a dorsal fin that operates the length of the human body, also known for iridescent coloration.
    • The dauphin, eldest boy associated with leaders of France.
    • A man-made semi submerged maritime structure, often set up to provide a set structure for short-term mooring, to prevent boats from drifting to shallow water or even act as base for navigational aids.
    • A cetacean regarding the genus Delphinus and allied genera (esp. Delphinus delphis); the actual dolphin.
    • The Coryphæna hippuris, a fish of about five feet in length, celebrated for its surprising changes of color when dying. It is the fish commonly known as the dolphin. The term is also applied to the related Coryphaena equisetis. Called also dolphinfish and (especially in Hawaii) mahimahi. See also dolphinfish and Coryphænoid.
    • A mass of metal or lead hung from yardarm, in readiness become fallen in the deck of an enemy's vessel.
    • Any of numerous marine cetacean animals, for instance the bottle-nosed dolphin, of the family Delphinidae, linked to the whales but typically smaller and having a beaklike snout.
    • a sizable marine food and game fish (Coryphaena hippurus) discovered globally in exotic oceans, having an iridescent blue back, yellowish sides, a steep blunt forehead, and an extended continuous dorsal fin. Also referred to as dolphinfish, dorado, mahi-mahi.
    • A similar seafood (C. equisetis) of smaller size, having silvery or pale-yellow sides. Also known as dolphinfish, pompano dolphin.
    • A buoy, stack, or band of piles used for mooring boats.
    • A group of piers used as a fender at a dock.
    • A carnivorous aquatic mammal inhabiting mainly in the shallower seas of the continental shelves, famous because of its intelligence and periodic readiness to approach people.
    • A fish, the mahi-mahi or dorado, medical name Coryphaena hippurus, with a dorsal fin that runs the length of the body, identified for iridescent color.
    • A kind of wreath or band of plaited cordage.
    • The dauphin, eldest son of the kings of France.
    • A spar or buoy held by an anchor and furnished with a ring that boats may fasten their cables.
    • A mooring post on a wharf or beach.
    • A permanent fender around much boat just beneath the gunwale.
    • In old ordnance, among the handles over the trunnions where a cannon ended up being lifted.
    • A small constellation between Aquila and Pegasus. See Delphinus, n., 2.
    • The popular title associated with cetaceous animals associated with household Delphinidæ and genus Delphinus, most of that are also referred to as and more usually called porpoises, this term becoming interchangeable with dolphin.
    • A general and well-known title of fish associated with household Coryphænidæ: so called from some con-fusion with all the animals of the identical title.
    • In Gr. antiquity, a ponderous size of lead or metal suspended from a unique garden on a naval vessel, and, if chance introduced, allow belong to the your hands on a hostile ship to sink the woman by breaking through the woman base.
    • Nautical: A spar or buoy made quickly to an anchor, and usually given a ring to enable vessels to ride because of it.
    • A mooring-post placed in the entrance of a dock.
    • A man-made semi submerged maritime framework, usually put in to give you a hard and fast framework for temporary mooring, to stop ships from drifting to shallow-water or to serve as base for navigational aids.
    • A cetacean of genus Delphinus and allied genera (esp. Delphinus delphis); the true dolphin.
    • The Coryphæna hippuris, a fish around five legs long, celebrated for its astonishing changes of shade when dying. This is the fish often called the dolphin. The term is also applied to the relevant Coryphaena equisetis. Known as in addition dolphinfish and (especially in Hawaii) mahimahi. See in addition dolphinfish and Coryphænoid.
    • A mass of iron or lead hung through the yardarm, in ability to be fallen in the deck of an enemy's vessel.
    • some sort of wreath or band of plaited cordage.
    • A spar or buoy held by an anchor and furnished with a ring that boats may fasten their cables.
    • A mooring post on a wharf or beach.
    • A permanent fender around much vessel just underneath the gunwale.
    • at the beginning of artillery, a handle cast solid on a cannon.
    • [capitalized] In astronomy, an old northern constellation, Delphinus (which see).
    • In architecture, a technical term placed on the pipeline and cover at a source for the availability of water.
    • In Christian archæol., a picture or representation of a dolphin, constituting an emblem of love, diligence, and swiftness.
    • just like dauphin.
    • In lumbering, a cluster of heaps that a boom is guaranteed. [U. S.]
    • identical to dolphin-fly.
    • any one of different small-toothed whales with a beaklike snout; bigger than porpoises
    • huge thin meals and game seafood extensively distributed in cozy seas (especially around Hawaii)
    • In old ordnance, among the handles above the trunnions through which a cannon was raised.
    • A small constellation between Aquila and Pegasus. See Delphinus, n., 2.
    • The popular name for the cetaceous animals regarding the household Delphinidæ and genus Delphinus, almost all of which are also referred to as plus frequently called porpoises, this word becoming interchangeable with dolphin.
    • A general and preferred title of seafood of the household Coryphænidæ: so named from some con-fusion with all the animals of the same name.
    • In Gr. antiquity, a ponderous mass of lead or metal suspended from a particular lawn on a naval vessel, and, if chance presented, allow fall under the your hands on a hostile ship to sink the woman by breaking through her base.
    • Nautical: A spar or buoy made fast to an anchor, and often given a ring allow vessels to ride by it.
    • A mooring-post put in the entrance of a dock.
    • In early artillery, a handle cast solid on a cannon.
    • [capitalized] In astronomy, an ancient northern constellation, Delphinus (which see).
    • In structure, a technical term placed on the pipe and address at a source for the availability of liquid.
    • In Christian archæol., a graphic or representation of a dolphin, constituting an emblem of love, diligence, and swiftness.
    • just like dauphin.
    • In lumbering, a cluster of heaps that a boom is guaranteed. [U. S.]
    • identical to dolphin-fly.
    • any of numerous small toothed whales with a beaklike snout; larger than porpoises
    • big slender meals and game fish widely distributed in cozy seas (especially around Hawaii)
    • any one of numerous marine cetacean animals, like the bottle-nosed dolphin, of this family Delphinidae, regarding the whales but usually smaller and having a beaklike snout.
    • A large marine food and game fish (Coryphaena hippurus) discovered global in tropical seas, having an iridescent blue straight back, yellow edges, a steep blunt forehead, and a long constant dorsal fin. Also known as dolphinfish, dorado, mahi-mahi.
    • A similar seafood (C. equisetis) of smaller size, having silvery or pale-yellow edges. Also called dolphinfish, pompano dolphin.
    • A buoy, heap, or set of heaps useful for mooring ships.
    • some of different marine cetacean animals, like the bottle-nosed dolphin, associated with family members Delphinidae, associated with the whales but generally smaller and having a beaklike snout.
    • a team of piers made use of as a fender at a dock.
    • A large marine meals and online game seafood (Coryphaena hippurus) found global in tropical oceans, having an iridescent blue straight back, yellowish sides, a steep blunt forehead, and an extended constant dorsal fin. Also called dolphinfish, dorado, mahi-mahi.
    • A carnivorous aquatic mammal inhabiting mostly in shallower seas associated with continental racks, famed for its cleverness and occasional readiness to approach people.
    • A similar seafood (C. equisetis) of smaller size, having silvery or pale-yellow edges. Also called dolphinfish, pompano dolphin.
    • A fish, the mahi-mahi or dorado, scientific name Coryphaena hippurus, with a dorsal fin that works the size of your body, identified for iridescent coloration.
    • A buoy, heap, or group of piles used for mooring boats.
    • The dauphin, eldest boy of this leaders of France.
    • a small grouping of piers used as a fender at a dock.
    • A man-made semi submerged maritime structure, often set up to offer a fixed framework for short-term mooring, to stop vessels from drifting to shallow-water or even act as base for navigational helps.
    • A carnivorous aquatic mammal inhabiting mostly when you look at the shallower seas of this continental shelves, famed for the intelligence and occasional willingness to approach humans.
    • A cetacean for the genus Delphinus and allied genera (esp. Delphinus delphis); the genuine dolphin.
    • A fish, the mahi-mahi or dorado, medical name Coryphaena hippurus, with a dorsal fin that runs the size of your body, identified for iridescent color.
    • The dauphin, eldest son of leaders of France.
    • A man-made semi submerged maritime construction, usually set up to present a hard and fast framework for short-term mooring, to avoid boats from drifting to shallow-water or to serve as base for navigational aids.
    • A cetacean regarding the genus Delphinus and allied genera (esp. Delphinus delphis); the true dolphin.
    • The Coryphæna hippuris, a fish of about five feet in length, celebrated for its surprising changes of color when dying. It is the fish commonly known as the dolphin. The term is also applied to the related Coryphaena equisetis. Called also dolphinfish and (especially in Hawaii) mahimahi. See also dolphinfish and Coryphænoid.
    • A mass of iron or lead hung from yardarm, in ability becoming dropped on deck of an enemy's vessel.
    • A kind of wreath or band of plaited cordage.
    • A spar or buoy held by an anchor and furnished with a ring that vessels may fasten their particular cables.
    • A mooring post on a wharf or beach.
    • A permanent fender around much watercraft just beneath the gunwale.
    • In old ordnance, one of several manages above the trunnions through which a cannon had been lifted.
    • A small constellation between Aquila and Pegasus. See Delphinus, n., 2.
    • The popular title regarding the cetaceous mammals associated with household Delphinidæ and genus Delphinus, the majority of which are also called plus usually called porpoises, this word being interchangeable with dolphin.
    • A general and preferred title of seafood of this household Coryphænidæ: so called from some con-fusion aided by the animals of the same title.
    • In Gr. antiquity, a ponderous size of lead or metal suspended from a unique lawn on a naval vessel, and, if possibility delivered, allow end up in the your hands on a hostile ship to sink her by breaking through the woman base.
    • Nautical: A spar or buoy made fast to an anchor, and often provided with a ring to enable vessels to drive because of it.
    • A mooring-post placed at the entrance of a dock.
    • The Coryphæna hippuris, a fish of approximately five legs long, celebrated because of its surprising changes of color whenever dying. This is the fish commonly known as the dolphin. The definition of can be applied to the related Coryphaena equisetis. Called in addition dolphinfish and (especially in Hawaii) mahimahi. See in addition dolphinfish and Coryphænoid.
    • at the beginning of artillery, a handle cast solid on a cannon.
    • quite a few metal or lead hung from the yardarm, in readiness become fallen on deck of an enemy's vessel.
    • [capitalized] In astronomy, an old north constellation, Delphinus (which see).
    • In design, a technical term applied to the pipeline and cover at a source when it comes to method of getting water.
    • A kind of wreath or strap of plaited cordage.
    • In Christian archæol., an image or representation of a dolphin, constituting an emblem of love, diligence, and swiftness.
    • A spar or buoy held by an anchor and furnished with a ring to which vessels may fasten their cables.
    • just like dauphin.
    • A mooring post on a wharf or coastline.
    • In lumbering, a cluster of heaps that a boom is guaranteed. [U. S.]
    • A permanent fender around much watercraft just beneath the gunwale.
    • identical to dolphin-fly.
    • In old ordnance, one of several handles above the trunnions through which a cannon was lifted.
    • any one of numerous small toothed whales with a beaklike snout; larger than porpoises
    • a little constellation between Aquila and Pegasus. See Delphinus, n., 2.
    • big thin meals and online game seafood extensively distributed in cozy seas (especially around Hawaii)
    • the most popular name associated with the cetaceous mammals regarding the family Delphinidæ and genus Delphinus, nearly all of that are also called and more usually called porpoises, this term being compatible with dolphin.
    • A general and popular name of fish of the family Coryphænidæ: so called from some con-fusion with the mammals of the same name.
    • In Gr. antiquity, a ponderous size of lead or metal suspended from an unique lawn on a naval vessel, and, if possibility offered, allow fall under the your hands on a hostile ship to sink the woman by breaking through the woman base.
    • Nautical: A spar or buoy made quickly to an anchor, and often given a ring to enable vessels to drive because of it.
    • A mooring-post placed in the entry of a dock.
    • during the early artillery, a handle cast solid on a cannon.
    • [capitalized] In astronomy, an ancient north constellation, Delphinus (which see).
    • In design, a technical term placed on the pipe and address at a source the supply of water.
    • In Christian archæol., a graphic or representation of a dolphin, constituting an emblem of love, diligence, and swiftness.
    • just like dauphin.
    • In lumbering, a cluster of piles that a boom is secured. [U. S.]
    • just like dolphin-fly.
    • any one of different small-toothed whales with a beaklike snout; bigger than porpoises
    • big slim meals and game seafood extensively distributed in warm seas (especially around Hawaii)

Related Sources

  • Sentence for "dolphin"
  • Quotes for "dolphin"
    • "Our top story tonight: Famous TV…"
    • View More
  • Phrases for "dolphin"
  • Cross Reference for "dolphin"
  • Same Context for "dolphin"
  • Urban Dictionary for "dolphin"
    • whenever you attempt to enter the…
    • View More
1553 votes

How would you define dolphin?

All the definitions on AZdictionary were written by people just like you. Now's your chance to add your own!