dodder definition

  • verb-intransitive:
    • To shake or tremble, as from old-age; totter.
    • To shake or tremble, as from senior years; totter.
    • To progress in a feeble, unsteady fashion.
    • to succeed in a feeble, unsteady manner.
    • To shake or tremble, as from old-age; totter.
    • To progress in a feeble, unsteady fashion.
    • To shake or tremble, as from old-age; totter.
    • To progress in a feeble, unsteady fashion.
  • noun:
    • any one of numerous leafless, yearly parasitic natural herbs associated with the genus Cuscuta that lack chlorophyll while having slender, twining, yellowish or reddish stems and little whitish blossoms.
    • any one of various leafless, annual parasitic natural herbs regarding the genus Cuscuta that lack chlorophyll and now have slender, twining, yellowish or reddish stems and little whitish plants.
    • Any of about 100-170 species of yellow, orange or red (seldom green) parasitic flowers regarding the genus Cuscuta. Previously treated because the just genus in the household Cuscutaceae, current genetic analysis by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group shows that it is properly positioned in the morning glory family members, Convolvulaceae.
    • any one of about 100-170 species of yellow, orange or purple (seldom green) parasitic flowers associated with genus Cuscuta. Previously addressed whilst the just genus when you look at the household Cuscutaceae, present hereditary analysis by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group shows it is properly put into the morning-glory family, Convolvulaceae.
    • A plant regarding the genus Cuscuta. It is a leafless parasitical vine with yellow threadlike stems. It connects itself to a different plant, regarding flax, goldenrod, etc., and decaying within root, is nourished by the plant that aids it.
    • A plant associated with the genus Cuscuta. It really is a leafless parasitical vine with yellow threadlike stems. It attaches itself to a different plant, on flax, goldenrod, etc., and decaying at the root, is nourished by the plant that supports it.
    • The Typical title of plants for the genus Cuscuta, several very slender, branched, twining, leafless, yellow or reddish yearly parasites, of the natural purchase Convolvulaceæ.
    • The common name of plants of the genus Cuscuta, a group of very slender, branched, twining, leafless, yellowish or reddish annual parasites, belonging to the natural order Convolvulaceæ.
    • the different dodders are named, typically, from their particular major number or from some leading character, and specific names usually are translations of vernacular people or the other way around. See the following phrases.
    • various dodders tend to be called, generally, from their particular main number or from some leading personality, and the certain names usually are translations of vernacular ones or vice versa. See the following phrases.
    • a leafless yearly parasitic vine associated with genus Cuscuta having whitish or yellow filamentous stems; acquire nutrition through haustoria
    • a leafless yearly parasitic vine of this genus Cuscuta having whitish or yellow filamentous stems; get nutrition through haustoria
    • Any of various leafless, yearly parasitic herbs of this genus Cuscuta that are lacking chlorophyll while having slender, twining, yellowish or reddish stems and small whitish flowers.
    • any one of about 100-170 species of yellowish, orange or red (hardly ever green) parasitic plants for the genus Cuscuta. Previously treated as only genus into the household Cuscutaceae, recent genetic research because of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group has revealed it is properly put into the morning glory family, Convolvulaceae.
    • A plant of the genus Cuscuta. Its a leafless parasitical vine with yellowish threadlike stems. It attaches itself to some other plant, regarding flax, goldenrod, etc., and decaying at root, is nourished by the plant that aids it.
    • the normal title of flowers for the genus Cuscuta, several very slender, branched, twining, leafless, yellowish or reddish annual parasites, of the all-natural order Convolvulaceæ.
    • various dodders are named, in most cases, from their major host or from some leading personality, in addition to particular brands are translations of vernacular ones or the other way around. See the after phrases.
    • a leafless yearly parasitic vine associated with the genus Cuscuta having whitish or yellowish filamentous stems; obtain nutrition through haustoria
    • any one of various leafless, annual parasitic herbs for the genus Cuscuta that are lacking chlorophyll and also have slender, twining, yellowish or reddish stems and little whitish blossoms.
    • some of about 100-170 species of yellowish, orange or red (hardly ever green) parasitic plants associated with genus Cuscuta. Formerly treated as just genus into the family Cuscutaceae, recent genetic analysis by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group indicates that it's properly placed in the morning-glory household, Convolvulaceae.
    • A plant of this genus Cuscuta. It is a leafless parasitical vine with yellowish threadlike stems. It attaches it self to a different plant, regarding flax, goldenrod, etc., and decaying in the root, is nourished by the plant that aids it.
    • the normal name of flowers for the genus Cuscuta, several really thin, branched, twining, leafless, yellowish or reddish yearly parasites, of the all-natural order Convolvulaceæ.
    • The various dodders are named, for the most part, from their principal host or from some leading character, and the specific names are usually translations of vernacular ones or vice versa. See the following phrases.
    • a leafless annual parasitic vine of genus Cuscuta having whitish or yellowish filamentous stems; get nutrition through haustoria
  • verb:
    • To shake or tremble as one moves, specially at the time of old-age or childhood; to totter.
    • To shake or tremble together techniques, specifically as of senior years or youth; to totter.
    • To shake, tremble, or totter.
    • To shake, tremble, or totter.
    • stroll unsteadily
    • stroll unsteadily
    • To shake or tremble together moves, especially at the time of later years or childhood; to totter.
    • To shake, tremble, or totter.
    • walk unsteadily
    • To shake or tremble together techniques, specifically at the time of old-age or childhood; to totter.
    • To shake, tremble, or totter.
    • stroll unsteadily
  • others:
    • To shake; tremble.
    • To shake; tremble.
    • To shake; tremble.
    • To shake; tremble.

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